Use of a Wellness Coaching Model Among Urban-Dwelling, Low-Income Older Adults

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/621579
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Poster
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
Use of a Wellness Coaching Model Among Urban-Dwelling, Low-Income Older Adults
Author(s):
Lee, Bertha
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Gamma Epsilon
Author Details:
Bertha Lee, BSN, RN, Professional Experience: 2008-Present – Registered Nurse, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA Provide quality care to patients and families in a safe and empathetic environment Interpret for Korean and Spanish-speaking patients and family members Precept nursing students, newly licensed nurses, float nurses, and travel nurses Serve as charge nurse, a resource for staff nurses, for the shift Unit champion for the annual peer-to-peer flu vaccine program 2015-2016 – Research Assistant, Northeastern University/Boston Housing Authority, Boston, MA Used the interRAI comprehensive assessment tools and a wellness coaching system to promote self-care in low-income older adults Author Summary: Bertha Lee is a PhD nursing student at Northeastern University. While attending school, Bertha keeps her clinical position as a medical nurse at Brigham and Women's Hospital, where she was recognized as a BWH Essence of Nursing Award Honoree and BWH Medicine Housestaff Nursing Award Winner.
Abstract:

Older adults, age 65 years or over, currently represent 14.5% of the United States (U.S.) population. This value is projected to more than double to 98 million by 2060 (AoA, 2015) as ann increasing number of older adults, both rich and poor, are living longer in the presence of chronic disease and illness symptoms (National Center for Health Statistics (US) & National Center for Health Services Research, 2012). Compared to younger individual, older adults are more likely to experience repeated hospitalizations and/or unplanned visits to their health care provider, and face increased costs to manage their health (Lehnert et al., 2011). Prolonged life, desired by many, brings new challenges. Older adults often struggle to maintain quality of life and independence in the presence of complex, chronic diseases and prevailing illness symptoms; for low-income elders with limited access to a resourceful, supportive environment, these challenges are even more profound (Huguet, Kaplan, & Feeny, 2008).

Partnering with the Boston Housing Authority (BHA), this pilot project implemented a wellness coaching model consisting of a comprehensive, geriatric assessment, an individualized healthy aging plan, and continued coach contacts to increase health self-management. Troutman’s theory of successful aging, that supports individual determination of successful aging and an action plan to achieve life goals provided the theoretical foundation. Troutman’s theory of successful aging involves three coping processes: 1. functional performance mechanisms, 2. intra-psychic factors, and 3. spirituality (Topaz, Troutman-Jordan, MacKenzie, 2014). Functional performance mechanisms refer to the use of conscious awareness and choice as an adaptive response to physiologic and physical aging. Intrapsychic factors are the innate features that contribute to the person’s ability to adapt to change and solve problems. Spirituality consists of the person’s beliefs and views that relates to something greater than self. Each of the three processes contribute to the complex process of gero-transcendence and, ultimately, successful aging.

The primary purpose of this study was to determine if low-income older adults who participate in a personalized wellness coaching model will have increased self-management behaviors (i.e. physical activity) as compared to a wait-list control group. The study sample included minority older adults residing in one of two BHA sites. Fifteen participants (5 females and 10 males, mean age 77.4 ± 7.9 years) were assigned to the intervention group and 13 older adults (7 females and 6 males, mean age 75.8 ± 9.1 years) from another BHA site made up the control group, crossing over to the intervention six months later. Assessment tools used were interRAI’s Health & Social Check-up and the Lifestyle Survey.

Independent and paired t-tests (p<0.05) were calculated to compare baseline and follow-up results. There was statistical improvement of physical activity in both Amory Groups 1 (p<0.02) and 2 (p<0.016) and the PAM score (p<0.05) in Amory Group 2. Self-reported quality of life statistically decreased in the control group at Holgate.

Keywords:
older adults; successful aging; wellness coaching model
Repository Posting Date:
22-Jun-2017
Date of Publication:
22-Jun-2017
Other Identifiers:
INRC17PST460
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
28th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Dublin, Ireland
Description:
Event Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarship

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePosteren
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.titleUse of a Wellness Coaching Model Among Urban-Dwelling, Low-Income Older Adultsen_US
dc.contributor.authorLee, Berthaen
dc.contributor.departmentGamma Epsilonen
dc.author.detailsBertha Lee, BSN, RN, Professional Experience: 2008-Present – Registered Nurse, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA Provide quality care to patients and families in a safe and empathetic environment Interpret for Korean and Spanish-speaking patients and family members Precept nursing students, newly licensed nurses, float nurses, and travel nurses Serve as charge nurse, a resource for staff nurses, for the shift Unit champion for the annual peer-to-peer flu vaccine program 2015-2016 – Research Assistant, Northeastern University/Boston Housing Authority, Boston, MA Used the interRAI comprehensive assessment tools and a wellness coaching system to promote self-care in low-income older adults Author Summary: Bertha Lee is a PhD nursing student at Northeastern University. While attending school, Bertha keeps her clinical position as a medical nurse at Brigham and Women's Hospital, where she was recognized as a BWH Essence of Nursing Award Honoree and BWH Medicine Housestaff Nursing Award Winner.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/621579-
dc.description.abstract<p><span>Older adults, age 65 years or over, currently represent 14.5% of the United States (U.S.) population. This value is projected to more than double to 98 million by 2060 (AoA, 2015) as ann increasing number of older adults, both rich and poor, are living longer in the presence of chronic disease and illness symptoms (National Center for Health Statistics (US) & National Center for Health Services Research, 2012). Compared to younger individual, older adults are more likely to experience repeated hospitalizations and/or unplanned visits to their health care provider, and face increased costs to manage their health (Lehnert et al., 2011). Prolonged life, desired by many, brings new challenges. Older adults often struggle to maintain quality of life and independence in the presence of complex, chronic diseases and prevailing illness symptoms; for low-income elders with limited access to a resourceful, supportive environment, these challenges are even more profound (Huguet, Kaplan, & Feeny, 2008).</span></p> <p>Partnering with the Boston Housing Authority (BHA), this pilot project implemented a wellness coaching model consisting of a comprehensive, geriatric assessment, an individualized healthy aging plan, and continued coach contacts to increase health self-management. Troutman’s theory of successful aging, that supports individual determination of successful aging and an action plan to achieve life goals provided the theoretical foundation. Troutman’s theory of successful aging involves three coping processes: 1. functional performance mechanisms, 2. intra-psychic factors, and 3. spirituality (Topaz, Troutman-Jordan, MacKenzie, 2014). Functional performance mechanisms refer to the use of conscious awareness and choice as an adaptive response to physiologic and physical aging. Intrapsychic factors are the innate features that contribute to the person’s ability to adapt to change and solve problems. Spirituality consists of the person’s beliefs and views that relates to something greater than self. Each of the three processes contribute to the complex process of gero-transcendence and, ultimately, successful aging.</p> <p>The primary purpose of this study was to determine if low-income older adults who participate in a personalized wellness coaching model will have increased self-management behaviors (i.e. physical activity) as compared to a wait-list control group. The study sample included minority older adults residing in one of two BHA sites. Fifteen participants (5 females and 10 males, mean age 77.4 ± 7.9 years) were assigned to the intervention group and 13 older adults (7 females and 6 males, mean age 75.8 ± 9.1 years) from another BHA site made up the control group, crossing over to the intervention six months later. Assessment tools used were interRAI’s Health & Social Check-up and the Lifestyle Survey.</p> <p>Independent and paired t-tests (p<0.05) were calculated to compare baseline and follow-up results. There was statistical improvement of physical activity in both Amory Groups 1 (p<0.02) and 2 (p<0.016) and the PAM score (p<0.05) in Amory Group 2. Self-reported quality of life statistically decreased in the control group at Holgate.</p>en
dc.subjectolder adultsen
dc.subjectsuccessful agingen
dc.subjectwellness coaching modelen
dc.date.available2017-06-22T16:34:40Z-
dc.date.issued2017-06-22-
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-22T16:34:40Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.name28th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.conference.locationDublin, Irelanden
dc.descriptionEvent Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarshipen
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