Factors associated with psychotropic drug use among community-dwelling older persons: A review of empirical studies

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/621587
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Article
Level of Evidence:
Systematic Review
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
Factors associated with psychotropic drug use among community-dwelling older persons: A review of empirical studies
Author(s):
Voyer, Philippe; Cohen, David; Lauzon, Sylvie; Collin, Johanne
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Abstract:

Background: In the many descriptive studies on prescribed psychotropic drug use by community-dwelling older persons, several sociodemographic and other factors associated with drug use receive inconsistent support. Method: Empirical reports with data on at least benzodiazepine or antidepressant drug use in samples of older persons published between 1990 and 2001 (n = 32) were identified from major databases and analyzed to determine which factors are most frequently associated with psychotropic drug use in multivariate analyses. Methodological aspects were also examined. Results: Most reports used probability samples of users and non-users and employed cross-sectional designs. Among variables considered in 5 or more reports, race, proximity to health centers, medical consultations, sleep complaints, and health perception were virtually always associated to drug use. Gender, mental health, and physical health status were associated in about two-thirds of reports. Associations with age, marital status, medication coverage, socioeconomic status, and social support were usually not observed. Conclusions: The large variety of methods to operationalize drug use, mental health status, and social support probably affected the magnitude of observed relationships. Employing longitudinal designs and distinguishing short-term from long-term use, focusing on samples of drug users exclusively, defining drug use and drug classes more uniformly, and utilizing measures of psychological well-being rather than only of distress, might clarify the nature of observed associations and the direction of causality. Few studies tested specific hypotheses. Most studies focused on individual characteristics of respondents, neglecting the potential contribution of health care professionals to the phenomenon of psychotropic drug use among seniors.

Keywords:
Psychotropic Drugs; Elderly
CINAHL Headings:
Community Living--In Old Age; Aged; Psychotropic Drugs; Psychotropic Drugs--Therapeutic Use
Repository Posting Date:
23-Jun-2017
Date of Publication:
13-Aug-2004
Version of Published Work:
Publisher's version
Citation:
Voyer, P., Cohen, D., Lauzon, S., & Collin, J. (2004). Factors associated with psychotropic drug use among community-dwelling older persons: A review of empirical studies. BMC Nursing. 3 (1). DOI: 10.1186/1472-6955-3-3. Retrieved from http://www.nursinglibrary.org/vhl/handle/10755/621587
Publisher:
BioMed Central Ltd.
Description:
PV and DC conducted the literature review and drafted the manuscript. SL and JC revised the literature review and subsequent drafts. All authors read and approved the final manuscript. The authors thank the Conseil Québécois de la recherche sociale, the Faculty of nursing of Laval University and of University of Montreal, the University institute of social gerontology of Quebec, the Canadian nurses foundation, the research group on social aspects of health and prevention and the College of health and urban affairs of Florida International University for their financial support.
Note:
This item appears in the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by way of the author’s decision to publish with BMC Nursing, an open access journal, under a Creative Commons Attribution License 4.0. The license allows users to freely share and adapt the author’s material for any purpose, even commercially. Please refer to the attached license (the icon at the bottom of this entry) for further information and terms. All terms of the license have been followed. There are no changes in this article from the original posting. Neither STTI nor the Henderson Repository has any affiliation with BMC Nursing. Each shares only a mutual desire to distribute nursing research in an open access venue.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typeArticleen
dc.evidence.levelSystematic Reviewen
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.titleFactors associated with psychotropic drug use among community-dwelling older persons: A review of empirical studiesen_US
dc.contributor.authorVoyer, Philippeen
dc.contributor.authorCohen, Daviden
dc.contributor.authorLauzon, Sylvieen
dc.contributor.authorCollin, Johanneen
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/621587-
dc.description.abstract<p>Background: In the many descriptive studies on prescribed psychotropic drug use by community-dwelling older persons, several sociodemographic and other factors associated with drug use receive inconsistent support. Method: Empirical reports with data on at least benzodiazepine or antidepressant drug use in samples of older persons published between 1990 and 2001 (n = 32) were identified from major databases and analyzed to determine which factors are most frequently associated with psychotropic drug use in multivariate analyses. Methodological aspects were also examined. Results: Most reports used probability samples of users and non-users and employed cross-sectional designs. Among variables considered in 5 or more reports, race, proximity to health centers, medical consultations, sleep complaints, and health perception were virtually always associated to drug use. Gender, mental health, and physical health status were associated in about two-thirds of reports. Associations with age, marital status, medication coverage, socioeconomic status, and social support were usually not observed. Conclusions: The large variety of methods to operationalize drug use, mental health status, and social support probably affected the magnitude of observed relationships. Employing longitudinal designs and distinguishing short-term from long-term use, focusing on samples of drug users exclusively, defining drug use and drug classes more uniformly, and utilizing measures of psychological well-being rather than only of distress, might clarify the nature of observed associations and the direction of causality. Few studies tested specific hypotheses. Most studies focused on individual characteristics of respondents, neglecting the potential contribution of health care professionals to the phenomenon of psychotropic drug use among seniors.</p>en
dc.subjectPsychotropic Drugsen
dc.subjectElderlyen
dc.subject.cinahlCommunity Living--In Old Ageen
dc.subject.cinahlAgeden
dc.subject.cinahlPsychotropic Drugsen
dc.subject.cinahlPsychotropic Drugs--Therapeutic Useen
dc.date.available2017-06-23T15:20:51Z-
dc.date.issued2004-08-13-
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-23T15:20:51Z-
dc.type.versionPublisher's versionen
dc.identifier.citationVoyer, P., Cohen, D., Lauzon, S., & Collin, J. (2004). Factors associated with psychotropic drug use among community-dwelling older persons: A review of empirical studies. BMC Nursing. 3 (1). DOI: 10.1186/1472-6955-3-3. Retrieved from http://www.nursinglibrary.org/vhl/handle/10755/621587en
dc.publisherBioMed Central Ltd.en
dc.identifier.issn1472-6955-
dc.identifier.issnBMC Nursing-
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1472-6955-3-3-
dc.identifier.citationVoyer, P., Cohen, D., Lauzon, S., & Collin, J. (2004). Factors associated with psychotropic drug use among community-dwelling older persons: A review of empirical studies. BMC Nursing. 3 (1). DOI: 10.1186/1472-6955-3-3. Retrieved from http://www.nursinglibrary.org/vhl/handle/10755/621587en
dc.descriptionPV and DC conducted the literature review and drafted the manuscript. SL and JC revised the literature review and subsequent drafts. All authors read and approved the final manuscript. The authors thank the Conseil Québécois de la recherche sociale, the Faculty of nursing of Laval University and of University of Montreal, the University institute of social gerontology of Quebec, the Canadian nurses foundation, the research group on social aspects of health and prevention and the College of health and urban affairs of Florida International University for their financial support.en
dc.description.noteThis item appears in the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by way of the author’s decision to publish with BMC Nursing, an open access journal, under a Creative Commons Attribution License 4.0. The license allows users to freely share and adapt the author’s material for any purpose, even commercially. Please refer to the attached license (the icon at the bottom of this entry) for further information and terms. All terms of the license have been followed. There are no changes in this article from the original posting. Neither STTI nor the Henderson Repository has any affiliation with BMC Nursing. Each shares only a mutual desire to distribute nursing research in an open access venue.-
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