2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/621591
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
DNP Capstone Project
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
Utilizing Technology to Improve Patient Comprehension
Author(s):
Williams, Christina S.
Additional Author Information:
Christina S. Williams, DNP, APRN, FNP-BC
Advisors:
Wijewardane, Johnnie Susan Cooper; Phelon, Shonda; Lester, Alena
Degree:
DNP
Degree Year:
2017
Grantor:
Mississippi University for Women
Abstract:

Background

Patient comprehension of discharge instructions is a cornerstone for successful health care. If healthy outcomes are to be achieved, patients need to comprehend discharge instructions given by the healthcare provider. Patients in an acute care setting often have difficulty with recollection or comprehension of discharge instructions. Poor comprehension is likely to interfere with the patient’s ability to properly administer medication, follow treatment modalities, recognize complications, and adhere to follow up care. The purpose of the project was to increase patients’ comprehension of discharge instructions to promote optimal recovery from illness.

Method

The project was conducted in an Urgent Care setting and utilized informatics to aide in patient comprehension of discharge instructions. The researcher recorded videos explaining important teaching on Strep Throat, Mononucleosis, Upper Respiratory Infections, and Urinary Tract Infections, as well as Lacerations and Sprains. Once patients were diagnosed, they viewed the appropriate video via electronic device in the office while waiting on discharge paperwork. A brief survey was provided to assess the benefits of the teaching tool.

Results

Of the 376 participants, 56% responded that they preferred video discharge teaching, while 36% prefer verbal discharge teaching. Ten percent of the participants wrote in that they preferred either. The participants were provided the web link to the video.  When participants were questioned on whether they would access the video if they developed questions about their diagnosis after discharge, 77% of them responded yes, and 23% responded no. All participants responded that they felt well informed about their diagnosis from the video teaching that was received.

Conclusion

Overall, video discharge teaching was determined to be beneficial to the patient’s comprehension of the information provided.

Keywords:
Discharge teaching; Technology; Patient comprehension; Informatics
CINAHL Headings:
Patient Discharge Education; Patient Discharge; Patient Education--Methods; Patient Education; Videorecording; Nursing Informatics
Note:
This work has been approved through a faculty review process prior to its posting in the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository.
Repository Posting Date:
2017-06-23T19:13:32Z
Date of Publication:
2017-06-23

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorWijewardane, Johnnie Susan Cooperen
dc.contributor.advisorPhelon, Shondaen
dc.contributor.advisorLester, Alenaen
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Christina S.en
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-23T19:13:32Z-
dc.date.available2017-06-23T19:13:32Z-
dc.date.issued2017-06-23-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/621591-
dc.description.abstract<p><strong>Background</strong></p> <p>Patient comprehension of discharge instructions is a cornerstone for successful health care. If healthy outcomes are to be achieved, patients need to comprehend discharge instructions given by the healthcare provider. Patients in an acute care setting often have difficulty with recollection or comprehension of discharge instructions. Poor comprehension is likely to interfere with the patient’s ability to properly administer medication, follow treatment modalities, recognize complications, and adhere to follow up care. The purpose of the project was to increase patients’ comprehension of discharge instructions to promote optimal recovery from illness.</p> <p><strong>Method</strong></p> <p>The project was conducted in an Urgent Care setting and utilized informatics to aide in patient comprehension of discharge instructions. The researcher recorded videos explaining important teaching on Strep Throat, Mononucleosis, Upper Respiratory Infections, and Urinary Tract Infections, as well as Lacerations and Sprains. Once patients were diagnosed, they viewed the appropriate video via electronic device in the office while waiting on discharge paperwork. A brief survey was provided to assess the benefits of the teaching tool.</p> <p><strong>Results</strong></p> <p>Of the 376 participants, 56% responded that they preferred video discharge teaching, while 36% prefer verbal discharge teaching. Ten percent of the participants wrote in that they preferred either. The participants were provided the web link to the video.  When participants were questioned on whether they would access the video if they developed questions about their diagnosis after discharge, 77% of them responded yes, and 23% responded no. All participants responded that they felt well informed about their diagnosis from the video teaching that was received.</p> <p><strong>Conclusion</strong></p> <p>Overall, video discharge teaching was determined to be beneficial to the patient’s comprehension of the information provided.</p>en
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectDischarge teachingen
dc.subjectTechnologyen
dc.subjectPatient comprehensionen
dc.subjectInformaticsen
dc.titleUtilizing Technology to Improve Patient Comprehensionen_US
dc.typeDNP Capstone Projecten
thesis.degree.grantorMississippi University for Womenen
thesis.degree.levelDNPen
dc.description.noteThis work has been approved through a faculty review process prior to its posting in the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository.-
dc.primary-author.detailsChristina S. Williams, DNP, APRN, FNP-BCen
thesis.degree.year2017en
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.subject.cinahlPatient Discharge Educationen
dc.subject.cinahlPatient Dischargeen
dc.subject.cinahlPatient Education--Methodsen
dc.subject.cinahlPatient Educationen
dc.subject.cinahlVideorecordingen
dc.subject.cinahlNursing Informaticsen
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