2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/621592
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Other Graduate Paper
Level of Evidence:
Other
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
Cuffed verses Uncuffed Endotracheal Tubes for Pediatric Patients
Author(s):
Scott, Bryce
Additional Author Information:
Bryce Scott, DNAP, CRNA bryce.scott@bryanhealthcollege.edu
Advisors:
Hadenfeldt, Sharon
Degree:
Doctoral – Other
Degree Year:
2017
Grantor:
Bryan College of Health Sciences
Abstract:

Pediatric airway management can present many challenges for anesthetists. One such challenge is whether to use a cuffed or uncuffed endotracheal tube (ETT) for pediatric patients younger than eight years. Practitioners have used uncuffed ETTs for smaller children due to the risk of cuffed ETTs causing airway mucosal injury which may lead to subglottic stenosis and stridor.1 In recent years, cuffed ETTs have been used more frequently in order to reduce tube exchanges, ventilation leak around the tube, unreliable end-tidal carbon dioxide (ETCO2) monitoring, and the risk of aspiration.1 The purpose of this evidence based practice analysis is to compare the incidence of common airway complications in pediatric patients intubated with a cuffed or uncuffed ETT.

Keywords:
Pediatrics; cuffed; uncuffed; endotracheal tube; stridor; re-intubation
CINAHL Headings:
Endotracheal Tubes--In Infancy and Childhood; Endotracheal Tubes; Intubation, Intratracheal; Intubation, Intratracheal--Methods
Repository Posting Date:
2017-06-23T19:25:09Z
Date of Publication:
2017-06-23

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorHadenfeldt, Sharonen
dc.contributor.authorScott, Bryceen
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-23T19:25:09Z-
dc.date.available2017-06-23T19:25:09Z-
dc.date.issued2017-06-23-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/621592-
dc.description.abstract<p>Pediatric airway management can present many challenges for anesthetists. One such challenge is whether to use a cuffed or uncuffed endotracheal tube (ETT) for pediatric patients younger than eight years. Practitioners have used uncuffed ETTs for smaller children due to the risk of cuffed ETTs causing airway mucosal injury which may lead to subglottic stenosis and stridor.<span style="font-size: xx-small;">1</span> In recent years, cuffed ETTs have been used more frequently in order to reduce tube exchanges, ventilation leak around the tube, unreliable end-tidal carbon dioxide (ETCO2) monitoring, and the risk of aspiration.</span><span style="font-size: xx-small;">1 </span><span style="font-size: small;">The purpose of this evidence based practice analysis is to compare the incidence of common airway complications in pediatric patients intubated with a cuffed or uncuffed ETT. </p>en
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectPediatricsen
dc.subjectcuffeden
dc.subjectuncuffeden
dc.subjectendotracheal tubeen
dc.subjectstridoren
dc.subjectre-intubationen
dc.titleCuffed verses Uncuffed Endotracheal Tubes for Pediatric Patientsen_US
dc.typeOther Graduate Paperen
thesis.degree.grantorBryan College of Health Sciencesen
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral – Otheren
dc.primary-author.detailsBryce Scott, DNAP, CRNA bryce.scott@bryanhealthcollege.eduen
thesis.degree.year2017en
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.evidence.levelOtheren
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.subject.cinahlEndotracheal Tubes--In Infancy and Childhooden
dc.subject.cinahlEndotracheal Tubesen
dc.subject.cinahlIntubation, Intratrachealen
dc.subject.cinahlIntubation, Intratracheal--Methodsen
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