2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/621593
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Other Graduate Paper
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
Ketorolac use in the Pediatric Surgical Patient: An Evidence-Based Practice Analysis
Author(s):
Beach, Jason
Additional Author Information:
Jason Beach, DNAP, CRNA jason.beach@bryanhealthcollege.edu
Advisors:
Hadenfeldt, Sharon
Degree:
Doctoral – Other
Degree Year:
2017
Grantor:
Bryan College of Health Sciences
Abstract:

Opioid-based medications are often the first medications selected for pain control in young patients; however opioids possess several unwanted side effects such as respiratory depression, nausea, vomiting and allergic reactions. Administration of medications that support a multimodal approach to pain management is imperative. It is a longstanding belief that pediatric pain is significantly undertreated due to providers’ hesitance to use non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Baley et al.1 cite that anesthesia providers have been challenged to eliminate the under treatment of pain in the pediatric population. The pediatric population is at high risk for inadequate pain management and providers should strongly consider adjunct medications in the treatment of pain.

Keywords:
ketorolac; Toradol; blood loss; bleeding; perioperative; pediatric
CINAHL Headings:
Ketorolac; Ketorolac--Administration and Dosage; Ketorolac--Therapeutic Use--In Infancy and Childhood; Ketorolac--Therapeutic Use; Postoperative Pain--Drug Therapy--In Infancy and Childhood; Postoperative Pain--Drug Therapy; Postoperative Pain; Platelet Aggregation--Drug Effects
Repository Posting Date:
2017-06-23T19:36:24Z
Date of Publication:
2017-06-23

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorHadenfeldt, Sharonen
dc.contributor.authorBeach, Jasonen
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-23T19:36:24Z-
dc.date.available2017-06-23T19:36:24Z-
dc.date.issued2017-06-23-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/621593-
dc.description.abstract<p>Opioid-based medications are often the first medications selected for pain control in young patients; however opioids possess several unwanted side effects such as respiratory depression, nausea, vomiting and allergic reactions. Administration of medications that support a multimodal approach to pain management is imperative. It is a longstanding belief that pediatric pain is significantly undertreated due to providers’ hesitance to use non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Baley et al.</span><span style="font-size: xx-small;">1 </span><span style="font-size: small;">cite that anesthesia providers have been challenged to eliminate the under treatment of pain in the pediatric population. The pediatric population is at high risk for inadequate pain management and providers should strongly consider adjunct medications in the treatment of pain.</p>en
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectketorolacen
dc.subjectToradolen
dc.subjectblood lossen
dc.subjectbleedingen
dc.subjectperioperativeen
dc.subjectpediatricen
dc.titleKetorolac use in the Pediatric Surgical Patient: An Evidence-Based Practice Analysisen_US
dc.typeOther Graduate Paperen
thesis.degree.grantorBryan College of Health Sciencesen
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral – Otheren
dc.primary-author.detailsJason Beach, DNAP, CRNA jason.beach@bryanhealthcollege.eduen
thesis.degree.year2017en
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.subject.cinahlKetorolacen
dc.subject.cinahlKetorolac--Administration and Dosageen
dc.subject.cinahlKetorolac--Therapeutic Use--In Infancy and Childhooden
dc.subject.cinahlKetorolac--Therapeutic Useen
dc.subject.cinahlPostoperative Pain--Drug Therapy--In Infancy and Childhooden
dc.subject.cinahlPostoperative Pain--Drug Therapyen
dc.subject.cinahlPostoperative Painen
dc.subject.cinahlPlatelet Aggregation--Drug Effectsen
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