2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/621595
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Other Graduate Paper
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
Recommendations for Breast Feeding Mothers after Anesthesia: a Quality Improvement Project
Author(s):
Meyers, Blake
Additional Author Information:
Blake Meyers, DNAP, CRNA blake.meyers@bryanhealthcollege.edu
Advisors:
Hadenfeldt, Sharon
Degree:
Doctoral – Other
Degree Year:
2017
Grantor:
Bryan College of Health Sciences
Abstract:

Quality improvement projects aim to address a clinical issue and subsequently improve patient care. Projects may improve or promote safe care, interpersonal care aspects, and life quality.1 The clinical issue addressed by this project was the lack of consistent, evidenced based, instructions for the resumption of breastfeeding following an anesthetic provided to mothers by anesthesia providers. This inconsistency was frustrating to patients and other health care providers within the hospital setting. The goal of this project was to bring consistency to the evidenced based recommendations for resumption of breastfeeding after outpatient anesthesia made by anesthesia providers and RNs in the Outpatient Surgery Department. A Plan-Do-Study-Act (PDSA) Model was utilized to organize and study the overall effects of this quality improvement project.

Keywords:
breast feeding adverse effects; anesthesia; Postoperative care, methods; Quality Improvement; Lactation; infants
CINAHL Headings:
Anesthesia; Breast Feeding; Breast Feeding--Education; Postoperative Care--Education; Postoperative Care; Quality Improvement; Anesthetics; Anesthetics--Pharmacokinetics; Infant
Repository Posting Date:
2017-06-26T16:09:30Z
Date of Publication:
2017-06-26

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorHadenfeldt, Sharonen
dc.contributor.authorMeyers, Blakeen
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-26T16:09:30Z-
dc.date.available2017-06-26T16:09:30Z-
dc.date.issued2017-06-26-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/621595-
dc.description.abstract<p>Quality improvement projects aim to address a clinical issue and subsequently improve patient care. Projects may improve or promote safe care, interpersonal care aspects, and life quality.<span style="font-size: xx-small;">1 </span>The clinical issue addressed by this project was the lack of consistent, evidenced based, instructions for the resumption of breastfeeding following an anesthetic provided to mothers by anesthesia providers. This inconsistency was frustrating to patients and other health care providers within the hospital setting. The goal of this project was to bring consistency to the evidenced based recommendations for resumption of breastfeeding after outpatient anesthesia made by anesthesia providers and RNs in the Outpatient Surgery Department. A Plan-Do-Study-Act (PDSA) Model was utilized to organize and study the overall effects of this quality improvement project.</p>en
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectbreast feeding adverse effectsen
dc.subjectanesthesiaen
dc.subjectPostoperative care, methodsen
dc.subjectQuality Improvementen
dc.subjectLactationen
dc.subjectinfantsen
dc.titleRecommendations for Breast Feeding Mothers after Anesthesia: a Quality Improvement Projecten_US
dc.typeOther Graduate Paperen
thesis.degree.grantorBryan College of Health Sciencesen
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral – Otheren
dc.primary-author.detailsBlake Meyers, DNAP, CRNA blake.meyers@bryanhealthcollege.eduen
thesis.degree.year2017en
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.subject.cinahlAnesthesiaen
dc.subject.cinahlBreast Feedingen
dc.subject.cinahlBreast Feeding--Educationen
dc.subject.cinahlPostoperative Care--Educationen
dc.subject.cinahlPostoperative Careen
dc.subject.cinahlQuality Improvementen
dc.subject.cinahlAnestheticsen
dc.subject.cinahlAnesthetics--Pharmacokineticsen
dc.subject.cinahlInfanten
This item is licensed under a Creative Commons License
Creative Commons
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.