The Relationships Between Critical Care Nurses' Experience, Decision-Making, and Their Attitudes Toward Physical Restraint Use

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/621603
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Poster
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
The Relationships Between Critical Care Nurses' Experience, Decision-Making, and Their Attitudes Toward Physical Restraint Use
Author(s):
Stinson, Kristi J.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Gamma Nu
Author Details:
Kristi J. Stinson, PhD, RN, MSN, APN-BC, Professional Experience: I have been a registered nurse for 21 years. I worked in the critical care environment for 10 years, both as an RN and as an APN. Upon earning my PhD, I have worked in the academic setting for the past four years. Author Summary: Dr. Kristi Stinson has been a nurse for 21 years, with her primary area of experience being the critical care environment. She is an advanced practice nurse who has worked in pain management and cardiology where she opened and ran a risk reduction clinic. Upon earning her PhD, Dr. Stinson transitioned to the academic environment where she continues to work an assistant professor tenure track at Seton Hall University in South Orange, NJ.
Abstract:

The purpose of this descriptive correlational study was to examine the relationships between and among registered nurses’ clinical experience, clinical decision-making processes, nursing practice issues with physical restraint use, and attitudes regarding physical restraint use in the critical care environment. The participants were 413 primarily white (91%), critical care nurses ranging in age from 19 to 68 (M=45.56) from across the United States. Participants were classified as experts based on Benner’s (2001) classifications, in both experience in nursing in general (88%) and in critical care (82%) in particular. Participants were recruited through the American Association of Critical Care Nurses (AACN) and completed two online surveys (Jenkins’ Clinical Decision Making in Nursing Scale (CDMNS) and The Physical Restraint Questionnaire – the Nursing Practice Issues with PR Use and Attitudes Toward PR Use subsections) via Survey Monkey™.

The results indicate that there is no strong correlation to explain any variance between attitudes toward PR use in critical care and clinical experience in nursing in general, clinical experience in critical care, clinical decision making, and nursing practice issues with PR use. This sample of nurses’ mean scores on the CDMNS were higher than noted in previous research. A moderate correlation was found between clinical decision making processes and nursing practice issues with physical restraint use. There were no differences found in any of the Benner stages of clinical experience. Nurses at all of Benner’s level from novice through expert had no significant differences in their attitudes toward PR use. Nurses with more clinical experience were more likely to have been taught content about PR use in their basic RN nursing curriculum then those with less clinical experience.

The results of this study suggest that there is a need to include education related to PR use in current nursing curricula which can lead to better clinical decisions and improved overall patient care related to PR use in critical care environments.

Keywords:
clinical experience; Clinical decision-making; critical care nurses; physical restraint use
Repository Posting Date:
29-Jun-2017
Date of Publication:
29-Jun-2017
Other Identifiers:
INRC17PST49
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
28th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Dublin, Ireland
Description:
Event Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarship

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePosteren
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.titleThe Relationships Between Critical Care Nurses' Experience, Decision-Making, and Their Attitudes Toward Physical Restraint Useen_US
dc.contributor.authorStinson, Kristi J.en
dc.contributor.departmentGamma Nuen
dc.author.detailsKristi J. Stinson, PhD, RN, MSN, APN-BC, Professional Experience: I have been a registered nurse for 21 years. I worked in the critical care environment for 10 years, both as an RN and as an APN. Upon earning my PhD, I have worked in the academic setting for the past four years. Author Summary: Dr. Kristi Stinson has been a nurse for 21 years, with her primary area of experience being the critical care environment. She is an advanced practice nurse who has worked in pain management and cardiology where she opened and ran a risk reduction clinic. Upon earning her PhD, Dr. Stinson transitioned to the academic environment where she continues to work an assistant professor tenure track at Seton Hall University in South Orange, NJ.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/621603-
dc.description.abstract<p><span>The purpose of this descriptive correlational study was to examine the relationships between and among registered nurses’ clinical experience, clinical decision-making processes, nursing practice issues with physical restraint use, and attitudes regarding physical restraint use in the critical care environment. The participants were 413 primarily white (91%), critical care nurses ranging in age from 19 to 68 (M=45.56) from across the United States. Participants were classified as experts based on Benner’s (2001) classifications, in both experience in nursing in general (88%) and in critical care (82%) in particular. Participants were recruited through the American Association of Critical Care Nurses (AACN) and completed two online surveys (Jenkins’ Clinical Decision Making in Nursing Scale (CDMNS) and The Physical Restraint Questionnaire – the Nursing Practice Issues with PR Use and Attitudes Toward PR Use subsections) via Survey Monkey™.</span></p> <p>The results indicate that there is no strong correlation to explain any variance between attitudes toward PR use in critical care and clinical experience in nursing in general, clinical experience in critical care, clinical decision making, and nursing practice issues with PR use. This sample of nurses’ mean scores on the CDMNS were higher than noted in previous research. A moderate correlation was found between clinical decision making processes and nursing practice issues with physical restraint use. There were no differences found in any of the Benner stages of clinical experience. Nurses at all of Benner’s level from novice through expert had no significant differences in their attitudes toward PR use. Nurses with more clinical experience were more likely to have been taught content about PR use in their basic RN nursing curriculum then those with less clinical experience.</p> <p>The results of this study suggest that there is a need to include education related to PR use in current nursing curricula which can lead to better clinical decisions and improved overall patient care related to PR use in critical care environments.</p>en
dc.subjectclinical experienceen
dc.subjectClinical decision-makingen
dc.subjectcritical care nursesen
dc.subjectphysical restraint useen
dc.date.available2017-06-29T17:16:09Z-
dc.date.issued2017-06-29-
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-29T17:16:09Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.name28th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.conference.locationDublin, Irelanden
dc.descriptionEvent Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarshipen
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