2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/621607
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
Transforming Nursing Students' Attitudes Toward End-of-Life Care
Other Titles:
Palliative Care in Education
Author(s):
Mahan, Pamela L.; Taggart, Helen M.; Warnock, Sherry L.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Rho Psi
Author Details:
Pamela L. Mahan, PhD, MA, BS, RN, Professional Experience: 2005-present- Associate Professor, School of Nursing, Armstrong State University, Savannah, GA. Presenter at the 16th (2005) and 22nd (2011) Sigma Theta Tau International Nursing Research Congress. International, national, and state presentations and invited presentations on topics ranging from empathy, end-of-life care, disaster preparedness, incivility, and psychological issues in the workforce. 2010 National Grant Individual and Panel Reviewer for the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Funding Opportunity Announcement (RFA) TP10-1001, CDC, Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response (OPHPR). International Study Abroad Coordinator for Italy and Belize. Author Summary: Pamela Lynn Mahan, PhD., RN is an associate professor of nursing at Armstrong State University School of Nursing. Dr. Mahan has greater than 25 years’ experience in higher education in the undergraduate and graduate nursing programs. Her teaching expertise encompasses epidemiology, public and community health, health promotion and disease prevention. Dr. Mahan has presented at the international, national, state, and local levels on work environment stressors, incivility, end-of-life care, and empathy.
Abstract:

Purpose: The purpose of this research was to examine the effect of an actual compared to a simulated hospice clinical experience on nursing students’ attitudes toward end-of-life care; and.

Methods: A pretest and posttest nonequivalent two-group design consisted of a sample of 65 undergraduate nursing students enrolled in a community health course. All students enrolled in the community health course have one day for hospice experience, and a two-hour orientation from the nurse educator at a local hospice agency. Students enrolled in the first seven weeks were paired with a hospice nurse and conducted home visits. Students enrolled in the second seven-week session participated in two simulated hospice experiences on campus. Thirty-two students were in the experimental group (simulated hospice) and 33 were in the control group (actual hospice). Attitudes toward end-of-life care was measured pre and post intervention with the The Frommelt Attitude Toward Care of the Dying (FATCOD) scale, Form B (Frommelt, 2003).

Results: The findings indicated positive attitude changes toward end-of-life care, and clinically relevant information for the development of a hospice clinical experience. After the clinical hospice experience, both groups appeared to show increases in their mean FATCOD scores possibly indicating a greater comfort with caring for dying patients. Paired t-tests for each group were conducted. The increase in the mean FATCOD score for the control group, 8.6 (SD = 9.4), was statistically significant (p < 0.001) indicating the students in the control group did experience a significant rise in their positive attitudes toward end of life care, on average. The increase in the mean FATCOD score for the experimental group was significantly smaller, 1.7 (SD = 11.4), and was not statistically significant (p = 0.42). Thus the students in the experimental group had little to no change in their mean FATCOD score indicating their positive attitudes toward end of life care was virtually unchanged

Conclusions: The findings have important implications for incorporating didactic and clinical components of end-of-life care throughout the undergraduate nursing curriculum. The clinical hospice experience can increase student comfort with caring for dying patients and families. The greatest increase in comfort with when caring for dying or end-of-life patients was from actual hospice clinical experiences. Since this is not always available, simulated experiences provide an acceptable substitute. The end-of life clinical can be a transformative experience allowing nursing students to develop greater compassion and increased decision-making skills when caring for the dying patient. Further research is needed to evaluate the efficacy of a hospice clinical compared to a simulated hospice experience.

Keywords:
End-of-Life Care; Hospice; Nursing Students
Repository Posting Date:
29-Jun-2017
Date of Publication:
29-Jun-2017
Other Identifiers:
INRC17N11
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
28th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Dublin, Ireland
Description:
Event Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarship

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.titleTransforming Nursing Students' Attitudes Toward End-of-Life Careen_US
dc.title.alternativePalliative Care in Educationen
dc.contributor.authorMahan, Pamela L.en
dc.contributor.authorTaggart, Helen M.en
dc.contributor.authorWarnock, Sherry L.en
dc.contributor.departmentRho Psien
dc.author.detailsPamela L. Mahan, PhD, MA, BS, RN, Professional Experience: 2005-present- Associate Professor, School of Nursing, Armstrong State University, Savannah, GA. Presenter at the 16th (2005) and 22nd (2011) Sigma Theta Tau International Nursing Research Congress. International, national, and state presentations and invited presentations on topics ranging from empathy, end-of-life care, disaster preparedness, incivility, and psychological issues in the workforce. 2010 National Grant Individual and Panel Reviewer for the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Funding Opportunity Announcement (RFA) TP10-1001, CDC, Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response (OPHPR). International Study Abroad Coordinator for Italy and Belize. Author Summary: Pamela Lynn Mahan, PhD., RN is an associate professor of nursing at Armstrong State University School of Nursing. Dr. Mahan has greater than 25 years’ experience in higher education in the undergraduate and graduate nursing programs. Her teaching expertise encompasses epidemiology, public and community health, health promotion and disease prevention. Dr. Mahan has presented at the international, national, state, and local levels on work environment stressors, incivility, end-of-life care, and empathy.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/621607-
dc.description.abstract<p><strong><strong>Purpose: </strong></strong><span>The purpose of this research was to examine the effect of an actual compared to a simulated hospice clinical experience on nursing students’ attitudes toward end-of-life care; and.</span><strong></strong></p> <p><strong>Methods: </strong>A pretest and posttest nonequivalent two-group design consisted of a sample of 65 undergraduate nursing students enrolled in a community health course. All students enrolled in the community health course have one day for hospice experience, and a two-hour orientation from the nurse educator at a local hospice agency. Students enrolled in the first seven weeks were paired with a hospice nurse and conducted home visits. Students enrolled in the second seven-week session participated in two simulated hospice experiences on campus. Thirty-two students were in the experimental group (simulated hospice) and 33 were in the control group (actual hospice). Attitudes toward end-of-life care was measured pre and post intervention with the The Frommelt Attitude Toward Care of the Dying (FATCOD) scale, Form B (Frommelt, 2003).</p> <p><strong>Results: </strong>The findings indicated positive attitude changes toward end-of-life care, and clinically relevant information for the development of a hospice clinical experience. After the clinical hospice experience, both groups appeared to show increases in their mean FATCOD scores possibly indicating a greater comfort with caring for dying patients. Paired t-tests for each group were conducted. The increase in the mean FATCOD score for the control group, 8.6 (SD = 9.4), was statistically significant (p < 0.001) indicating the students in the control group did experience a significant rise in their positive attitudes toward end of life care, on average. The increase in the mean FATCOD score for the experimental group was significantly smaller, 1.7 (SD = 11.4), and was not statistically significant (p = 0.42). Thus the students in the experimental group had little to no change in their mean FATCOD score indicating their positive attitudes toward end of life care was virtually unchanged</p> <p><strong>Conclusions: </strong>The findings have important implications for incorporating didactic and clinical components of end-of-life care throughout the undergraduate nursing curriculum. The clinical hospice experience can increase student comfort with caring for dying patients and families. The greatest increase in comfort with when caring for dying or end-of-life patients was from actual hospice clinical experiences. Since this is not always available, simulated experiences provide an acceptable substitute. The end-of life clinical can be a transformative experience allowing nursing students to develop greater compassion and increased decision-making skills when caring for the dying patient. Further research is needed to evaluate the efficacy of a hospice clinical compared to a simulated hospice experience.</p>en
dc.subjectEnd-of-Life Careen
dc.subjectHospiceen
dc.subjectNursing Studentsen
dc.date.available2017-06-29T18:27:05Z-
dc.date.issued2017-06-29-
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-29T18:27:05Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.name28th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.conference.locationDublin, Irelanden
dc.descriptionEvent Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarshipen
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