Symptom Clusters and Oxidative Stress in Patients With High-Grade Brain Cancers: A Longitudinal Study

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/621628
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
Symptom Clusters and Oxidative Stress in Patients With High-Grade Brain Cancers: A Longitudinal Study
Other Titles:
Factors Affecting Oncology Patients
Author(s):
Kim, Sanghee
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Lambda Alpha-at-Large
Author Details:
Sanghee Kim, PhD, MCN, RN, Professional Experience: 2007-2016 -- Nurse, Neuroscience Center, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Republic of Korea Present -- Assistant Professor, College of Nursing, Keimyung University, Daegu, Republic of Korea Author Summary: Sanghee Kim is a member of the Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society of Nursing in South Korea and has been teaching fundamental nursing, problem-based learning, and adult nursing practice as a assistant professor at the College of Nursing, Keimyung University, Daegu, South Korea since 2016.
Abstract:

Background: Cancer treatments can increase the levels of oxidative stress because of the mechanisms of cancer drugs and radiotherapy. Patients with cancer experience many concurrent symptoms, commonly referred to as “symptom clusters,” during the treatment periods. However, the relationship between oxidative stress and the symptom clusters have not been identified in patients with high-grade brain cancer.

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to identify a relationship between the symptom clusters and the levels of oxidative stress in patients with high-grade brain cancers undergoing concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT).

Methods: Patients with high-grade primary brain cancers were asked to report their symptoms using the Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale, and the level of oxidative stress was evaluated on the basis of lipid ratios such as the total cholesterol (TC) to high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol (TC/HDL-c), low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol to HDL-cholesterol (LDL-c/HDL-c), and triglycerides to HDL-cholesterol (TG/HDL-c). This prospective longitudinal survey was conducted before CCRT was initiated, and at 2–3 weeks and 4–6 weeks after the initiation of CCRT.

Results: A total of 48 patients with newly diagnosed primary malignant brain cancers were enrolled. Six symptom clusters were identified, and two symptom clusters were present at each time point (i.e., the "negative emotion and neurocognition" cluster was reported before CCRT, "negative emotion and decreased vitality" and "gastrointestinal and decreased sensation" clusters were noted at 2–3 weeks, and "body image and decreased vitality" and "gastrointestinal" clusters were identified at 4–6 weeks). The lipid ratio was an indicator of the level of risk for oxidative stress at 2–3 weeks and 4–6 weeks. The symptom clusters at 2–3 weeks and 4–6 weeks demonstrated a significant relationship with the lipid ratio.

Conclusion: Symptom clusters and levels of oxidative stress in patients with high-grade brain cancer were altered during CCRT. In addition, the levels of oxidative stress correlated with symptom clusters, and these correlations could change during the course of CCRT. Therefore, oxidative stress in patients with high-grade brain cancer should be considered for symptom management during CCRT.

Keywords:
High-grade Brain Cancers; Oxidative Stress; Symptom Clusters
Repository Posting Date:
3-Jul-2017
Date of Publication:
3-Jul-2017
Other Identifiers:
INRC17B05
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
28th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Dublin, Ireland
Description:
Event Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarship

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.titleSymptom Clusters and Oxidative Stress in Patients With High-Grade Brain Cancers: A Longitudinal Studyen_US
dc.title.alternativeFactors Affecting Oncology Patientsen
dc.contributor.authorKim, Sangheeen
dc.contributor.departmentLambda Alpha-at-Largeen
dc.author.detailsSanghee Kim, PhD, MCN, RN, Professional Experience: 2007-2016 -- Nurse, Neuroscience Center, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Republic of Korea Present -- Assistant Professor, College of Nursing, Keimyung University, Daegu, Republic of Korea Author Summary: Sanghee Kim is a member of the Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society of Nursing in South Korea and has been teaching fundamental nursing, problem-based learning, and adult nursing practice as a assistant professor at the College of Nursing, Keimyung University, Daegu, South Korea since 2016.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/621628-
dc.description.abstract<p><strong>Background: </strong><span>Cancer treatments can increase the levels of oxidative stress because of the mechanisms of cancer drugs and radiotherapy. Patients with cancer experience many concurrent symptoms, commonly referred to as “symptom clusters,” during the treatment periods. However, the relationship between oxidative stress and the symptom clusters have not been identified in patients with high-grade brain cancer.</span></p> <p><strong>Purpose: </strong>The purpose of this study was to identify a relationship between the symptom clusters and the levels of oxidative stress in patients with high-grade brain cancers undergoing concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT).</p> <p><strong>Methods: </strong>Patients with high-grade primary brain cancers were asked to report their symptoms using the Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale, and the level of oxidative stress was evaluated on the basis of lipid ratios such as the total cholesterol (TC) to high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol (TC/HDL-c), low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol to HDL-cholesterol (LDL-c/HDL-c), and triglycerides to HDL-cholesterol (TG/HDL-c). This prospective longitudinal survey was conducted before CCRT was initiated, and at 2–3 weeks and 4–6 weeks after the initiation of CCRT.</p> <p><strong>Results: </strong>A total of 48 patients with newly diagnosed primary malignant brain cancers were enrolled. Six symptom clusters were identified, and two symptom clusters were present at each time point (i.e., the "negative emotion and neurocognition" cluster was reported before CCRT, "negative emotion and decreased vitality" and "gastrointestinal and decreased sensation" clusters were noted at 2–3 weeks, and "body image and decreased vitality" and "gastrointestinal" clusters were identified at 4–6 weeks). The lipid ratio was an indicator of the level of risk for oxidative stress at 2–3 weeks and 4–6 weeks. The symptom clusters at 2–3 weeks and 4–6 weeks demonstrated a significant relationship with the lipid ratio.</p> <p><strong>Conclusion: </strong>Symptom clusters and levels of oxidative stress in patients with high-grade brain cancer were altered during CCRT. In addition, the levels of oxidative stress correlated with symptom clusters, and these correlations could change during the course of CCRT. Therefore, oxidative stress in patients with high-grade brain cancer should be considered for symptom management during CCRT.</p>en
dc.subjectHigh-grade Brain Cancersen
dc.subjectOxidative Stressen
dc.subjectSymptom Clustersen
dc.date.available2017-07-03T13:52:04Z-
dc.date.issued2017-07-03-
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-03T13:52:04Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.name28th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.conference.locationDublin, Irelanden
dc.descriptionEvent Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarshipen
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