Crisis Leadership and Decision-Making: Hospital Administration and Nurse Leaders’ Concerns for Disaster Response

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/621629
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
Crisis Leadership and Decision-Making: Hospital Administration and Nurse Leaders’ Concerns for Disaster Response
Other Titles:
Strategies in Disaster Preparedness
Author(s):
Veenema, Tener Goodwin; DeRuggiero, Katherine; Losinski, Sarah Lynn; Barnett, Daniel
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Beta Nu
Author Details:
Tener Goodwin Veenema, PhD, MSN, MPH, RN, CPNP, FAAN, Professional Experience: Associate Professor - Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing, Department of Community and Public Health; Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health Center for Refugee and Disaster Response. Baltimore, MD April 2013 - Present President and CEO - Tener Consulting Group, LLC April 2006 - Present Senior Consultant - National Commission on Children and Disasters, Office of Human Services Emergency Preparedness and Response. Administration for Children and Families. Washington, DC 2009 Associate Professor - University of Rochester School of Nursing and School of Medicine & Dentistry. Rochester, NY 2003-2008 2014 - Fellow, Leadership America 2013 - Florence Nightengale Medal (International Committee of the Red Cross) 2013 - American Journal of Nursing Book of the Year Award (Disaster Nursing and Emergency Preparedness for Chemical, Biological, and Radiological Terrorism and Other Hazards) 2012 - Distinguished Alumni Leadership Award 2008 - Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Senior Fellow in Nursing Policy and Philanthropy Author Summary: Dr. Veenema is internationally recognized for her work in disaster and public health preparedness. She is editor of Disaster Nursing and Emergency Preparedness for Chemical, Biological and Radiological Terrorism, serves as senior scientist on the Red Cross National Scientific Advisory Board, elected Fellow in the National Academies of Practice and American Academy of Nursing. She was awarded the Florence Nightingale International Red Crescent Medal of Honor, the highest international award a nurse can receive.
Abstract:

Purpose:

 The purpose of this study was to characterize and explore the essential elements of effective hospital and nursing leadership during disasters and MCIs and to identify those events of greatest concern for response. Disaster and mass casualty incidents (MCIs) impose a huge burden on health care leaders. These events create a sudden, unanticipated demand for care referred to as ‘patient surge’ that has the potential to quickly overwhelm a hospital’s capacity to function properly. The demand for health care services exceeds capacity to respond and the institution’s normally acceptable patterns of operations and logistics are disrupted. Strong crisis leadership is critical for timely, effective and coordinated response. This requires that hospital administration and nursing leadership are competent in making rapid and complex decisions – often in the absence of complete information and involving the allocation of scarce resources (staff, medical equipment and supplies, pharmaceuticals, etc). It requires implementation of crisis standards of care.

Methods:

 A series of structured focus groups was conducted with a purposive sample of hospital administrators (n=36) and nurse leaders (n=17) in a large urban hospital in the U.S. Northeast widely recognized for its expertise in hospital emergency preparedness. Participants were asked a series of semi-structured questions related to observations of crisis leadership during recent disaster and MCI events. Data were collated and analyzed to determine events of greatest concern, impact of event on leadership decision-making, and perceived capacity for organizational surge.

Results:

The results suggest hospital administration and nurse leaders harbor serious concerns regarding crisis leadership competence and organizational capacity to surge up in response to large scale community violence/civil unrest, biological event/pandemics, and acts of terrorism (fire/bombings/active shooters) that result in a mass tragedy. The results of hospital administration and nursing leadership decisions have the potential to directly impact staff and patient safety and quality of care and ultimately, patient outcomes. As such, there is compelling need to prepare hospital administrators and nurse leaders for crisis conditions resulting from disasters and MCIs.

Conclusion:

Disaster and mass casualty incidents (MCIs) impose a huge burden on health care leaders and strong crisis leadership is critical for timely, effective and coordinated response. The purpose of this study was to characterize and explore the essential elements of effective hospital and nursing leadership during disasters and MCIs and to identify those events of greatest concern for response. The results suggest hospital administration and nurse leaders harbor serious concerns regarding crisis leadership competence and organizational capacity to surge up in response to large scale community violence/civil unrest, biological event/pandemics, and acts of terrorism (fire/bombings/active shooters) that result in a mass tragedy.

Keywords:
disaster; hospital; leadership
Repository Posting Date:
3-Jul-2017
Date of Publication:
3-Jul-2017
Other Identifiers:
INRC17A16
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
28th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Dublin, Ireland
Description:
Event Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarship

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.titleCrisis Leadership and Decision-Making: Hospital Administration and Nurse Leaders’ Concerns for Disaster Responseen_US
dc.title.alternativeStrategies in Disaster Preparednessen
dc.contributor.authorVeenema, Tener Goodwinen
dc.contributor.authorDeRuggiero, Katherineen
dc.contributor.authorLosinski, Sarah Lynnen
dc.contributor.authorBarnett, Danielen
dc.contributor.departmentBeta Nuen
dc.author.detailsTener Goodwin Veenema, PhD, MSN, MPH, RN, CPNP, FAAN, Professional Experience: Associate Professor - Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing, Department of Community and Public Health; Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health Center for Refugee and Disaster Response. Baltimore, MD April 2013 - Present President and CEO - Tener Consulting Group, LLC April 2006 - Present Senior Consultant - National Commission on Children and Disasters, Office of Human Services Emergency Preparedness and Response. Administration for Children and Families. Washington, DC 2009 Associate Professor - University of Rochester School of Nursing and School of Medicine & Dentistry. Rochester, NY 2003-2008 2014 - Fellow, Leadership America 2013 - Florence Nightengale Medal (International Committee of the Red Cross) 2013 - American Journal of Nursing Book of the Year Award (Disaster Nursing and Emergency Preparedness for Chemical, Biological, and Radiological Terrorism and Other Hazards) 2012 - Distinguished Alumni Leadership Award 2008 - Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Senior Fellow in Nursing Policy and Philanthropy Author Summary: Dr. Veenema is internationally recognized for her work in disaster and public health preparedness. She is editor of Disaster Nursing and Emergency Preparedness for Chemical, Biological and Radiological Terrorism, serves as senior scientist on the Red Cross National Scientific Advisory Board, elected Fellow in the National Academies of Practice and American Academy of Nursing. She was awarded the Florence Nightingale International Red Crescent Medal of Honor, the highest international award a nurse can receive.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/621629-
dc.description.abstract<p><strong>Purpose:</strong></p> <p> The purpose of this study was to characterize and explore the essential elements of effective hospital and nursing leadership during disasters and MCIs and to identify those events of greatest concern for response. Disaster and mass casualty incidents (MCIs) impose a huge burden on health care leaders. These events create a sudden, unanticipated demand for care referred to as ‘patient surge’ that has the potential to quickly overwhelm a hospital’s capacity to function properly. The demand for health care services exceeds capacity to respond and the institution’s normally acceptable patterns of operations and logistics are disrupted. Strong crisis leadership is critical for timely, effective and coordinated response. This requires that hospital administration and nursing leadership are competent in making rapid and complex decisions – often in the absence of complete information and involving the allocation of scarce resources (staff, medical equipment and supplies, pharmaceuticals, etc). It requires implementation of crisis standards of care.</p> <p><strong>Methods:</strong></p> <p> A series of structured focus groups was conducted with a purposive sample of hospital administrators (n=36) and nurse leaders (n=17) in a large urban hospital in the U.S. Northeast widely recognized for its expertise in hospital emergency preparedness. Participants were asked a series of semi-structured questions related to observations of crisis leadership during recent disaster and MCI events. Data were collated and analyzed to determine events of greatest concern, impact of event on leadership decision-making, and perceived capacity for organizational surge.</p> <p><strong>Results:</strong></p> <p>The results suggest hospital administration and nurse leaders harbor serious concerns regarding crisis leadership competence and organizational capacity to surge up in response to large scale community violence/civil unrest, biological event/pandemics, and acts of terrorism (fire/bombings/active shooters) that result in a mass tragedy. The results of hospital administration and nursing leadership decisions have the potential to directly impact staff and patient safety and quality of care and ultimately, patient outcomes. As such, there is compelling need to prepare hospital administrators and nurse leaders for crisis conditions resulting from disasters and MCIs.</p> <p><strong>Conclusion:</strong></p> <p>Disaster and mass casualty incidents (MCIs) impose a huge burden on health care leaders and strong crisis leadership is critical for timely, effective and coordinated response. The purpose of this study was to characterize and explore the essential elements of effective hospital and nursing leadership during disasters and MCIs and to identify those events of greatest concern for response. The results suggest hospital administration and nurse leaders harbor serious concerns regarding crisis leadership competence and organizational capacity to surge up in response to large scale community violence/civil unrest, biological event/pandemics, and acts of terrorism (fire/bombings/active shooters) that result in a mass tragedy.</p>en
dc.subjectdisasteren
dc.subjecthospitalen
dc.subjectleadershipen
dc.date.available2017-07-03T14:26:26Z-
dc.date.issued2017-07-03-
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-03T14:26:26Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.name28th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.conference.locationDublin, Irelanden
dc.descriptionEvent Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarshipen
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.