Prevalence and Predictors of Intimate Partner Violence in Mexican and Non-Mexican Hispanic Women from SEPA

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/621680
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
Prevalence and Predictors of Intimate Partner Violence in Mexican and Non-Mexican Hispanic Women from SEPA
Other Titles:
Conversations on Intimate Partner Violence
Author(s):
Montano, Nilda (Nena) Peragallo; Kim, Young Ju; Gonzalez-Guarda, Rosa M.; Cianelli, Rosina; Villegas, Natalia
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Theta Epsilon
Author Details:
Nilda (Nena) Peragallo Montano, DrPH, RN, FAAN, Professional Experience: Nilda (Nena) P. Peragallo Montano, DrPH, RN, FAAN, is Dean and Professor, University of Miami School of Nursing and Health Studies. A recognized nursing scientist specializing in health disparities and culturally competent interventions with minority populations, She has devoted her 35+ year research and academic career to improving the health status of minorities and other medically underserved groups. Peragallo has a solid record of successful competitive research funding. From 2007-2015 she served as Director and Principal Investigator of the Center of Excellence for Health Disparities Research: El Centro, the first NIH P50 center grant awarded to a school of nursing. She is currently Co-Principal Investigator of El Centro, which has been funded continuously by the National Institutes of Health/National Institute of Minority Health and Health Disparities since its inception. She is also Director of the school’s World Health Organization designated Collaborating Centre for Nursing Human Resources Development and Patient Safety. Author Summary: Dean and Professor, University of Miami School of Nursing and Health Studies. Peragallo Montano has devoted her 35+ year research and academic career to improving the health status of minorities and other medically underserved groups. Peragallo has a solid record of successful competitive research funding. She is a fellow of the American Academy of Nursing, a member of Sigma Theta Tau International, and an inductee of the STTI Nurse Researcher Hall of Fame.
Abstract:

Purpose:  The purpose of the study was to examine prevalence and difference of intimate partner violence (IPV) between Mexican and non-Mexican Hispanic women residing in the United States. In addition, this study investigated what factors predict IPV in each of two Hispanic subgroups.

Methods:  All of measures were drawn from baseline data of two separate SEPA (Salud-Health, Educacion-Education, Prevencion-Prevention and Autocuidado-Self-care) projects. The SEPA projects are culturally specific, theoretically based group HIV-risk reduction interventions for adult Hispanic women. They consist of five small-group sessions covering HIV and STI prevention, violence prevention, condom use, and communication with partner. The SEPA I includes 529 Mexican Hispanic women in Chicago. The SEPA II has 508 non-Mexican Hispanic women in South Florida. The differences and predictabilities of sociodemographic factors (age, education, income, employment, insurance status, number of partner, age difference with partner), acculturation, depressive symptoms, self-esteem, protective sexual communication with partner, alcohol or drug abuse, and physical or sexual abuse during childhood on IPV were assessed by using t-test, chi-square test, and logistic multivariate regression. IPV in the past 3months was measured with 12 questions of the Revised Conflict Tactics Scale. Any positive responses to one or more questions relating to physical or psychological abuse were categorized as being exposed to IPV.

Results:  Although the prevalence of IPV was very high in both groups, it was significantly higher in Mexican Hispanic women (79.1%) than non-Mexican Hispanic women (63.5%). Mexican Hispanic women were significantly younger, less educated, less Americanized, poorer, more sexually abused during childhood, and more likely to have partners with a heavy drinking than non-Mexican Hispanic women. Additionally, they had significantly more depressive symptoms and lower self-esteem. Depression and partners’ heavy drinking were significant risk factors for IPV in women born in Mexico. Educational years, depression, and partners’ alcohol or drug abuse were predictors in women born in other Latin American countries than Mexico.

Conclusion: IPV Interventions should address the culturally specific needs of Hispanic women from different nationalities and geographical locations in the U.S.

Keywords:
Hispanic; Intervention; Intimate Partner Violence
Repository Posting Date:
6-Jul-2017
Date of Publication:
6-Jul-2017
Other Identifiers:
INRC17L08
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
28th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Dublin, Ireland
Description:
Event Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarship

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.titlePrevalence and Predictors of Intimate Partner Violence in Mexican and Non-Mexican Hispanic Women from SEPAen_US
dc.title.alternativeConversations on Intimate Partner Violenceen
dc.contributor.authorMontano, Nilda (Nena) Peragalloen
dc.contributor.authorKim, Young Juen
dc.contributor.authorGonzalez-Guarda, Rosa M.en
dc.contributor.authorCianelli, Rosinaen
dc.contributor.authorVillegas, Nataliaen
dc.contributor.departmentTheta Epsilonen
dc.author.detailsNilda (Nena) Peragallo Montano, DrPH, RN, FAAN, Professional Experience: Nilda (Nena) P. Peragallo Montano, DrPH, RN, FAAN, is Dean and Professor, University of Miami School of Nursing and Health Studies. A recognized nursing scientist specializing in health disparities and culturally competent interventions with minority populations, She has devoted her 35+ year research and academic career to improving the health status of minorities and other medically underserved groups. Peragallo has a solid record of successful competitive research funding. From 2007-2015 she served as Director and Principal Investigator of the Center of Excellence for Health Disparities Research: El Centro, the first NIH P50 center grant awarded to a school of nursing. She is currently Co-Principal Investigator of El Centro, which has been funded continuously by the National Institutes of Health/National Institute of Minority Health and Health Disparities since its inception. She is also Director of the school’s World Health Organization designated Collaborating Centre for Nursing Human Resources Development and Patient Safety. Author Summary: Dean and Professor, University of Miami School of Nursing and Health Studies. Peragallo Montano has devoted her 35+ year research and academic career to improving the health status of minorities and other medically underserved groups. Peragallo has a solid record of successful competitive research funding. She is a fellow of the American Academy of Nursing, a member of Sigma Theta Tau International, and an inductee of the STTI Nurse Researcher Hall of Fame.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/621680-
dc.description.abstract<p><strong>Purpose: </strong><span> The purpose of the study was to examine prevalence and difference of intimate partner violence (IPV) between Mexican and non-Mexican Hispanic women residing in the United States. In addition, this study investigated what factors predict IPV in each of two Hispanic subgroups.</span></p> <p><strong>Methods: </strong> All of measures were drawn from baseline data of two separate SEPA (Salud-Health, Educacion-Education, Prevencion-Prevention and Autocuidado-Self-care) projects. The SEPA projects are culturally specific, theoretically based group HIV-risk reduction interventions for adult Hispanic women. They consist of five small-group sessions covering HIV and STI prevention, violence prevention, condom use, and communication with partner. The SEPA I includes 529 Mexican Hispanic women in Chicago. The SEPA II has 508 non-Mexican Hispanic women in South Florida. The differences and predictabilities of sociodemographic factors (age, education, income, employment, insurance status, number of partner, age difference with partner), acculturation, depressive symptoms, self-esteem, protective sexual communication with partner, alcohol or drug abuse, and physical or sexual abuse during childhood on IPV were assessed by using t-test, chi-square test, and logistic multivariate regression. IPV in the past 3months was measured with 12 questions of the Revised Conflict Tactics Scale. Any positive responses to one or more questions relating to physical or psychological abuse were categorized as being exposed to IPV.</p> <p><strong>Results: </strong> Although the prevalence of IPV was very high in both groups, it was significantly higher in Mexican Hispanic women (79.1%) than non-Mexican Hispanic women (63.5%). Mexican Hispanic women were significantly younger, less educated, less Americanized, poorer, more sexually abused during childhood, and more likely to have partners with a heavy drinking than non-Mexican Hispanic women. Additionally, they had significantly more depressive symptoms and lower self-esteem. Depression and partners’ heavy drinking were significant risk factors for IPV in women born in Mexico. Educational years, depression, and partners’ alcohol or drug abuse were predictors in women born in other Latin American countries than Mexico.</p> <p><strong>Conclusion: </strong>IPV Interventions should address the culturally specific needs of Hispanic women from different nationalities and geographical locations in the U.S.</p>en
dc.subjectHispanicen
dc.subjectInterventionen
dc.subjectIntimate Partner Violenceen
dc.date.available2017-07-06T15:05:25Z-
dc.date.issued2017-07-06-
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-06T15:05:25Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.name28th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.conference.locationDublin, Irelanden
dc.descriptionEvent Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarshipen
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