Pediatric Emergency Department (PED) Simulation: Undergraduate Nursing Students' Experience

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/621702
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
Pediatric Emergency Department (PED) Simulation: Undergraduate Nursing Students' Experience
Other Titles:
Simulation in Nursing Education
Author(s):
Schultz, Mary Rochelle; Dello Stritto, Rita Ann
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Beta Beta (Houston)
Author Details:
Mary Rochelle Schultz, MSN, RN, CPNP-PC, Professional Experience: I have been a pediatric nurse practitioner since 1992. I have worked in a school-based clinic and primary pediatrics treating a variety of patients for both sick & well visits as well as performed adolescent psychiatric history and physicals and ADHD evaluations. I have been on faculty at Texas Woman’s University since 1999 where I have taught primarily undergraduate pediatrics. Since 2015 I have served as co-director of the undergraduate nursing program. I am certified as a Pediatric Nurse Practitioner by the National Certifying Board of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners and Nurses and licensed as a Registered Nurse and Advance Practice Nurse with the Texas Board of Nursing. I am a member of the National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners and Sigma Theta Tau, the International Honor Society of Nursing. Author Summary: Rochelle Schultz is a pediatric nurse practitioner with almost 25 years of experience in a variety of settings. Ms. Schultz has been on faculty at Texas Woman’s University since 1999 and currently is the co-director of the undergraduate nursing program. She has been a leader in incorporating simulation into the undergraduate curriculum.
Abstract:

Background: Finding clinical placements for undergraduate nursing students is an increasing challenge. The National Council of State Boards of Nursing Simulation Study (2014) found that high quality simulation produces educational outcomes comparable to traditional clinical hours. Students report that high fidelity simulation has a positive impact on their problem solving, is more realistic, and makes learning more active than low fidelity simulation (Butler, Veltre, Brady, 2009). The undergraduate students in the simulation experience have participated in multiple simulations applying the space industries integrated model to a simulated hospital environment (Ayers, et al., 2015). Students play the role of patients. Using live models or standardized patients in simulation increases students’ critical thinking and communication skills (Maharaj, 2015). This same model of utilizing students as patient actors in a simulated hospital was implemented in the pediatric course. Twenty students spent 50% of their clinical hours in the simulation lab and 50% in the children’s hospital. However, we discovered that students had difficulty accepting their peers, playing the pediatric patient role, as realistic. Students playing the patient role limited the age range of the scenarios that could be implemented to older school age or adolescent patients.

Intervention: A high fidelity pediatric emergency department simulation (PEDS), with children of all ages playing the patient role, was developed as an innovative solution to these problems. Volunteer children and parents played the patient and parent roles. Patients presented with a variety of scripted illnesses and injuries and were moulaged accordingly. Twenty undergraduate students rotated through the roles of triage and bedside nurses. Faculty wrote the scripts, coordinated the activities, and moulaged patients. Nurse practitioner faculty played the providers.

Evaluation: Students response to the experience was positive. The majority of the students expressed that the PEDS was an excellent learning experience. They were able to interact with children of a variety of ages. Students in the PEDS were able to function independently in a safe environment.

Keywords:
Live Patient Models; Nursing Education; Pediatric Emergency Department Simulation
Repository Posting Date:
6-Jul-2017
Date of Publication:
6-Jul-2017
Other Identifiers:
INRC17O08
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
28th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Dublin, Ireland
Description:
Event Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarship

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.titlePediatric Emergency Department (PED) Simulation: Undergraduate Nursing Students' Experienceen_US
dc.title.alternativeSimulation in Nursing Educationen
dc.contributor.authorSchultz, Mary Rochelleen
dc.contributor.authorDello Stritto, Rita Annen
dc.contributor.departmentBeta Beta (Houston)en
dc.author.detailsMary Rochelle Schultz, MSN, RN, CPNP-PC, Professional Experience: I have been a pediatric nurse practitioner since 1992. I have worked in a school-based clinic and primary pediatrics treating a variety of patients for both sick & well visits as well as performed adolescent psychiatric history and physicals and ADHD evaluations. I have been on faculty at Texas Woman’s University since 1999 where I have taught primarily undergraduate pediatrics. Since 2015 I have served as co-director of the undergraduate nursing program. I am certified as a Pediatric Nurse Practitioner by the National Certifying Board of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners and Nurses and licensed as a Registered Nurse and Advance Practice Nurse with the Texas Board of Nursing. I am a member of the National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners and Sigma Theta Tau, the International Honor Society of Nursing. Author Summary: Rochelle Schultz is a pediatric nurse practitioner with almost 25 years of experience in a variety of settings. Ms. Schultz has been on faculty at Texas Woman’s University since 1999 and currently is the co-director of the undergraduate nursing program. She has been a leader in incorporating simulation into the undergraduate curriculum.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/621702-
dc.description.abstract<p><strong>Background:</strong><span> Finding clinical placements for undergraduate nursing students is an increasing challenge. The National Council of State Boards of Nursing Simulation Study (2014) found that high quality simulation produces educational outcomes comparable to traditional clinical hours. Students report that high fidelity simulation has a positive impact on their problem solving, is more realistic, and makes learning more active than low fidelity simulation (Butler, Veltre, Brady, 2009). The undergraduate students in the simulation experience have participated in multiple simulations applying the space industries integrated model to a simulated hospital environment (Ayers, et al., 2015). Students play the role of patients. Using live models or standardized patients in simulation increases students’ critical thinking and communication skills (Maharaj, 2015). This same model of utilizing students as patient actors in a simulated hospital was implemented in the pediatric course. Twenty students spent 50% of their clinical hours in the simulation lab and 50% in the children’s hospital. However, we discovered that students had difficulty accepting their peers, playing the pediatric patient role, as realistic. Students playing the patient role limited the age range of the scenarios that could be implemented to older school age or adolescent patients.</span></p> <p><strong>Intervention:</strong> A high fidelity pediatric emergency department simulation (PEDS), with children of all ages playing the patient role, was developed as an innovative solution to these problems. Volunteer children and parents played the patient and parent roles. Patients presented with a variety of scripted illnesses and injuries and were moulaged accordingly. Twenty undergraduate students rotated through the roles of triage and bedside nurses. Faculty wrote the scripts, coordinated the activities, and moulaged patients. Nurse practitioner faculty played the providers.</p> <p><strong>Evaluation: </strong>Students response to the experience was positive. The majority of the students expressed that the PEDS was an excellent learning experience. They were able to interact with children of a variety of ages. Students in the PEDS were able to function independently in a safe environment.</p>en
dc.subjectLive Patient Modelsen
dc.subjectNursing Educationen
dc.subjectPediatric Emergency Department Simulationen
dc.date.available2017-07-06T20:55:46Z-
dc.date.issued2017-07-06-
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-06T20:55:46Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.name28th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.conference.locationDublin, Irelanden
dc.descriptionEvent Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarshipen
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