2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/621721
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
MRI Outcomes of Emotional Regulation: A Feasibility Study
Other Titles:
Competencies in Psychiatric Health
Author(s):
Marshall, Brenda
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Alpha Zeta
Author Details:
Brenda Marshall, EdD, MSN, APN-BC, NE-BC, ANEF, Professional Experience: Marshall, B. 2011 - present: Associate Professor, coordinator of the Doctor of Nursing Program (DNP) at William Paterson University of NJ. 2009- 2011 EHMC Director of EBP, expertise in developing and implementing behavior change programs, responsible for implementation of EBP. 2004-2009 Montclair State University - professor. 2000- present: Director Learn 2 Choose Inc. Center for Social Emotional Learning, Providing consulting and educational classes- 2/2009 psychotherapy. Marshall, B (2009) The Role of the Psychiatric Nurse Practitioner in Disaster Response, Journal of Emergency Management. October. Marshall, B (2007) Major Depression (Chapter), Encyclopedia of Social Problems, Sage Publications Marshall, B (2006) Chronic Diseases (chapter), Encyclopedia of Social Problems, Sage Publications Marshall, B (2008) Using Technology to Change Attitudes, TurningPoint Regional Conference, University of Maryland, March 2008 Marshall, B. and Kahn, P (2007). “Tools of 21st Century Educational Technology: ipods, virtual classrooms and clickers”. The Society for Prevention Research, Washington, DC. May 2,2007 Author Summary: Dr. Marshall is a Fulbright Specialist teaching higher education mental health education and psychiatric nursing. She is a fellow of the Academy of Nursing Education, a board certified psychiatric nurse practitioner, and author. Her research focus is in substance use and depression, emotion regulation and fMRI evaluation, and deep learning pedagogy.
Abstract:

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate neuronal responses to emotional regulation in healthy adults when exposed to static faces and changing contexts. Emotional regulation is the array of automatic and controlled strategies that either attaches meaning to, or directs attention away from, an event. This project investigated, through the use of a functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI), the impact of stories on visual cues, and brain activity in the areas of the brain devoted to memory and thoughtful consideration. The hypothesis was that the changing of the context, despite the attachment of those stories to the same surprised faces, would change the neuronal connections related to memory and trust.

 Methods:   Ten participants were scanned with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) as they were exposed to repeating neutral and surprised faces that were coupled with changing contexts of happy stories or scary stories. The volunteers were exposed to 25 neurtral faces and 25 surprised faces with no story. Then the same 25 surprised faces were coupled with five sets of different stories (happy or scary). The process duration in the fMRI was about 25 minutes.

Results:   Five men and five women were scanned. Images were processed, aggregated, and compared for changes in neuronal firing and regional activity. Results indicated Increased regional activation when individuals were exposed to scary and happy stories while looking at static faces compared to no story exposure. Additionally, exposure to scary stories resulted in increased activity compared to happy stories. Regions of activation included the posterior cingulate process, occipital fusiform gyrus, precuneus, cingulate gyrus and intra-calcarine cortex.

Conclusion: The findings support previous studies identifying the posterior cingulate cortex as engaging in a successful mediating role related to memory and emotional regulation. This study reflects the brain's reappraisal mechanisms that exist when patients experience psychotherapeutic reframing and can also be reflective of the process occurring during the establishment of the therapeutic relationship. This study indicates that way a diagnosis is presented to a patient, combined with the facial expression of the healthcare worker can impact the patient’s ability to retain information and to understand and process it.

Keywords:
Emotion Regulation; Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging; Therapeutic Alliance
Repository Posting Date:
7-Jul-2017
Date of Publication:
7-Jul-2017
Other Identifiers:
INRC17L04
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
28th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Dublin, Ireland
Description:
Event Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarship

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.titleMRI Outcomes of Emotional Regulation: A Feasibility Studyen_US
dc.title.alternativeCompetencies in Psychiatric Healthen
dc.contributor.authorMarshall, Brendaen
dc.contributor.departmentAlpha Zetaen
dc.author.detailsBrenda Marshall, EdD, MSN, APN-BC, NE-BC, ANEF, Professional Experience: Marshall, B. 2011 - present: Associate Professor, coordinator of the Doctor of Nursing Program (DNP) at William Paterson University of NJ. 2009- 2011 EHMC Director of EBP, expertise in developing and implementing behavior change programs, responsible for implementation of EBP. 2004-2009 Montclair State University - professor. 2000- present: Director Learn 2 Choose Inc. Center for Social Emotional Learning, Providing consulting and educational classes- 2/2009 psychotherapy. Marshall, B (2009) The Role of the Psychiatric Nurse Practitioner in Disaster Response, Journal of Emergency Management. October. Marshall, B (2007) Major Depression (Chapter), Encyclopedia of Social Problems, Sage Publications Marshall, B (2006) Chronic Diseases (chapter), Encyclopedia of Social Problems, Sage Publications Marshall, B (2008) Using Technology to Change Attitudes, TurningPoint Regional Conference, University of Maryland, March 2008 Marshall, B. and Kahn, P (2007). “Tools of 21st Century Educational Technology: ipods, virtual classrooms and clickers”. The Society for Prevention Research, Washington, DC. May 2,2007 Author Summary: Dr. Marshall is a Fulbright Specialist teaching higher education mental health education and psychiatric nursing. She is a fellow of the Academy of Nursing Education, a board certified psychiatric nurse practitioner, and author. Her research focus is in substance use and depression, emotion regulation and fMRI evaluation, and deep learning pedagogy.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/621721-
dc.description.abstract<p><strong><strong>Purpose: </strong></strong><span>The purpose of this study was to evaluate neuronal responses to emotional regulation in healthy adults when exposed to static faces and changing contexts. Emotional regulation is the array of automatic and controlled strategies that either attaches meaning to, or directs attention away from, an event. This project investigated, through the use of a functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI), the impact of stories on visual cues, and brain activity in the areas of the brain devoted to memory and thoughtful consideration. The hypothesis was that the changing of the context, despite the attachment of those stories to the same surprised faces, would change the neuronal connections related to memory and trust.</span></p> <p><strong> <strong>Methods: </strong> </strong> Ten participants were scanned with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) as they were exposed to repeating neutral and surprised faces that were coupled with changing contexts of happy stories or scary stories. The volunteers were exposed to 25 neurtral faces and 25 surprised faces with no story. Then the same 25 surprised faces were coupled with five sets of different stories (happy or scary). The process duration in the fMRI was about 25 minutes.</p> <p><strong><strong>Results: </strong> </strong> Five men and five women were scanned. Images were processed, aggregated, and compared for changes in neuronal firing and regional activity. Results indicated Increased regional activation when individuals were exposed to scary and happy stories while looking at static faces compared to no story exposure. Additionally, exposure to scary stories resulted in increased activity compared to happy stories. Regions of activation included the posterior cingulate process, occipital fusiform gyrus, precuneus, cingulate gyrus and intra-calcarine cortex.</p> <p><strong>Conclusion: </strong>The findings support previous studies identifying the posterior cingulate cortex as engaging in a successful mediating role related to memory and emotional regulation. This study reflects the brain's reappraisal mechanisms that exist when patients experience psychotherapeutic reframing and can also be reflective of the process occurring during the establishment of the therapeutic relationship. This study indicates that way a diagnosis is presented to a patient, combined with the facial expression of the healthcare worker can impact the patient’s ability to retain information and to understand and process it.</p>en
dc.subjectEmotion Regulationen
dc.subjectFunctional Magnetic Resonance Imagingen
dc.subjectTherapeutic Allianceen
dc.date.available2017-07-07T20:11:40Z-
dc.date.issued2017-07-07-
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-07T20:11:40Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.name28th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.conference.locationDublin, Irelanden
dc.descriptionEvent Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarshipen
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