Participatory Approach to Build Capacity: Nurse-Led Research to Overcome Insufficient Mobility in Hospitalized Older Adults

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/621722
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
Participatory Approach to Build Capacity: Nurse-Led Research to Overcome Insufficient Mobility in Hospitalized Older Adults
Other Titles:
Transitions in Care of the Older Adult
Author(s):
Dermody, Gordana; Bryant, Ruth A.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Delta Chi-at-Large
Author Details:
Gordana Dermody, PhD, RN, CNL, Professional Experience: Currently I am a Clinical Assistant Professor at Washington State University I teach in the DNP program. Specifically I teach translation of evidence into practice, and evidence-based practice courses. My research is focused on the prevention of functional decline through improved physical activity in older adults across the care continuum. Author Summary: Gordana (Dana) Dermody is a Clinical Assistant Professor at WSU College of Nursing. Her program of research is aimed at promoting physical activity in older adults across the care continuum to preserve physical function, and prevent immobility-related adverse health outcomes. Dana is interested in overcoming hospital-based system barriers to promoting physical activity through novel clinical applications of existing PA sensor technology integrated with web-based applications.
Abstract:

Purpose: The objectives of this presentation are to: 1) Describe the participatory approach used to involve bedside nurses, and other disciplines in the conduct of nurse-led research to overcome insufficient older adult mobilization. 2) Discuss how this participatory approach served as a spring-board to build capacity for additional nurse-led research at the bedside.

Background: It is well-known that hospitalized older adults do not receive the mobility they need (Barber et al., 2015; Fisher, Graham, Ottenbacher, Deer, & Ostir, 2016). Due to musculoskeletal changes that accompany aging, this population is at increased risk for accelerated muscle loss and weakness which contributes to functional decline, and other adverse health outcomes (Cruz-Jentoft et al., 2010). Studies conducted in a variety of developed countries, including Australia, Canada, England, Ireland, Israel and the United States, show that concerns about the insufficient promotion of mobility in hospitalized older adults exist on an international scale. The urgency to address the mobility needs of older adults is heightened by the demographic shift that is occurring due to our aging population. A recent international research study reported that the growth of older adults 65 years and older is accelerating in multiple developed as well as developing nations (He, Goodkind, & Kowal, 2016).

Busy inpatient units have been described as chaotic settings (Catchpole, 2013). In addition, within this environment, nurses encounter a variety of barriers to promoting mobility in older adults (Hoyer, Brotman, Chan, & Needham, 2015). The literature suggests that there is a convergence of knowledge, attitude and external barriers that contributes to the vexing problem of insufficient mobility (Hoyer et al., 2015). While the incongruence between mobility needed and the mobility promoted in hospitalized older adults has been studied for decades—and literature has pointed a critical finger at nurses for failing to promote mobility—little is known about whether the barriers that nurses encounter could explain nurses’ mobility-promoting behavior. The accelerated rise in the number of older adults necessitates that clinical and academic nurses work collaboratively to take the lead to overcome potential barriers to nurse-promoted mobility for this vulnerable population by becoming involved in the design and conduct clinical research.

Two key principles to participatory research are to engage partners in all phases of research and to build on existing goals of the clinical setting (Schmittdiel, Brumbach & Selby, 2010). The initial project stemmed from a staff identified need, which was substantiated by the Nurse Manager as a priority and then the study was designed and conducted by the nurse researcher with the participation of bedside nurses. Subsequent projects were based on findings from the initial study and designed collaboratively with the staff and the nurse researcher.

Methods: A participatory approach was used to engage nursing staff in the research process. A team of hospital nurses were involved in discussions addressing all phases of research including data collection methods. To recruit nurse participants for the initial study, informational group discussion sessions were conducted which served to foster an awareness and enthusiasm among the nursing staff. Several additional strategies were employed to nurture and sustain engagement of the nursing staff (Roll et al, 2013). Regular communications were maintained with the nursing staff through informal (i.e., being present on the unit) and formal methods (i.e., unit-based newsletter or email, unit-based council meetings). Study procedures were integrated into daily patient care such as using the informational patient “white board” for communicating mobility goal setting. Nursing staff co-investigators were encouraged and supported to submit abstracts at local, regional and national professional meetings to disseminate findings.

Results: Numerous research-based activities have been generated stemming from the original study purpose to identify and then minimize barriers, and increase nurse-led patient mobilization. Between June 2015 and December of 2016 three research projects were conducted, and two other studies are currently in progress. In addition, 3 manuscripts are under review. Furthermore, findings have been disseminated though posters and podium presentations in a variety of venues including hospital-based symposia, national research conferences and professional nursing organizations. Contributing authors of these research activities are interdisciplinary and include bedside nurses, nurse mangers, physical therapists, volunteers, nurse-researchers, and data analysts. Using a participatory approach is useful to build capacity for nurses and other disciplines to collaboratively address clinical issues and to facilitate nurse-led research at the bedside. In addition, using this approach has stimulated an ongoing dialogue about research findings and has fostered a curiosity about next steps. This has served as a springboard for future nurse-led research to overcome insufficient older adult mobilization.

Conclusion: A participatory approach to clinical research capitalizes on the strengths and knowledge of the bedside nurse and the researcher to design and conduct clinically relevant research. This partnership fosters a culture of curiosity and serves as a springboard to generate additional researchable clinical questions. In addition, this approach provides numerous opportunities for the nursing staff to develop their presentation skills.

Keywords:
Engaging bedside nurses in nurse-led research; Promotion of mobility in hospitalized older adults; Using a participatory interdisciplinary approach to conduct nurse-led research
Repository Posting Date:
7-Jul-2017
Date of Publication:
7-Jul-2017
Other Identifiers:
INRC17H05
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
28th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Dublin, Ireland
Description:
Event Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarship

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.titleParticipatory Approach to Build Capacity: Nurse-Led Research to Overcome Insufficient Mobility in Hospitalized Older Adultsen_US
dc.title.alternativeTransitions in Care of the Older Adulten
dc.contributor.authorDermody, Gordanaen
dc.contributor.authorBryant, Ruth A.en
dc.contributor.departmentDelta Chi-at-Largeen
dc.author.detailsGordana Dermody, PhD, RN, CNL, Professional Experience: Currently I am a Clinical Assistant Professor at Washington State University I teach in the DNP program. Specifically I teach translation of evidence into practice, and evidence-based practice courses. My research is focused on the prevention of functional decline through improved physical activity in older adults across the care continuum. Author Summary: Gordana (Dana) Dermody is a Clinical Assistant Professor at WSU College of Nursing. Her program of research is aimed at promoting physical activity in older adults across the care continuum to preserve physical function, and prevent immobility-related adverse health outcomes. Dana is interested in overcoming hospital-based system barriers to promoting physical activity through novel clinical applications of existing PA sensor technology integrated with web-based applications.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/621722-
dc.description.abstract<p><strong><strong>Purpose: </strong></strong><span>The objectives of this presentation are to: 1) Describe the participatory approach used to involve bedside nurses, and other disciplines in the conduct of nurse-led research to overcome insufficient older adult mobilization. 2) Discuss how this participatory approach served as a spring-board to build capacity for additional nurse-led research at the bedside.</span></p> <p><strong>Background: </strong>It is well-known that hospitalized older adults do not receive the mobility they need (Barber et al., 2015; Fisher, Graham, Ottenbacher, Deer, & Ostir, 2016). Due to musculoskeletal changes that accompany aging, this population is at increased risk for accelerated muscle loss and weakness which contributes to functional decline, and other adverse health outcomes (Cruz-Jentoft et al., 2010). Studies conducted in a variety of developed countries, including Australia, Canada, England, Ireland, Israel and the United States, show that concerns about the insufficient promotion of mobility in hospitalized older adults exist on an international scale. The urgency to address the mobility needs of older adults is heightened by the demographic shift that is occurring due to our aging population. A recent international research study reported that the growth of older adults 65 years and older is accelerating in multiple developed as well as developing nations (He, Goodkind, & Kowal, 2016).</p> <p>Busy inpatient units have been described as chaotic settings (Catchpole, 2013). In addition, within this environment, nurses encounter a variety of barriers to promoting mobility in older adults (Hoyer, Brotman, Chan, & Needham, 2015). The literature suggests that there is a convergence of knowledge, attitude and external barriers that contributes to the vexing problem of insufficient mobility (Hoyer et al., 2015). While the incongruence between mobility needed and the mobility promoted in hospitalized older adults has been studied for decades—and literature has pointed a critical finger at nurses for failing to promote mobility—little is known about whether the barriers that nurses encounter could explain nurses’ mobility-promoting behavior. The accelerated rise in the number of older adults necessitates that clinical and academic nurses work collaboratively to take the lead to overcome potential barriers to nurse-promoted mobility for this vulnerable population by becoming involved in the design and conduct clinical research.</p> <p>Two key principles to participatory research are to engage partners in all phases of research and to build on existing goals of the clinical setting (Schmittdiel, Brumbach & Selby, 2010). The initial project stemmed from a staff identified need, which was substantiated by the Nurse Manager as a priority and then the study was designed and conducted by the nurse researcher with the participation of bedside nurses. Subsequent projects were based on findings from the initial study and designed collaboratively with the staff and the nurse researcher.</p> <p><strong>Methods: </strong>A participatory approach was used to engage nursing staff in the research process. A team of hospital nurses were involved in discussions addressing all phases of research including data collection methods. To recruit nurse participants for the initial study, informational group discussion sessions were conducted which served to foster an awareness and enthusiasm among the nursing staff. Several additional strategies were employed to nurture and sustain engagement of the nursing staff (Roll et al, 2013). Regular communications were maintained with the nursing staff through informal (i.e., being present on the unit) and formal methods (i.e., unit-based newsletter or email, unit-based council meetings). Study procedures were integrated into daily patient care such as using the informational patient “white board” for communicating mobility goal setting. Nursing staff co-investigators were encouraged and supported to submit abstracts at local, regional and national professional meetings to disseminate findings.</p> <p><strong>Results: </strong>Numerous research-based activities have been generated stemming from the original study purpose to identify and then minimize barriers, and increase nurse-led patient mobilization. Between June 2015 and December of 2016 three research projects were conducted, and two other studies are currently in progress. In addition, 3 manuscripts are under review. Furthermore, findings have been disseminated though posters and podium presentations in a variety of venues including hospital-based symposia, national research conferences and professional nursing organizations. Contributing authors of these research activities are interdisciplinary and include bedside nurses, nurse mangers, physical therapists, volunteers, nurse-researchers, and data analysts. Using a participatory approach is useful to build capacity for nurses and other disciplines to collaboratively address clinical issues and to facilitate nurse-led research at the bedside. In addition, using this approach has stimulated an ongoing dialogue about research findings and has fostered a curiosity about next steps. This has served as a springboard for future nurse-led research to overcome insufficient older adult mobilization.</p> <p><strong>Conclusion: </strong>A participatory approach to clinical research capitalizes on the strengths and knowledge of the bedside nurse and the researcher to design and conduct clinically relevant research. This partnership fosters a culture of curiosity and serves as a springboard to generate additional researchable clinical questions. In addition, this approach provides numerous opportunities for the nursing staff to develop their presentation skills.</p>en
dc.subjectEngaging bedside nurses in nurse-led researchen
dc.subjectPromotion of mobility in hospitalized older adultsen
dc.subjectUsing a participatory interdisciplinary approach to conduct nurse-led researchen
dc.date.available2017-07-07T20:32:02Z-
dc.date.issued2017-07-07-
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-07T20:32:02Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.name28th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.conference.locationDublin, Irelanden
dc.descriptionEvent Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarshipen
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