2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/621731
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
Exploring Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene Practices in Gatineau, Haiti
Other Titles:
Public Health Promotion
Author(s):
Baptiste, Diana Lyn; Pfaff, Teresa A.; Delva, Sabianca; McCormick, Casey; Dallman, Evi; Francois, Ruthly
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Nu Beta
Author Details:
Diana Lyn Baptiste, DNP, MSN, RN, Professional Experience: 2015-Present -- Assistant Professor, Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing, Baltimore, MD 2015-Present - Evidence-based Practice Nurse, Emergency Medicine Department- Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD 2013-Present -- Faculty Associate, Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing, Baltimore, MD 2007-2013 -- Supplemental Staff Nurse--Greater Baltimore Medical Center, Towson, MD 2010-2011 -- Clinical Instructor--Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing, Baltimore, MD 2006-2009 - Supplemental Staff Nurse--Franklin Square Hospital, Baltimore, MD 2000-2006- Staff Nurse- Mercy Medical Center, Baltimore, MD Volunteers on Medical Missions in Haiti Has published and presented internationally Sigma Theta Tau International Society of Nursing, Nu Beta Chapter, President Author Summary: Dr. Baptiste has had a 15-year nursing career devoted to caring for adults, specializing in cardiovascular prevention and health care. She has recently joined the Johns Hopkins Hospital Emergency Medicine Leadership Team, assisting nurse leaders working on various quality improvement projects. Dr. Baptiste has published in areas of heart failure and cultural humility. She has presented nationally and internationally in areas of nursing education with a promoting nurse competencies in acute-care clinical settings.
Abstract:

Purpose:

Haiti is the poorest country in the Western Hemisphere. Located in the Western Caribbean, Haiti is populated by more than 10 million people, sharing the island of Hispaniola with the Dominican Republic. More than 75% of Haitian residents are living on less than two dollars a day and almost 56% on less than one dollar a day. Haitians have limited access to resources such as health care, food, and clean water. The country lacks adequate infrastructure and is highly dependent on non-governmental organizations (NGOs) for public health, schools, and roads. Every year, Haitians die from diseases associated with inadequate water supply, especially with the high prevalence of cholera with mortality rates ranging from 19.1 to 39.4/1,000 person-years between 2010-2011 from the cholera epidemic.

The Gatineau villages in Haiti are composed of several communities in the southwestern mountanous region, where access to basic resources such as food, durable shelter and clean drinking water remains scarce. With only 69% of the population having access to an improved water source, Haiti is the most underserved country in the western hemisphere in terms of water and sanitation infrastructure. The purpose of this presentation is to describe the current state of water sanitation and hygiene (WaSH) in communities surrounding Gatineau, to identify gaps in knowledge for researchers, and to inform feasible interventions to improve water sanitation for residents these areas.

 

Methods:

Our multidisciplinary team, consisting of faculty and students from a school of nursing, public health, and a water institute, have been working collaboratively with a local NGO and community members to address two critical components to community health: sustainable sanitation and water resources. Our team has initiated a three-pronged approach to review the literature surrounding hand washing treatment, hygiene and sanitation. We have conducted data collection through community assessments to better understand some of the barriers and opportunities for sustainable WaSH projects to improve health. All of these initiatives are expanding on the work that the local NGO has been conducting with their Sanitation Community Development Project. Currently the NGO that serves the Gatineau villages has a community promoter program in operation. In this program, two members from each community receives training and reinforcement in basic WaSH practices based on the Center for Affordable Water and Sanitation Technology (CAWST) education materials. All community promoters reside within the communities they serve. The promoter program employs the “train-the-trainer”model for community education. Promoters attend classes at the NGO headquaters where they receive instruction on the 32-page booklet, wirtten in 5th grade level written in their native language of Haitian Kreyol.

Results:

 After visiting seven water sources in the Gatineau villages, we discovered that small streams were the only type of water sources supplying the villages. One stream would serve as the main water source for up to five communities. Water came from various sources, most of which were not clean. Most started at the side or opening of the river and few rivers were full enough to create a current. . There seemed to be three designated functional sections for the water sources. At the top of the stream, women and children collected water with jugs and buckets. Some were washing their feet, bathing and laundering in the inferior section. Cattlemen would allow their livestock to urinate and defecate from the same water source even though they are fenced off to prevent eutrophication and pollution.

 

Conclusion:

We found that water sources in this area are scarce. Community members, usually women and children, commute anywhere from 15 minutes to one hour from their home to retrieve water multiple times a day and transport jugs and heavy containers on their heads. Research has shown that domestic water carrying is associated with detrimental health effects. During the assessment, we rapidly discovered a connection between poor water access and WaSH practices in Gatineau including: common (and uncommon) water treatment methods, and sanitation and hygiene beliefs and practices among Haitians living in these rural villages. Further research is necessary to improve water quality, sanitation, and health in low-resource countries like Haiti.

Keywords:
hygiene; sanitation; water
Repository Posting Date:
10-Jul-2017
Date of Publication:
10-Jul-2017
Other Identifiers:
INRC17P14
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
28th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Dublin, Ireland
Description:
Event Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarship

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.titleExploring Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene Practices in Gatineau, Haitien_US
dc.title.alternativePublic Health Promotionen
dc.contributor.authorBaptiste, Diana Lynen
dc.contributor.authorPfaff, Teresa A.en
dc.contributor.authorDelva, Sabiancaen
dc.contributor.authorMcCormick, Caseyen
dc.contributor.authorDallman, Evien
dc.contributor.authorFrancois, Ruthlyen
dc.contributor.departmentNu Betaen
dc.author.detailsDiana Lyn Baptiste, DNP, MSN, RN, Professional Experience: 2015-Present -- Assistant Professor, Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing, Baltimore, MD 2015-Present - Evidence-based Practice Nurse, Emergency Medicine Department- Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD 2013-Present -- Faculty Associate, Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing, Baltimore, MD 2007-2013 -- Supplemental Staff Nurse--Greater Baltimore Medical Center, Towson, MD 2010-2011 -- Clinical Instructor--Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing, Baltimore, MD 2006-2009 - Supplemental Staff Nurse--Franklin Square Hospital, Baltimore, MD 2000-2006- Staff Nurse- Mercy Medical Center, Baltimore, MD Volunteers on Medical Missions in Haiti Has published and presented internationally Sigma Theta Tau International Society of Nursing, Nu Beta Chapter, President Author Summary: Dr. Baptiste has had a 15-year nursing career devoted to caring for adults, specializing in cardiovascular prevention and health care. She has recently joined the Johns Hopkins Hospital Emergency Medicine Leadership Team, assisting nurse leaders working on various quality improvement projects. Dr. Baptiste has published in areas of heart failure and cultural humility. She has presented nationally and internationally in areas of nursing education with a promoting nurse competencies in acute-care clinical settings.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/621731-
dc.description.abstract<p><strong><span><strong>Purpose:</strong></span></strong></p> <p>Haiti is the poorest country in the Western Hemisphere. Located in the Western Caribbean, Haiti is populated by more than 10 million people, sharing the island of Hispaniola with the Dominican Republic. More than 75% of Haitian residents are living on less than two dollars a day and almost 56% on less than one dollar a day. Haitians have limited access to resources such as health care, food, and clean water. The country lacks adequate infrastructure and is highly dependent on non-governmental organizations (NGOs) for public health, schools, and roads. Every year, Haitians die from diseases associated with inadequate water supply, especially with the high prevalence of cholera with mortality rates ranging from 19.1 to 39.4/1,000 person-years between 2010-2011 from the cholera epidemic.</p> <p>The Gatineau villages in Haiti are composed of several communities in the southwestern mountanous region, where access to basic resources such as food, durable shelter and clean drinking water remains scarce. With only 69% of the population having access to an improved water source, Haiti is the most underserved country in the western hemisphere in terms of water and sanitation infrastructure. The purpose of this presentation is to describe the current state of water sanitation and hygiene (WaSH) in communities surrounding Gatineau, to identify gaps in knowledge for researchers, and to inform feasible interventions to improve water sanitation for residents these areas.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Methods:</strong></p> <p>Our multidisciplinary team, consisting of faculty and students from a school of nursing, public health, and a water institute, have been working collaboratively with a local NGO and community members to address two critical components to community health:<span> sustainable sanitation and water resources. Our team has initiated a three-pronged approach to review the literature surrounding hand washing treatment, hygiene and sanitation. We have conducted data collection through community assessments to better understand some of the barriers and opportunities for sustainable WaSH projects to improve health. All of these initiatives are expanding on the work that the local NGO has been conducting with their Sanitation Community Development Project.</span> Currently the NGO that serves the Gatineau villages has a community promoter program in operation. In this program, two members from each community receives training and reinforcement in basic WaSH practices based on the Center for Affordable Water and Sanitation Technology (CAWST) education materials. All community promoters reside within the communities they serve. The promoter program employs the “train-the-trainer”model for community education. Promoters attend classes at the NGO headquaters where they receive instruction on the 32-page booklet, wirtten in 5<sup>th</sup> grade level written in their native language of Haitian Kreyol.</p> <p><strong>Results:</strong></p> <p> After visiting seven water sources in the Gatineau villages, we discovered that small streams were the only type of water sources supplying the villages. One stream would serve as the main water source for up to five communities. Water came from various sources, most of which were not clean. Most started at the side or opening of the river and few rivers were full enough to create a current. . There seemed to be three designated functional sections for the water sources. At the top of the stream, women and children collected water with jugs and buckets. Some were washing their feet, bathing and laundering in the inferior section. Cattlemen would allow their livestock to urinate and defecate from the same water source even though they are fenced off to prevent eutrophication and pollution.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Conclusion:</strong></p> <p>We found that water sources in this area are scarce. Community members, usually women and children, commute anywhere from 15 minutes to one hour from their home to retrieve water multiple times a day and transport jugs and heavy containers on their heads. Research has shown that domestic water carrying is associated with detrimental health effects. During the assessment, we rapidly discovered a connection between poor water access and WaSH practices in Gatineau including: common (and uncommon) water treatment methods, and sanitation and hygiene beliefs and practices among Haitians living in these rural villages. Further research is necessary to improve water quality, sanitation, and health in low-resource countries like Haiti.</p>en
dc.subjecthygieneen
dc.subjectsanitationen
dc.subjectwateren
dc.date.available2017-07-10T13:30:19Z-
dc.date.issued2017-07-10-
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-10T13:30:19Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.name28th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.conference.locationDublin, Irelanden
dc.descriptionEvent Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarshipen
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.