Transforming Research to a Global Application for Assessment of Women and Children Exposed to Violence

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/621738
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
Transforming Research to a Global Application for Assessment of Women and Children Exposed to Violence
Other Titles:
Strategies to Assist Patients Exposed to Violence
Author(s):
McFarlane, Judith M.; Liu, Fuqin; Fredland, Nina; Koci, Anne; Symes, Lene
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Beta Beta (Houston)
Author Details:
Judith M. McFarlane, DrPH, RN, FAAN, Professional Experience: Dr. McFarlane has more than 30 years of research and teaching experience in issues of gender based violence, including the direction of major research efforts toward testing interventions to decrease violence and better inform policy. Her research findings have been published in peer reviewed journals, presented to congressional committees in the US and used to set standards of care for women worldwide Author Summary: Dr. McFarlane conducts research on the health effects of violence against women and children and the effectiveness of interventions to prevent further violence. Her research has been funded by major government agencies and international foundations. Her research findings have been presented to congressional committees in the US, cited on CNN, and used globally to set standards of care for women and children. Dr. McFarlane has more than 250 peer reviewed publications.
Abstract:

Among women in the United States (U.S.) and worldwide, an estimated 30% have experienced intimate partner violence (WHO 2013). Consequences of violence include acute trauma, poor physical health, and compromised functioning (Ellsberg, Jansen, Heise, Watts Garcia-Moreno, 2008) and is most commonly associated with mental health problems of depression and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) (Symes, McFarlane, Nava, Gilroy, Maddoux, 2013). Recent research indicates the pass through of poor mental health of the mother to behavioral problems of the children (McFarlane, Symes, Binder, Maddoux, Paulson, 2014). To better understand the risk predictors of sustained poor mental health, specifically PTSD, for women reporting intimate partner violence, a multi-year study is underway in Houston, Texas, USA.

Methods of the study include recruitment of 300 mothers reporting intimate partner violence to justice or shelter services for the first time. The women are followed for 7-years to determine the temporal sequencing of how violence impacts women’s mental health and the impact on poor maternal mental health, specifically PTSD, on her children’s functioning. To learn the determinants that mitigate or intensify the impact of violence on mental health, specifically PTSD, measures of mental health are completed every 4-months using validated tools. (One child of each mother is being followed and the child’s behavioral functioning and school performance is measured every four months also).

At year 5 of the study, 94% of the mothers and children are retained. A portfolio of 40 peer-reviewed articles are published, including predictor tools to determine mothers at highest risk to sustained mental health problems, especially PTSD. To transform the research to a smart device, such as a phone and tablet, predictor models were derived and validated for sustained maternal PTSD and sustained child dysfunction and the information programmed to a predictor application. The predictor applications are available in English and Spanish, designed for use on a hand-held device, and disseminated through the World Wide Web at no charge. The predictor tools enable first responders and front line providers to quickly assess and triage women and children exposed to domestic violence to needed services.

The predictor applications, termed FAST (First Assessment Screening Tools) Apps, translate 5-years of research into strategies for practitioners worldwide to optimize health of women and children experiencing domestic violence, by taking into account determinants of health measured through nursing research. The presentation will discuss the continued validation of the First Assessment Screening Tools and uptake internationally of the application. Connection of the FAST application to addressing Sustainable Development Goals 2013 (Transforming Our World, 2016) will be discussed. Additionally, the audience will have the opportunity to download the FAST application and comment on usefulness for best practices during the presentation.

Keywords:
Evidence Based Practice; First Assessment Screening Tools; Predictor Tools
Repository Posting Date:
10-Jul-2017
Date of Publication:
10-Jul-2017
Other Identifiers:
INRC17B01
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
28th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Dublin, Ireland
Description:
Event Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarship

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.titleTransforming Research to a Global Application for Assessment of Women and Children Exposed to Violenceen_US
dc.title.alternativeStrategies to Assist Patients Exposed to Violenceen
dc.contributor.authorMcFarlane, Judith M.en
dc.contributor.authorLiu, Fuqinen
dc.contributor.authorFredland, Ninaen
dc.contributor.authorKoci, Anneen
dc.contributor.authorSymes, Leneen
dc.contributor.departmentBeta Beta (Houston)en
dc.author.detailsJudith M. McFarlane, DrPH, RN, FAAN, Professional Experience: Dr. McFarlane has more than 30 years of research and teaching experience in issues of gender based violence, including the direction of major research efforts toward testing interventions to decrease violence and better inform policy. Her research findings have been published in peer reviewed journals, presented to congressional committees in the US and used to set standards of care for women worldwide Author Summary: Dr. McFarlane conducts research on the health effects of violence against women and children and the effectiveness of interventions to prevent further violence. Her research has been funded by major government agencies and international foundations. Her research findings have been presented to congressional committees in the US, cited on CNN, and used globally to set standards of care for women and children. Dr. McFarlane has more than 250 peer reviewed publications.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/621738-
dc.description.abstract<p><span>Among women in the United States (U.S.) and worldwide, an estimated 30% have experienced intimate partner violence (WHO 2013). Consequences of violence include acute trauma, poor physical health, and compromised functioning (Ellsberg, Jansen, Heise, Watts Garcia-Moreno, 2008) and is most commonly associated with mental health problems of depression and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) (Symes, McFarlane, Nava, Gilroy, Maddoux, 2013). Recent research indicates the pass through of poor mental health of the mother to behavioral problems of the children (McFarlane, Symes, Binder, Maddoux, Paulson, 2014). To better understand the risk predictors of sustained poor mental health, specifically PTSD, for women reporting intimate partner violence, a multi-year study is underway in Houston, Texas, USA.</span></p> <p>Methods of the study include recruitment of 300 mothers reporting intimate partner violence to justice or shelter services for the first time. The women are followed for 7-years to determine the temporal sequencing of how violence impacts women’s mental health and the impact on poor maternal mental health, specifically PTSD, on her children’s functioning. To learn the determinants that mitigate or intensify the impact of violence on mental health, specifically PTSD, measures of mental health are completed every 4-months using validated tools. (One child of each mother is being followed and the child’s behavioral functioning and school performance is measured every four months also).</p> <p>At year 5 of the study, 94% of the mothers and children are retained. A portfolio of 40 peer-reviewed articles are published, including predictor tools to determine mothers at highest risk to sustained mental health problems, especially PTSD. To transform the research to a smart device, such as a phone and tablet, predictor models were derived and validated for sustained maternal PTSD and sustained child dysfunction and the information programmed to a predictor application. The predictor applications are available in English and Spanish, designed for use on a hand-held device, and disseminated through the World Wide Web at no charge. The predictor tools enable first responders and front line providers to quickly assess and triage women and children exposed to domestic violence to needed services.</p> <p>The predictor applications, termed FAST (First Assessment Screening Tools) Apps, translate 5-years of research into strategies for practitioners worldwide to optimize health of women and children experiencing domestic violence, by taking into account determinants of health measured through nursing research. The presentation will discuss the continued validation of the First Assessment Screening Tools and uptake internationally of the application. Connection of the FAST application to addressing Sustainable Development Goals 2013 (Transforming Our World, 2016) will be discussed. Additionally, the audience will have the opportunity to download the FAST application and comment on usefulness for best practices during the presentation.</p>en
dc.subjectEvidence Based Practiceen
dc.subjectFirst Assessment Screening Toolsen
dc.subjectPredictor Toolsen
dc.date.available2017-07-10T14:35:38Z-
dc.date.issued2017-07-10-
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-10T14:35:38Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.name28th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.conference.locationDublin, Irelanden
dc.descriptionEvent Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarshipen
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