Functioning and Personal Experience Predict Job Satisfaction of Dedicated Nurses Working in Infection Isolation Rooms

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/621747
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Poster
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
Functioning and Personal Experience Predict Job Satisfaction of Dedicated Nurses Working in Infection Isolation Rooms
Author(s):
Melnikov, Semyon; Phridman, Shoshana; Shalom, Esther; Kagan, Ilya
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Phi Gamma
Author Details:
Semyon Melnikov, PhD, RN, Professional Experience: 2012- present -- Lecturer, Nursing Department, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv Israel 2008-2012 -- Research Assistant, Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Ramat Gan, Israel 1997-2005 -- RN, ICCU, Souraski Medical Center, Tel Aviv, Israel Author Summary: The author has a 5 year of experience as a lecturer at the Nursing Department at TA University. Among themes of the author's research is exploring effects of organizational climate and environment, and personal working experience on nurses job satisfaction. The author is one of the co-authors of the scientific papers examining effects of the working and environment on nurses' professional functioning and job satisfaction.
Abstract:

Purpose:

Job satisfaction, as a factor affecting the retention of nurses, is under extensive research and a focus of healthcare systems leadership. The aim of this study was to elucidate the effect of personal practice experience, sense of loneliness, perceived knowledge of KPC, and professional functioning, on job satisfaction among nurses working as dedicated carers of KPC infected patients hospitalized in isolation rooms.

Methods:

In a study with a cross-sectional design, a convenience sample of 87 registered nurses working on medical-surgical wards answered a self-administered questionnaire about (a) job satisfaction, (b) perceived knowledge of KPC infection, (c) personal experience of working in dedicated isolation rooms, (d) sense of loneliness, (e) the respondents' perception of their professional functioning on the wardData were analyzed by descriptive statistics, Pearson correlation coefficients, tests, a one-way ANOVA, and multiple regression analysis.

Results:

Nurses reported a slightly positive experience of working in isolation rooms, average levels of feeling lonely at work, good functioning on the ward, and high levels of perceived knowledge about source infection and job satisfaction. Nurses were more satisfied with their job when their perceived knowledge of infection control was better, their personal experience of working in KPC isolation rooms was more positive, and they perceived their professional functioning as more effective and productive. The higher the nurses' sense of loneliness the poorer their experience of working with a KPC cohort and the poorer their self-reported professional functioning on the ward. Personal experience of working in KPC-source isolation rooms and perceived level of professional functioning on the ward predicted the dependent variable, explaining 33% (R2=.327) of the variance in nurses' job satisfaction.

Conclusion:

The job satisfaction of nurses working as dedicated carers of KPC-infected patients is affected by perceived knowledge of infection control, their personal experience of working in KPC isolation rooms, and perceived professional functioning. The current study emphasizes the importance of nursing management's addressing psychosocial aspects of working as dedicated nurses in the in-ward 'bubble' in hospital settings.

Keywords:
Job Satisfaction; Personal Experience; Professional Functioning
Repository Posting Date:
10-Jul-2017
Date of Publication:
10-Jul-2017
Other Identifiers:
INRC17PST139
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
28th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Dublin, Ireland
Description:
Event Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarship

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePosteren
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.titleFunctioning and Personal Experience Predict Job Satisfaction of Dedicated Nurses Working in Infection Isolation Roomsen_US
dc.contributor.authorMelnikov, Semyonen
dc.contributor.authorPhridman, Shoshanaen
dc.contributor.authorShalom, Estheren
dc.contributor.authorKagan, Ilyaen
dc.contributor.departmentPhi Gammaen
dc.author.detailsSemyon Melnikov, PhD, RN, Professional Experience: 2012- present -- Lecturer, Nursing Department, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv Israel 2008-2012 -- Research Assistant, Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Ramat Gan, Israel 1997-2005 -- RN, ICCU, Souraski Medical Center, Tel Aviv, Israel Author Summary: The author has a 5 year of experience as a lecturer at the Nursing Department at TA University. Among themes of the author's research is exploring effects of organizational climate and environment, and personal working experience on nurses job satisfaction. The author is one of the co-authors of the scientific papers examining effects of the working and environment on nurses' professional functioning and job satisfaction.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/621747-
dc.description.abstract<p><strong>Purpose:</strong></p> <p>Job satisfaction, as a factor affecting the retention of nurses, is under extensive research and a focus of healthcare systems leadership. The aim of this study was to elucidate the effect of personal practice experience, sense of loneliness, perceived knowledge of KPC, and professional functioning, on job satisfaction among nurses working as dedicated carers of KPC infected patients hospitalized in isolation rooms.</p> <p><strong>Methods:</strong></p> <p>In a study with a cross-sectional design, a convenience sample of 87 registered nurses working on medical-surgical wards answered a self-administered questionnaire about (<em>a</em>) job satisfaction, (<em>b</em>) perceived knowledge of KPC infection, (<em>c</em>) personal experience of working in dedicated isolation rooms, (<em>d</em>) sense of loneliness, (<em>e</em>) the respondents' perception of their professional functioning on the ward<strong>. </strong>Data were analyzed by descriptive statistics, Pearson correlation coefficients, <em>t </em>tests, a one-way ANOVA, and multiple regression analysis.</p> <p><strong>Results:</strong></p> <p>Nurses reported a slightly positive experience of working in isolation rooms, average levels of feeling lonely at work, good functioning on the ward, and high levels of perceived knowledge about source infection and job satisfaction. Nurses were more satisfied with their job when their perceived knowledge of infection control was better, their personal experience of working in KPC isolation rooms was more positive, and they perceived their professional functioning as more effective and productive. The higher the nurses' sense of loneliness the poorer their experience of working with a KPC cohort and the poorer their self-reported professional functioning on the ward. Personal experience of working in KPC-source isolation rooms and perceived level of professional functioning on the ward predicted the dependent variable, explaining 33% (R<sup>2</sup>=.327) of the variance in nurses' job satisfaction<span lang="HE" dir="RTL">.</span></p> <p><strong>Conclusion:</strong></p> <p>The job satisfaction of nurses working as dedicated carers of KPC-infected patients is affected by perceived knowledge of infection control, their personal experience of working in KPC isolation rooms, and perceived professional functioning. The current study emphasizes the importance of nursing management's addressing psychosocial aspects of working as dedicated nurses in the in-ward 'bubble' in hospital settings.</p>en
dc.subjectJob Satisfactionen
dc.subjectPersonal Experienceen
dc.subjectProfessional Functioningen
dc.date.available2017-07-10T16:25:42Z-
dc.date.issued2017-07-10-
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-10T16:25:42Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.name28th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.conference.locationDublin, Irelanden
dc.descriptionEvent Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarshipen
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