2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/621763
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Poster
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
Professional Development of Nurse Leaders
Author(s):
Embree, Jennifer L.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Alpha
Author Details:
Jennifer L. Embree, DNP, MSN, BSN, RN, NE-BC, CCNS, Professional Experience: Coordinator of the MSN and DNP Nursing Leadership and Health Systems Program. Nurse Faculty Scholar-Sigma Theta Tau, 2014-2015.Committee member: Research and Scholarship Committee, DNP Curriculum and Student Affairs Committee and DNP Evaluation Committee. Indiana State Nurses Association Immediate Past-President. Centerstone of Indiana Board Immediate Past-President. Have been a faculty member teaching aross the curriculum of RN-BSN, BSN, MSN-Clinical Nurse Specialist, MSN Nursing Leadership in Health Systems and DNP Leadership Programs. IU School of Nursing Clinical Faculty Leadership Mentoring Program 2015-2017. Steering Committee Member-Indiana Action Coalition. Past Executive Board Member Indiana Center for Nursing. Board Member at Large-Indiana League for Nursing. Board Member and Past President-Indiana Organization of Nurse Executives. Author Summary: Jennifer Embree is a former NFLA Scholar and working in partnership with Indiana University School of Nursing and Eskenazi Health System as their Magnet Coordinator.
Abstract:

The purpose of this presentation is to describe curriculum innovation using a strengths-based perspective to develop graduate nurse leader talents and emotional intelligence. Health care reform and the resultant complexity require Registered Nurse (RN) leaders to demonstrate transformational skills (Institute of Medicine [IOM], 2011; Trossman, 2010). Challenges in the health care environment include current and future technologic requirements, escalated pay for performance prerequisites, and retention and recruitment of the nursing workforce (Doody & Doody, 2012). Operating in principal leadership roles, leadership students need professional leadership skills and flexibility in order to facilitate nursing care delivery change in morphing health care organizations. Competencies and expectations that leadership students need to meet future health care challenges include being able to identify personal talents, developing emotional intelligence (EI), and expanding transformational leadership skills. Identifying personal talents and EI is foundational to developing transformational leaders (O’Neill, 2013). Supported in the literature, EI and transformational leadership are essential to enhancing organizational productivity (Weberg, 2010). Preparing graduate leadership students (hereafter referred to as leadership students) to guide nursing transformation is critical to the future of health care and to the 3.6 million nurses in the United States delivering care (ANA, 2016). To provide a foundation for nursing leadership transformational skill development, the Nurse Manager Leadership Partnership’s Learning Domain Framework’s (NMLP) was adopted. The three spheres of the NMLP are: the science: managing the business; the art: leading the people; and the internal leader: creating the internal leader (Lee, Peck, Rutherford, & Shannon, 2008). Specifically related to the nursing leadership course content were: relationship management, influencing behaviors (the internal leader), personal and professional accountability, career planning, and personal journey disciplines (the art sphere) (Lee, Peck, Rutherford, & Shannon, 2008). Faculty developed learning activities allowed students to customize and integrate their abilities into nurse leaders’ personal work roles. Since StrengthsFinder and EI assessments provide participants with their baseline strengths and EI, the results of both assessments provide additional information and opportunities for leadership students’ developmental changes (Rath, 2007; Bradberry & Greaves, 2009). Threading self-assessment content into leadership assignments can assist leadership students’ integration of learning into their clinical leadership practice. All leadership students described learning in relation to their strengths and EI and the importance of these talents to the nursing leadership role.

Keywords:
Emotional Intelligence; Strengths Based Leadership; Transformational
Repository Posting Date:
10-Jul-2017
Date of Publication:
10-Jul-2017
Other Identifiers:
INRC17PST511
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
28th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Dublin, Ireland
Description:
Event Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarship

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePosteren
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.titleProfessional Development of Nurse Leadersen_US
dc.contributor.authorEmbree, Jennifer L.en
dc.contributor.departmentAlphaen
dc.author.detailsJennifer L. Embree, DNP, MSN, BSN, RN, NE-BC, CCNS, Professional Experience: Coordinator of the MSN and DNP Nursing Leadership and Health Systems Program. Nurse Faculty Scholar-Sigma Theta Tau, 2014-2015.Committee member: Research and Scholarship Committee, DNP Curriculum and Student Affairs Committee and DNP Evaluation Committee. Indiana State Nurses Association Immediate Past-President. Centerstone of Indiana Board Immediate Past-President. Have been a faculty member teaching aross the curriculum of RN-BSN, BSN, MSN-Clinical Nurse Specialist, MSN Nursing Leadership in Health Systems and DNP Leadership Programs. IU School of Nursing Clinical Faculty Leadership Mentoring Program 2015-2017. Steering Committee Member-Indiana Action Coalition. Past Executive Board Member Indiana Center for Nursing. Board Member at Large-Indiana League for Nursing. Board Member and Past President-Indiana Organization of Nurse Executives. Author Summary: Jennifer Embree is a former NFLA Scholar and working in partnership with Indiana University School of Nursing and Eskenazi Health System as their Magnet Coordinator.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/621763-
dc.description.abstract<p><span>The purpose of this presentation is to describe curriculum innovation using a strengths-based perspective to develop graduate nurse leader talents and emotional intelligence. Health care reform and the resultant complexity require Registered Nurse (RN) leaders to demonstrate transformational skills (Institute of Medicine [IOM], 2011; Trossman, 2010). Challenges in the health care environment include current and future technologic requirements, escalated pay for performance prerequisites, and retention and recruitment of the nursing workforce (Doody & Doody, 2012). Operating in principal leadership roles, leadership students need professional leadership skills and flexibility in order to facilitate nursing care delivery change in morphing health care organizations. Competencies and expectations that leadership students need to meet future</span><sup> </sup><span>health care challenges include being able to identify personal talents, developing emotional intelligence (EI), and expanding transformational leadership skills. Identifying personal talents and EI is foundational to developing transformational leaders (O’Neill, 2013). Supported in the literature, EI and transformational leadership are essential to enhancing organizational productivity (Weberg, 2010). Preparing graduate leadership students (hereafter referred to as leadership students) to guide nursing transformation is critical to the future of health care and to the 3.6 million nurses in the United States delivering care (ANA, 2016). To provide a foundation for nursing leadership transformational skill development, the Nurse Manager Leadership Partnership’s Learning Domain Framework’s (NMLP) was adopted. The three spheres of the NMLP are: the science: managing the business; the art: leading the people; and the internal leader: creating the internal leader (Lee, Peck, Rutherford, & Shannon, 2008). Specifically related to the nursing leadership course content were: relationship management, influencing behaviors (the internal leader), personal and professional accountability, career planning, and personal journey disciplines (the art sphere) (Lee, Peck, Rutherford, & Shannon, 2008). Faculty developed learning activities allowed students to customize and integrate their abilities into nurse leaders’ personal work roles. Since StrengthsFinder and EI assessments provide participants with their baseline strengths and EI, the results of both assessments provide additional information and opportunities for leadership students’ developmental changes (Rath, 2007; Bradberry & Greaves, 2009). Threading self-assessment content into leadership assignments can assist leadership students’ integration of learning into their clinical leadership practice. All leadership students described learning in relation to their strengths and EI and the importance of these talents to the nursing leadership role.</span></p>en
dc.subjectEmotional Intelligenceen
dc.subjectStrengths Based Leadershipen
dc.subjectTransformationalen
dc.date.available2017-07-10T19:03:59Z-
dc.date.issued2017-07-10-
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-10T19:03:59Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.name28th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.conference.locationDublin, Irelanden
dc.descriptionEvent Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarshipen
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