2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/621765
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Poster
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
The Grieving Mr. Mom: Exploring Life After Maternal Death
Author(s):
Johnston, Donald
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Beta Chi
Author Details:
Donald Johnston, PhD, MHS, RN, RRT, Professional Experience: 2014 - Present Assistant Professor, Nursing Northwestern State University - Shreveport, LA 2013 – 2014 Clinical/Research Specialist Dept. of Education, University Health – Shreveport, LA 2005 – 2013 Staff RN, NICU LSU Health Sciences Center – Shreveport, LA 1998 – 2005 Staff Respiratory Therapist LSU Health Sciences Center – Shreveport, LA Author Summary: Dr. Donald Johnston is dually licensed as a registered respiratory therapist and a registered nurse. In 2013, he received a PhD in Nursing from the University of Texas in Tyler. He is currently an Assistant Professor of Nursing at NSU in Shreveport, and a part-time staff RN in the Medical and Neonatal ICU. He has been involved in direct patient care for over 19 years, while conducting research in both respiratory and nursing fields.
Abstract:

Purpose:  In 2015, over 300,000 women lost their lives due to pregnancy related complications worldwide. That is over 800 women per day. These deaths are a tragic loss for the surviving child and the father, as well as the extended family. What is currently known about the phenomenon of maternal death is primarily in the form of statistical data. While the problem has been analyzed in quantitatively, no qualitative exploration of the phenomenon currently exists in U.S. literature. Findings from this qualitative case study will provide a valuable window into the lifeworld of fathers and guardians, as well as implications for health care practitioners. This study sought to uncover a previously unexplored aspect of maternal death, the stories of children and families left behind. By replacing numbers with stories, we sought to personalize the problem, raise awareness, and identify needs. The study sought to answer the following questions: What happens to the children left behind after maternal death? What is the impact on the surviving family and on the community as a whole?

Methods: The lead researcher conducted a series of in-depth, semi-structured interviews with fathers and family members following maternal deaths. Interview guides were used only to initiate conversation, with probing, clarifying questions growing out of subsequent dialogue as it emerged, in order to elicit as much detail as possible. All interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed using interpretive phenomenological analysis. 

Results:  Using interpretive phenomenological analysis, we explore in depth fathers’ experiences during the weeks and months following the death of the infants’ mothers, including infant hospitalization, legal battles, and the struggle to adjust to life as a widowed father. Common themes were identified among participants, including relentless absenceregretsguardianshipfilling her shoes, and seeking support. This study highlights critical needs for support, as well as how those needs are met, or in some cases left unmet.

Conclusion: It is imperative that health care practitioners treating women during pregnancy make every effort to include fathers throughout the pregnancy, educate fathers as to the mother’s high risk health concerns, and be prepared to provide local sources of support in the event of maternal death. Practitioners should also be aware that support needs continue to be high throughout the infant’s first year of life. Extended family and friends may be involved in the infant’s health care in order to help fill the maternal role.

Keywords:
fathers; Interpretive phenomenology; maternal mortality
Repository Posting Date:
10-Jul-2017
Date of Publication:
10-Jul-2017
Other Identifiers:
INRC17PST392
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
28th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Dublin, Ireland
Description:
Event Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarship

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePosteren
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.titleThe Grieving Mr. Mom: Exploring Life After Maternal Deathen_US
dc.contributor.authorJohnston, Donalden
dc.contributor.departmentBeta Chien
dc.author.detailsDonald Johnston, PhD, MHS, RN, RRT, Professional Experience: 2014 - Present Assistant Professor, Nursing Northwestern State University - Shreveport, LA 2013 – 2014 Clinical/Research Specialist Dept. of Education, University Health – Shreveport, LA 2005 – 2013 Staff RN, NICU LSU Health Sciences Center – Shreveport, LA 1998 – 2005 Staff Respiratory Therapist LSU Health Sciences Center – Shreveport, LA Author Summary: Dr. Donald Johnston is dually licensed as a registered respiratory therapist and a registered nurse. In 2013, he received a PhD in Nursing from the University of Texas in Tyler. He is currently an Assistant Professor of Nursing at NSU in Shreveport, and a part-time staff RN in the Medical and Neonatal ICU. He has been involved in direct patient care for over 19 years, while conducting research in both respiratory and nursing fields.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/621765-
dc.description.abstract<p><strong>Purpose: </strong><span> In 2015, over 300,000 women lost their lives due to pregnancy related complications worldwide. That is over 800 women per day. These deaths are a tragic loss for the surviving child and the father, as well as the extended family. What is currently known about the phenomenon of maternal death is primarily in the form of statistical data. While the problem has been analyzed in quantitatively, no qualitative exploration of the phenomenon currently exists in U.S. literature. Findings from this qualitative case study will provide a valuable window into the lifeworld of fathers and guardians, as well as implications for health care practitioners. </span><span>This study sought to uncover a previously unexplored aspect of maternal death, the stories of children and families left behind. By replacing numbers with stories, we sought to personalize the problem, raise awareness, and identify needs. The study sought to answer the following questions: What happens to the children left behind after maternal death? What is the impact on the surviving family and on the community as a whole?</span></p> <p><strong>Methods: </strong>The lead researcher conducted a series of in-depth, semi-structured interviews with fathers and family members following maternal deaths. Interview guides were used only to initiate conversation, with probing, clarifying questions growing out of subsequent dialogue as it emerged, in order to elicit as much detail as possible. All interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed using interpretive phenomenological analysis. </p> <p><strong>Results: </strong> Using interpretive phenomenological analysis, we explore in depth fathers’ experiences during the weeks and months following the death of the infants’ mothers, including infant hospitalization, legal battles, and the struggle to adjust to life as a widowed father. Common themes were identified among participants, including <em>r</em><em>elentless absence</em>, <em>regrets</em>, <em>guardianship</em>, <em>filling her shoes</em>, and <em>seeking support</em>. This study highlights critical needs for support, as well as how those needs are met, or in some cases left unmet.</p> <p><strong>Conclusion: </strong>It is imperative that health care practitioners treating women during pregnancy make every effort to include fathers throughout the pregnancy, educate fathers as to the mother’s high risk health concerns, and be prepared to provide local sources of support in the event of maternal death. Practitioners should also be aware that support needs continue to be high throughout the infant’s first year of life. Extended family and friends may be involved in the infant’s health care in order to help fill the maternal role.</p>en
dc.subjectfathersen
dc.subjectInterpretive phenomenologyen
dc.subjectmaternal mortalityen
dc.date.available2017-07-10T19:27:08Z-
dc.date.issued2017-07-10-
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-10T19:27:08Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.name28th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.conference.locationDublin, Irelanden
dc.descriptionEvent Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarshipen
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