Regular Sport Activity Is Positively Associated With Biopsychosocial Outcomes in Adults With Congenital Heart Disease

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/621773
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Poster
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
Regular Sport Activity Is Positively Associated With Biopsychosocial Outcomes in Adults With Congenital Heart Disease
Author(s):
Yang, Hsiao-Ling
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Alpha Beta
Author Details:
Hsiao-Ling Yang, PhD, RN, Professional Experience: 2013-present: Assistant Professor, School of Nursing, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University 2004 – 2013: Instructor, School of Nursing, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University 2000 –2004: Teaching Assistant, School of Nursing, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University Jul. 1995 – Aug. 1998, Aug. 2001 –Jul. 2006, Aug. 2008 –present: Registered Nurse, National Taiwan University Hospital. Author Summary: Dr. Yang is an assistant professor of National Taiwan University. Her major is pediatric care. Recently, she is mainly involved in outcome and quality of life research in congenital heart disease.
Abstract:

Purpose:  The purpose of this study was to explore whether adults with congenital heart disease (CHD) engaged in regular sport, and to examine whether participating in sport activities on a regular basis was associated with increase exercise capacity as well as better quality of life in adults with CHD.

Methods:  From March 2014 to July 2014, a total of one hundred and thirty adults (82 female, 48 male, 18 -61 years) with various CHD were included in this study, twenty four (18.5%) with simple CHD, seventy four with moderate CHD (56.9%), and thirty two (24.6%) with great complexity CHD. Participants completed two self-report scales and cardiopulmonary exercise test. Self-report scales including the Health Behavior Scale-Congenital Heart Disease (HBS-CHD) and the Satisfaction with Life Scale (SWLS) were used to assess whether adults with CHD practiced sport activity regularly and to evaluate their quality of life respectively. Cardiopulmonary exercise test was conducted to evaluate patient’s exercise capacity using the UltimaTMCPX. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 16.0 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, Illinois, USA).

Results:  Most adult patients with CHD (n=87, 66.9%) did not participated in sports activities regularly. Age, education level, complexity of the heart defect and comorbidities were not related to patients whether practiced sport regularly (p>0.05). However, female significantly reported less regular sport activities than male (22.0% vs. 51.1%, p=0.01). Both exercise capacity and quality of life of patients who participated sport regularly were better than patients who did not practiced sport regularly (Peak O2 consumption: 24.56 ml/kg/min vs. 20.69 ml/kg/min, p<0.001; METs: 7.00 vs. 5.93, p<0.001; percentage of the predicted: 68.60 value vs. 60.33, p=0.016; SWLS score: 26.19 vs. 23.59, p=0.035).

Conclusion:  Most adults with CHD did not perform regular physical sport, especially female adults with CHD. The results provided evidence that regular physical sport is positively associated with not only physical function, exercise capacity, but also psychosocial domain, quality of life. The future study should examine the causal relationship between regular sport activity and exercise capacity and quality of life in patients with CHD. However, continued efforts are needed in early intervention to promote patient with CHD to do sport regularly.

Keywords:
congenital heart disease; exercise capacity; quality of life
Repository Posting Date:
11-Jul-2017
Date of Publication:
11-Jul-2017
Other Identifiers:
INRC17PST193
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
28th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Dublin, Ireland
Description:
Event Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarship

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePosteren
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.titleRegular Sport Activity Is Positively Associated With Biopsychosocial Outcomes in Adults With Congenital Heart Diseaseen_US
dc.contributor.authorYang, Hsiao-Lingen
dc.contributor.departmentAlpha Betaen
dc.author.detailsHsiao-Ling Yang, PhD, RN, Professional Experience: 2013-present: Assistant Professor, School of Nursing, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University 2004 – 2013: Instructor, School of Nursing, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University 2000 –2004: Teaching Assistant, School of Nursing, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University Jul. 1995 – Aug. 1998, Aug. 2001 –Jul. 2006, Aug. 2008 –present: Registered Nurse, National Taiwan University Hospital. Author Summary: Dr. Yang is an assistant professor of National Taiwan University. Her major is pediatric care. Recently, she is mainly involved in outcome and quality of life research in congenital heart disease.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/621773-
dc.description.abstract<p><strong>Purpose: </strong><span> The purpose of this study was to explore whether adults with congenital heart disease (CHD) engaged in regular sport, and to examine whether participating in sport activities on a regular basis was associated with increase exercise capacity as well as better quality of life in adults with CHD.</span></p> <p><strong>Methods: </strong> From March 2014 to July 2014, a total of one hundred and thirty adults (82 female, 48 male, 18 -61 years) with various CHD were included in this study, twenty four (18.5%) with simple CHD, seventy four with moderate CHD (56.9%), and thirty two (24.6%) with great complexity CHD. Participants completed two self-report scales and cardiopulmonary exercise test. Self-report scales including the Health Behavior Scale-Congenital Heart Disease (HBS-CHD) and the Satisfaction with Life Scale (SWLS) were used to assess whether adults with CHD practiced sport activity regularly and to evaluate their quality of life respectively. Cardiopulmonary exercise test was conducted to evaluate patient’s exercise capacity using the Ultima<sup>TM</sup>CPX. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 16.0 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, Illinois, USA).</p> <p><strong>Results: </strong> Most adult patients with CHD (n=87, 66.9%) did not participated in sports activities regularly. Age, education level, complexity of the heart defect and comorbidities were not related to patients whether practiced sport regularly (p>0.05). However, female significantly reported less regular sport activities than male (22.0% vs. 51.1%, p=0.01). Both exercise capacity and quality of life of patients who participated sport regularly were better than patients who did not practiced sport regularly (Peak O2 consumption: 24.56 ml/kg/min vs. 20.69 ml/kg/min, p<0.001; METs: 7.00 vs. 5.93, p<0.001; percentage of the predicted: 68.60 value vs. 60.33, p=0.016; SWLS score: 26.19 vs. 23.59, p=0.035).</p> <p><strong>Conclusion: </strong> Most adults with CHD did not perform regular physical sport, especially female adults with CHD. The results provided evidence that regular physical sport is positively associated with not only physical function, exercise capacity, but also psychosocial domain, quality of life. The future study should examine the causal relationship between regular sport activity and exercise capacity and quality of life in patients with CHD. However, continued efforts are needed in early intervention to promote patient with CHD to do sport regularly.</p>en
dc.subjectcongenital heart diseaseen
dc.subjectexercise capacityen
dc.subjectquality of lifeen
dc.date.available2017-07-11T14:22:41Z-
dc.date.issued2017-07-11-
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-11T14:22:41Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.name28th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.conference.locationDublin, Irelanden
dc.descriptionEvent Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarshipen
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