2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/621774
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Poster
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
The Effects of Tai Chi Exercise on Cardiovascular Functions: A Meta-Analysis
Author(s):
Shih, Hsiao-Ping; Fang, Yueh-Yen
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Hsiao-Ping Shih, MSN, RN, Professional Experience: After 17 years working as an RN, I was promoted to the head nurse position and manage the outpatient department of a 300-bed acute care hospital. This is my 8th year at this position. I have nursing experiences from multiple areas, including ICU, CCU, multiple Med-Surge unit, and SARS. Author Summary: After 17 years working as an RN, I was promoted to the head nurse position and manage the outpatient departmentof a 300-bed acute care hospital. This is my 8th year at this position. I have nursing experiences from multiple areas, including ICU, CCU, multiple Med-Surge unit, and SARS.
Abstract:

Purpose:

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), the prevalence of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) continues to rise, and will be accounted for 23.6 million global deaths by 2030. Physical activity plays an important role on cardiac rehabilitation. Prior studies had suggested that exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation had contributed to a reduction of 20% mortality in patients with coronary artery disease. Tai Chi, a traditional Chinese conditioning exercise, is well recognized by its effect on relaxation. Many studies had investigated its effect on cardiovascular functions, however, there was a lack of direct measure on heart functions and the study results were inconsistent across studies. To validate the effect of Tai Chi on cardiovascular functions, we reviewed current literature related to Tai Chi and its effect on direct measures of cardiac functions.

Methods:

We searched two Chinese databases (CEPS, and the Chinese Thesis/Dissertation database) and four English databases (CINAHL, Medline, PubMed, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials). The search was up to August, 2016. Only studies that investigated the effect of Tai Chi on stroke volume and cardiac output were included. Evaluations of study quality were conducted by the 2011 Oxford Centre for Evidence Based Medicine Levels of Evidence, and the Cochrane Collaboration’s tool for assessing risk of bias. Meta-analyses were performed by the random effect model.

Results:

719 citations were reviewed. Most related studies only measured heart rate and blood pressure, only 4 studies measured stroke volume and cardiac output. These studies all encountered high risk of bias in allocation concealment, blinding of participants and personnel, and blinding of outcome assessment. The results of meta-analyses showed Tai Chi did not bring positive effect to systolic and diastolic blood pressure, heart rate, stroke Volume, and cardiac output.

Conclusion:

Unlike other reviews, this study evaluate cardiac output and stroke volume to measure cardiac function more accurately. Findings of this study did not support Tai Chi as an effective method for improving cardiac functions. This result might indicate higher quality study to be conducted in the future.

Keywords:
Cardiovascular Function; Meta-analysis; Tai Chi
Repository Posting Date:
11-Jul-2017
Date of Publication:
11-Jul-2017
Other Identifiers:
INRC17PST437
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
28th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Dublin, Ireland
Description:
Event Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarship

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePosteren
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.titleThe Effects of Tai Chi Exercise on Cardiovascular Functions: A Meta-Analysisen_US
dc.contributor.authorShih, Hsiao-Pingen
dc.contributor.authorFang, Yueh-Yenen
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen
dc.author.detailsHsiao-Ping Shih, MSN, RN, Professional Experience: After 17 years working as an RN, I was promoted to the head nurse position and manage the outpatient department of a 300-bed acute care hospital. This is my 8th year at this position. I have nursing experiences from multiple areas, including ICU, CCU, multiple Med-Surge unit, and SARS. Author Summary: After 17 years working as an RN, I was promoted to the head nurse position and manage the outpatient departmentof a 300-bed acute care hospital. This is my 8th year at this position. I have nursing experiences from multiple areas, including ICU, CCU, multiple Med-Surge unit, and SARS.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/621774-
dc.description.abstract<p><strong><strong>Purpose:</strong></strong></p> <p>According to the World Health Organization (WHO), the prevalence of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) continues to rise, and will be accounted for 23.6 million global deaths by 2030. Physical activity plays an important role on cardiac rehabilitation. Prior studies had suggested that exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation had contributed to a reduction of 20% mortality in patients with coronary artery disease. Tai Chi, a traditional Chinese conditioning exercise, is well recognized by its effect on relaxation. Many studies had investigated its effect on cardiovascular functions, however, there was a lack of direct measure on heart functions and the study results were inconsistent across studies. To validate the effect of Tai Chi on cardiovascular functions, we reviewed current literature related to Tai Chi and its effect on direct measures of cardiac functions.</p> <p><strong>Methods:</strong></p> <p>We searched two Chinese databases (CEPS, and the Chinese Thesis/Dissertation database) and four English databases (CINAHL, Medline, PubMed, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials). The search was up to August, 2016. Only studies that investigated the effect of Tai Chi on stroke volume and cardiac output were included. Evaluations of study quality were conducted by the 2011 Oxford Centre for Evidence Based Medicine Levels of Evidence, and the Cochrane Collaboration’s tool for assessing risk of bias. Meta-analyses were performed by the random effect model.</p> <p><strong>Results:</strong></p> <p>719 citations were reviewed. Most related studies only measured heart rate and blood pressure, only 4 studies measured stroke volume and cardiac output. These studies all encountered high risk of bias in allocation concealment, blinding of participants and personnel, and blinding of outcome assessment. The results of meta-analyses showed Tai Chi did not bring positive effect to systolic and diastolic blood pressure, heart rate, stroke Volume, and cardiac output.</p> <p><strong>Conclusion:</strong></p> <p>Unlike other reviews, this study evaluate cardiac output and stroke volume to measure cardiac function more accurately. Findings of this study did not support Tai Chi as an effective method for improving cardiac functions. This result might indicate higher quality study to be conducted in the future.</p>en
dc.subjectCardiovascular Functionen
dc.subjectMeta-analysisen
dc.subjectTai Chien
dc.date.available2017-07-11T14:29:54Z-
dc.date.issued2017-07-11-
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-11T14:29:54Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.name28th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.conference.locationDublin, Irelanden
dc.descriptionEvent Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarshipen
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