2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/621783
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Poster
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
Preschool Children: What They Know About Asthma and How They Learn
Author(s):
Troyer, Adaya A.; Wyatt, Tami
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Gamma Chi
Author Details:
Adaya A. Troyer, BSN, RN, Professional Experience: I have completed a four year nursing degree at the University of Tennessee. I graduated with nursing honors. I also have a minor in Child and Family Studies. Author Summary: Adaya Troyer graduated with her BSN and a minor in Child and Family Studies from the University of Tennessee in 2017. She plans to pursue her Nurse Practitioner's License and her doctorate in the coming years.
Abstract:

Purpose: Childhood asthma is a growing societal problem that causes suffering for children and families. Asthma currently impacts 6.8 million children in the United States, with as many as 50-80% developing symptoms before the age of five ( Beydon et al., 2007; National Heart, Lung, and Blood Insitute, 2007). Short of finding a cure, the best way to address this health concern is to give children with asthma the resources they need to control their condition. Unfortunately, research and resources for young children with asthma are lacking. The authors hypothesize using age-appropriate education via technology, which promotes self-regulation with psychosocial elements, could decrease exacerbations and establish healthy habits.

Methods: This qualitative, descriptive study uses in-depth semi-structured interviews and direct participant observation to explore preliterate children’s (3-5 years) understanding of asthma causes, symptoms, and treatments and educational strategies for this age group. Preliterate children who meet at least 3 out of 4 of the National Asthma Education and Prevention Program (NAEPP) criteria are interviewed to determine cognitive development and understanding of asthma and are then allowed a free-play period to help determine the children’s preferences for entertainment and educational tools.

Results: A systematic evaluation of texts (e.g., field notes, transcripts) will provide qualitative data to categorize and identify themes. Additional analysis will determine what elements of the entertainment tools are most attractive to children in this age group by evaluating time spent with the toys and children’s physical and verbal responses during the play period.

Conclusion: Research suggests that children can begin learning to regulate their health behaviors within the first few years of life and that early self-regulation leads to better health and socio-emotional outcomes later in life; therefore, educating preliterate children on how to self-manage their asthma is a key step to decreasing asthma exacerbations and healthcare costs (Archibald et al., 2015; Bandura, 2005; Fraley et al., 2013; Lieberman, 2001; National Heart, Lung, and Blood Insitute, 2007; Yang et al., 2010). Early management of asthma also has the potential to minimize stigma placed on the child due to their chronic disease, thus decreasing feelings of social isolation (Stewart et al., 2011). The ability to use a unique and effective education tool for this aggregate of children would be a significant benefit for the child experiencing asthma and for the healthcare professionals providing care. These data are the foundation to develop future educational materials that enhance cognitive understanding and health-related behavioral regulation in preliterate children diagnosed with asthma.

Keywords:
Asthma; Learning; Preliterate Children
Repository Posting Date:
12-Jul-2017
Date of Publication:
12-Jul-2017
Other Identifiers:
INRC17PST179
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
28th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Dublin, Ireland
Description:
Event Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarship

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePosteren
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.titlePreschool Children: What They Know About Asthma and How They Learnen_US
dc.contributor.authorTroyer, Adaya A.en
dc.contributor.authorWyatt, Tamien
dc.contributor.departmentGamma Chien
dc.author.detailsAdaya A. Troyer, BSN, RN, Professional Experience: I have completed a four year nursing degree at the University of Tennessee. I graduated with nursing honors. I also have a minor in Child and Family Studies. Author Summary: Adaya Troyer graduated with her BSN and a minor in Child and Family Studies from the University of Tennessee in 2017. She plans to pursue her Nurse Practitioner's License and her doctorate in the coming years.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/621783-
dc.description.abstract<p><strong>Purpose: </strong><span>Childhood asthma is a growing societal problem that causes suffering for children and families. Asthma currently impacts 6.8 million children in the United States, with as many as 50-80% developing symptoms before the age of five ( Beydon et al., 2007; National Heart, Lung, and Blood Insitute, 2007). Short of finding a cure, the best way to address this health concern is to give children with asthma the resources they need to control their condition. Unfortunately, research and resources for young children with asthma are lacking. The authors hypothesize using age-appropriate education via technology, which promotes self-regulation with psychosocial elements, could decrease exacerbations and establish healthy habits.</span></p> <p><strong>Methods: </strong>This qualitative, descriptive study uses in-depth semi-structured interviews and direct participant observation to explore preliterate children’s (3-5 years) understanding of asthma causes, symptoms, and treatments and educational strategies for this age group. Preliterate children who meet at least 3 out of 4 of the National Asthma Education and Prevention Program (NAEPP) criteria are interviewed to determine cognitive development and understanding of asthma and are then allowed a free-play period to help determine the children’s preferences for entertainment and educational tools.</p> <p><strong>Results: </strong>A systematic evaluation of texts (e.g., field notes, transcripts) will provide qualitative data to categorize and identify themes. Additional analysis will determine what elements of the entertainment tools are most attractive to children in this age group by evaluating time spent with the toys and children’s physical and verbal responses during the play period.</p> <p><strong>Conclusion: </strong>Research suggests that children can begin learning to regulate their health behaviors within the first few years of life and that early self-regulation leads to better health and socio-emotional outcomes later in life; therefore, educating preliterate children on how to self-manage their asthma is a key step to decreasing asthma exacerbations and healthcare costs (Archibald et al., 2015; Bandura, 2005; Fraley et al., 2013; Lieberman, 2001; National Heart, Lung, and Blood Insitute, 2007; Yang et al., 2010). Early management of asthma also has the potential to minimize stigma placed on the child due to their chronic disease, thus decreasing feelings of social isolation (Stewart et al., 2011). The ability to use a unique and effective education tool for this aggregate of children would be a significant benefit for the child experiencing asthma and for the healthcare professionals providing care. These data are the foundation to develop future educational materials that enhance cognitive understanding and health-related behavioral regulation in preliterate children diagnosed with asthma.</p>en
dc.subjectAsthmaen
dc.subjectLearningen
dc.subjectPreliterate Childrenen
dc.date.available2017-07-12T13:17:49Z-
dc.date.issued2017-07-12-
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-12T13:17:49Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.name28th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.conference.locationDublin, Irelanden
dc.descriptionEvent Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarshipen
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