19.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/621791
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
DNP Capstone Project
Level of Evidence:
Outcomes Research
Research Approach:
Qualitative Research
Title:
Primary Care Practitioners' Guidelines in the Treatment of Chronic Non Cancer Pain
Author(s):
Messer, Alice F.
Additional Author Information:
Alice F. Messer, DNP, FNP-BC
Advisors:
Phelon, Shonda
Degree:
Doctoral – Other
Degree Year:
2017
Grantor:
Mississippi University for Women
Abstract:

Nurse practitioners work in primary care more than any other specialty where they are faced with the difficult task of managing patients who present with chronic non-cancer pain (CNCP).  Opioid medications are commonly prescribed in primary care for chronic pain however, the misuse, abuse and diversion of prescription opioids has led to an international opioid epidemic with more than 15,000 deaths due to unintentional overdose in 2015. (Centers for Disease Control & Prevention, 2016). 

The purpose of this project was to enhance primary care nurse practitioners’ knowledge regarding opioid prescribing evidence-based guidelines in the treatment of CNCP.  By enhancing prescribers’ knowledge of the guidelines, nurse practitioners may help to reduce the prevalence of opioid misuse and decrease the number of deaths due to opioid overdose.

Utilizing Malcolm S. Knowles Adult Learning Theory an educational lecture was created to increase nurse practitioners awareness of the opioid epidemic and provide knowledge regarding the Center for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) recommended opioid prescribing guidelines for chronic pain in primary care.  This two-hour lecture was disseminated at two MNA sponsored pharmacology lectures.  A pre and post- test survey was given to determine nurse practitioners knowledge of the CDC’s opioid guidelines and evaluate the usefulness of the lecture. 

Eighty-eight participants completed both the pre and post surveys questions.  All respondents were nurse practitioners with 67 respondents working in primary care, four in internal medicine, ten in Emergency Room and seven in a specialty clinic or other.  Seventy-nine respondents reported possessing a controlled substance prescriptive authority and of those, all 79 reported they currently prescribe controlled substances.  Nine of the attendees responded they were not registered by the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) to prescribe controlled substances.  On the pre survey knowledge questions 57% of respondents answered more than 50% of the questions incorrectly (7 out of 10).  On the post survey questionnaire 100%, all 88 respondents answered all 12 questions correctly. 

The surveys from the educational lecture revealed improved responses to questions related to recommended guidelines for chronic non cancer pain as evidenced by correct responses on the post lecture questionnaire as compared to the pre survey responses.  Of the nurse practitioners surveyed, only two of the attendants reported having prior knowledge of the CDC guidelines for opioid prescribing leaving 77 of the nurse practitioners who possess controlled substance prescriptive authority reporting no prior knowledge of the recommended CDC guidelines.  Further research is suggested to assess compliance with the guidelines after attending educational lectures.

Keywords:
Opioids; Chronic Pain
CINAHL Headings:
Chronic Pain--Drug Therapy; Chronic Pain; Primary Health Care; Nurse Practitioners; Analgesics, Opioid; Analgesics, Opioid--Therapeutic Use
Description:
Educational lecture improves Primary Care Practitioners' knowledge regarding the Centers for Disease Controls Opioid Guidelines in the Treatment of Chronic Non Cancer Pain
Note:
This work has been approved through a faculty review process prior to its posting in the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository.
Repository Posting Date:
2017-07-12T15:40:06Z
Date of Publication:
2017-07-12

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorPhelon, Shondaen
dc.contributor.authorMesser, Alice F.en
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-12T15:40:06Z-
dc.date.available2017-07-12T15:40:06Z-
dc.date.issued2017-07-12-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/621791-
dc.descriptionEducational lecture improves Primary Care Practitioners' knowledge regarding the Centers for Disease Controls Opioid Guidelines in the Treatment of Chronic Non Cancer Painen
dc.description.abstract<p>Nurse practitioners work in primary care more than any other specialty where they are faced with the difficult task of managing patients who present with chronic non-cancer pain (CNCP).  Opioid medications are commonly prescribed in primary care for chronic pain however, the misuse, abuse and diversion of prescription opioids has led to an international opioid epidemic with more than 15,000 deaths due to unintentional overdose in 2015. (Centers for Disease Control & Prevention, 2016). </p> <p>The purpose of this project was to enhance primary care nurse practitioners’ knowledge regarding opioid prescribing evidence-based guidelines in the treatment of CNCP.  By enhancing prescribers’ knowledge of the guidelines, nurse practitioners may help to reduce the prevalence of opioid misuse and decrease the number of deaths due to opioid overdose.</p> <p>Utilizing Malcolm S. Knowles Adult Learning Theory an educational lecture was created to increase nurse practitioners awareness of the opioid epidemic and provide knowledge regarding the Center for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) recommended opioid prescribing guidelines for chronic pain in primary care.  This two-hour lecture was disseminated at two MNA sponsored pharmacology lectures.  A pre and post- test survey was given to determine nurse practitioners knowledge of the CDC’s opioid guidelines and evaluate the usefulness of the lecture. </p> <p>Eighty-eight participants completed both the pre and post surveys questions.  All respondents were nurse practitioners with 67 respondents working in primary care, four in internal medicine, ten in Emergency Room and seven in a specialty clinic or other.  Seventy-nine respondents reported possessing a controlled substance prescriptive authority and of those, all 79 reported they currently prescribe controlled substances.  Nine of the attendees responded they were not registered by the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) to prescribe controlled substances.  On the pre survey knowledge questions 57% of respondents answered more than 50% of the questions incorrectly (7 out of 10).  On the post survey questionnaire 100%, all 88 respondents answered all 12 questions correctly. </p> <p>The surveys from the educational lecture revealed improved responses to questions related to recommended guidelines for chronic non cancer pain as evidenced by correct responses on the post lecture questionnaire as compared to the pre survey responses.  Of the nurse practitioners surveyed, only two of the attendants reported having prior knowledge of the CDC guidelines for opioid prescribing leaving 77 of the nurse practitioners who possess controlled substance prescriptive authority reporting no prior knowledge of the recommended CDC guidelines.  Further research is suggested to assess compliance with the guidelines after attending educational lectures.</p>en
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.subjectOpioidsen
dc.subjectChronic Painen
dc.titlePrimary Care Practitioners' Guidelines in the Treatment of Chronic Non Cancer Painen_US
dc.typeDNP Capstone Projecten
thesis.degree.grantorMississippi University for Womenen
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral – Otheren
dc.description.noteThis work has been approved through a faculty review process prior to its posting in the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository.-
dc.primary-author.detailsAlice F. Messer, DNP, FNP-BCen
thesis.degree.year2017en
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.evidence.levelOutcomes Researchen
dc.research.approachQualitative Researchen
dc.subject.cinahlChronic Pain--Drug Therapyen
dc.subject.cinahlChronic Painen
dc.subject.cinahlPrimary Health Careen
dc.subject.cinahlNurse Practitionersen
dc.subject.cinahlAnalgesics, Opioiden
dc.subject.cinahlAnalgesics, Opioid--Therapeutic Useen
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