The Lived Experience in Relation to the Educational Needs of Nurses Caring for Induced Hypothermia Patients

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/621805
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Dissertation
Level of Evidence:
Qualitative Study, Phenomenology
Research Approach:
Qualitative Research
Title:
The Lived Experience in Relation to the Educational Needs of Nurses Caring for Induced Hypothermia Patients
Author(s):
Hankinson, Marie
Additional Author Information:
Marie Hankinson, PhD
Advisors:
Dittman, Patricia; Chard, Robin; Rosen, Mary Ellen Mitchell
Degree:
PhD
Degree Year:
2016
Grantor:
Nova Southeastern University
Abstract:

Background: Ongoing educational development is essential to ensure the effectiveness of professional nurses’ learning experiences. Understanding the ways in which workplace learning occurs is fundamental to enabling nurse educators to deliver that knowledge. Induced hypothermia was introduced as a new treatment modality in 2005 and education surrounding the care of the hypothermia patient is lacking in the literature. Purpose: The purpose of this study is to illuminate how nurses learn new knowledge in the clinical setting. Theoretical Framework: The learning theory chosen for this study is the three dimensions of learning by Illeris (2004). Methods: Semistructured interviews were conducted with each participant in one individual, face-to-face session to examine the lived experiences of nurses providing care to induced hypothermia patients. A hermeneutic phenomenology method was chosen based on the work of van Manen. Hycner’s methodological approach was utilized to analyze data. Results: In this study, four learning areas emerged which corresponded to Illeris’ (2003b) three dimensions of learning, including cognitive, emotional, and environmental-social dimensions. The main theme described by every nurse interviewed was the necessity to have hands-on experience to feel competent in their care for induced hypothermia patients. The unit had a special identity because of their unique work of providing hypothermia care and one nurse explained, “We are making history.” Conclusions: Nurses preferred hands-on learning or experiential learning and they helped construct their learning environment. Nurse educators and nurse leaders fueled this synergetic learning process.

Keywords:
workplace learning; Learning styles
CINAHL Headings:
Work Experiences; Education, Clinical; Hypothermia, Induced; Information Needs
Description:
This dissertation has also been disseminated through the ProQuest Dissertations and Theses database. Dissertation/thesis number: 10253494; ProQuest document ID: 1860870000.The author still retains copyright.
Note:
This item has not gone through this repository's peer-review process, but has been accepted by the indicated university or college in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the specified degree.
Repository Posting Date:
2017-07-12T19:33:32Z
Date of Publication:
2017-07-12

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorDittman, Patriciaen
dc.contributor.advisorChard, Robinen
dc.contributor.advisorRosen, Mary Ellen Mitchellen
dc.contributor.authorHankinson, Marieen
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-12T19:33:32Z-
dc.date.available2017-07-12T19:33:32Z-
dc.date.issued2017-07-12-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/621805-
dc.descriptionThis dissertation has also been disseminated through the ProQuest Dissertations and Theses database. Dissertation/thesis number: 10253494; ProQuest document ID: 1860870000.The author still retains copyright.en
dc.description.abstract<p>Background: Ongoing educational development is essential to ensure the effectiveness of professional nurses’ learning experiences. Understanding the ways in which workplace learning occurs is fundamental to enabling nurse educators to deliver that knowledge. Induced hypothermia was introduced as a new treatment modality in 2005 and education surrounding the care of the hypothermia patient is lacking in the literature. Purpose: The purpose of this study is to illuminate how nurses learn new knowledge in the clinical setting. Theoretical Framework: The learning theory chosen for this study is the three dimensions of learning by Illeris (2004). Methods: Semistructured interviews were conducted with each participant in one individual, face-to-face session to examine the lived experiences of nurses providing care to induced hypothermia patients. A hermeneutic phenomenology method was chosen based on the work of van Manen. Hycner’s methodological approach was utilized to analyze data. Results: In this study, four learning areas emerged which corresponded to Illeris’ (2003b) three dimensions of learning, including cognitive, emotional, and environmental-social dimensions. The main theme described by every nurse interviewed was the necessity to have hands-on experience to feel competent in their care for induced hypothermia patients. The unit had a special identity because of their unique work of providing hypothermia care and one nurse explained, “We are making history.” Conclusions: Nurses preferred hands-on learning or experiential learning and they helped construct their learning environment. Nurse educators and nurse leaders fueled this synergetic learning process.</p>en
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.subjectworkplace learningen
dc.subjectLearning stylesen
dc.titleThe Lived Experience in Relation to the Educational Needs of Nurses Caring for Induced Hypothermia Patientsen_US
dc.typeDissertationen
thesis.degree.grantorNova Southeastern Universityen
thesis.degree.levelPhDen
dc.description.noteThis item has not gone through this repository's peer-review process, but has been accepted by the indicated university or college in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the specified degree.en
dc.primary-author.detailsMarie Hankinson, PhDen
thesis.degree.year2016en
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.evidence.levelQualitative Study, Phenomenologyen
dc.research.approachQualitative Researchen
dc.subject.cinahlWork Experiencesen
dc.subject.cinahlEducation, Clinicalen
dc.subject.cinahlHypothermia, Induceden
dc.subject.cinahlInformation Needsen
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