Students' Perceptions of Front-End Loading of Didactic and Simulation Classes in a Maternal Child Course

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/621806
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Poster
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
Students' Perceptions of Front-End Loading of Didactic and Simulation Classes in a Maternal Child Course
Author(s):
Comeaux, Judy; Baker-Townsend, Julie A.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Lambda Rho-at-Large
Author Details:
Judy Comeaux, DNP, ARNP, CRNI, Professional Experience: Dr. Comeaux has trained nurses for over 15 years. She is a practicing pediatric nurse practitioner and she has utilized simulation in her teaching for a number of years. She is responsible for all teaching related to infusion therapy, pediatric and vascular access at the University of North Florida Author Summary: Dr. Judy M. Comeaux is an Assistant Professor at the University of North Florida School of Nursing and the Director of the Regular Prelicensure Program. She is also a practicing pediatric nurse practitioner. She received her BSN from the University of North Florida; both her master's and doctoral degrees are from the University of Florida.She is responsible for all teaching and simulation activities related to pediatrics, infusion therapy and vascular access therapy at UNF.
Abstract:

Purpose:

The purpose of the presentation is to share an innovative approach to teaching undergraduate BSN students’ concepts and practices essential to maternal child nursing prior to inpatient clinical experiences.

Methods:

 

In an effort to improve confidence and ensure acceptable skill level in the maternal child specialty areas, all didactic and simulation experiences were front-end loaded during the first two weeks of the semester. This concept was developed to improve knowledge of maternal child principles to promote safe practices in various inpatient clinical areas of maternal child health. Evidence-based studies have shown the use of laboratory simulators help students become better providers of quality care, increases confidence in the delivery of care, and provides a safe learning environment (Samawi, Miller, & Haras, 2014; Kim, Park, & Shin, 2016).

 

Clinical readiness after simulation activities is essential to success and deeper understanding of nurses processes of the maternal child settings. A six question qualitative survey evaluated students’ perceptions of teaching methods employed by maternal child faculty. Students appreciated the novel teaching technique. They expressed an increase in knowledge and confidence prior to entering the specialty areas. The didactic portion of the class afforded the opportunity to understand the evidence-based concepts prior to simulation experiences. The simulation activities led to increased confidence in students’ abilities to apply safe quality best practices.

Results:

Students appreciated the novel teaching technique. They expressed an increase in knowledge and confidence prior to entering the specialty areas. The didactic portion of the class afforded the opportunity to understand the evidence-based concepts prior to simulation experiences. The simulation activities led to increased confidence in students’ abilities to apply safe quality best practices.

Conclusion:

Teaching undergraduate nursing students maternal child concepts is both challenging and rewarding. Preparing lectures to stimulate students while maintaining their interest in the content is difficult. The students need to be able to apply the knowledge acquired from the classroom and textbooks to inpatient clinical settings. Empowering students to become self-directed learners and promoting the development of critical thinking skills is a key component of teaching. Providing students with the resources to be successful in the classroom while holding them accountable for their own learning leads to academic success (Yang & Jiang, 2014). Utilizing innovative methods of instruction to accommodate the diverse learning skills of individuals’ aids in promoting confidence and success in the clinical setting (Davis, 2013). Students need to be engaged in their learning; they need to actively participate in classroom and simulation experiences (Brannan, White, & Long, 2016; Sin, Sok, Hyun, & Kim, 2015).

Keywords:
Increased student confidence; Innovative teaching strategies; Student Perceptions of teaching methods
Repository Posting Date:
12-Jul-2017
Date of Publication:
12-Jul-2017
Other Identifiers:
INRC17PST578
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
28th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Dublin, Ireland
Description:
Event Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarship

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePosteren
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.titleStudents' Perceptions of Front-End Loading of Didactic and Simulation Classes in a Maternal Child Courseen_US
dc.contributor.authorComeaux, Judyen
dc.contributor.authorBaker-Townsend, Julie A.en
dc.contributor.departmentLambda Rho-at-Largeen
dc.author.detailsJudy Comeaux, DNP, ARNP, CRNI, Professional Experience: Dr. Comeaux has trained nurses for over 15 years. She is a practicing pediatric nurse practitioner and she has utilized simulation in her teaching for a number of years. She is responsible for all teaching related to infusion therapy, pediatric and vascular access at the University of North Florida Author Summary: Dr. Judy M. Comeaux is an Assistant Professor at the University of North Florida School of Nursing and the Director of the Regular Prelicensure Program. She is also a practicing pediatric nurse practitioner. She received her BSN from the University of North Florida; both her master's and doctoral degrees are from the University of Florida.She is responsible for all teaching and simulation activities related to pediatrics, infusion therapy and vascular access therapy at UNF.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/621806-
dc.description.abstract<p><strong>Purpose:</strong></p> <p>The purpose of the presentation is to share an innovative approach to teaching undergraduate BSN students’ concepts and practices essential to maternal child nursing prior to inpatient clinical experiences.</p> <p><strong>Methods:</strong></p> <p> </p> <p>In an effort to improve confidence and ensure acceptable skill level in the maternal child specialty areas, all didactic and simulation experiences were front-end loaded during the first two weeks of the semester. This concept was developed to improve knowledge of maternal child principles to promote safe practices in various inpatient clinical areas of maternal child health. Evidence-based studies have shown the use of laboratory simulators help students become better providers of quality care, increases confidence in the delivery of care, and provides a safe learning environment (Samawi, Miller, & Haras, 2014; Kim, Park, & Shin, 2016).</p> <p> </p> <p>Clinical readiness after simulation activities is essential to success and deeper understanding of nurses processes of the maternal child settings. A six question qualitative survey evaluated students’ perceptions of teaching methods employed by maternal child faculty. Students appreciated the novel teaching technique. They expressed an increase in knowledge and confidence prior to entering the specialty areas. The didactic portion of the class afforded the opportunity to understand the evidence-based concepts prior to simulation experiences. The simulation activities led to increased confidence in students’ abilities to apply safe quality best practices.</p> <p><strong>Results:</strong></p> <p>Students appreciated the novel teaching technique. They expressed an increase in knowledge and confidence prior to entering the specialty areas. The didactic portion of the class afforded the opportunity to understand the evidence-based concepts prior to simulation experiences. The simulation activities led to increased confidence in students’ abilities to apply safe quality best practices.</p> <p><strong>Conclusion:</strong></p> <p>Teaching undergraduate nursing students maternal child concepts is both challenging and rewarding. Preparing lectures to stimulate students while maintaining their interest in the content is difficult. The students need to be able to apply the knowledge acquired from the classroom and textbooks to inpatient clinical settings. Empowering students to become self-directed learners and promoting the development of critical thinking skills is a key component of teaching. Providing students with the resources to be successful in the classroom while holding them accountable for their own learning leads to academic success (Yang & Jiang, 2014). Utilizing innovative methods of instruction to accommodate the diverse learning skills of individuals’ aids in promoting confidence and success in the clinical setting (Davis, 2013). Students need to be engaged in their learning; they need to actively participate in classroom and simulation experiences (Brannan, White, & Long, 2016; Sin, Sok, Hyun, & Kim, 2015).</p>en
dc.subjectIncreased student confidenceen
dc.subjectInnovative teaching strategiesen
dc.subjectStudent Perceptions of teaching methodsen
dc.date.available2017-07-12T20:39:20Z-
dc.date.issued2017-07-12-
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-12T20:39:20Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.name28th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.conference.locationDublin, Irelanden
dc.descriptionEvent Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarshipen
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