2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/621811
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
Human Trafficking: A Call for Inclusion in Nurse Practitioner (NP) Education
Other Titles:
Global Health Equity
Author(s):
Lutz, Rebecca M.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Delta Beta-at-Large
Author Details:
Rebecca M. Lutz, MSN, ARNP, FNP-BC, PPCNP-BC, Professional Experience: 2015 to present - Member of the Health, Education, Advocacy Linkage (HEAL) trafficking educational subcommittee 2015 to present - Doctor of Nursing Practice project focused on human trafficking and education of nurse practitioner students. 2014 to present - Instructor at the University of South Florida Author Summary: Dr. Rebecca Lutz is a native of Tampa, Florida. Licensed as a nurse since 1980, Dr. Lutz received her doctor of nursing practice degree from the University of South Florida with a focus on human trafficking. Currently a visiting instructor at the University of South Florida, College of Nursing, Dr. Lutz enjoys teaching in the baccalaureate and graduate programs. Certified as a family and primary care pediatric practitioner, Dr. Lutz’s expertise is community-based health care.
Abstract:

Purpose:

Human trafficking has increased worldwide. Nurse practitioners practice in a variety of clinical settings and may encounter trafficking victims within their clinical practice. Therefore, it is essential nurse practitioners have the ability to identify and assist trafficking victims. However, human trafficking is not fully integrated into nurse practitioner curriculum. In addition, a lack of evidence exists regarding best practice for curriculum content to increase knowledge of trafficking. This project assessed family and pediatric nurse practitioner knowledge of human trafficking in six primary areas: (1) definitions, (2) laws, (3) prevalence, (4) identification, (5) treatment, and (6) community resources.

Methods:

A one-hour educational intervention focused on each of the six primary areas. The intervention was designed for family and pediatric nurse practitioner students enrolled at a large university. The intervention included a lecture driven by the use of power points, videos, and discussion. Measurement of student knowledge of trafficking was assessed through the use of pre- and post-surveys. Each survey consisted of six Likert-style items measured on a 6-24 point scale. Demographic data collected on all participants included age, gender, years of experience, and previous exposure to trafficking education.

Results:

Student participants (n=73) completed the demographic and pre-survey. Post-survey tool completion fell slightly (n=69). Demographic data revealed participants included more female students (n=64, 87.7%) compared to male students (n=7, 9.6%). A small number of participants did not identify gender preference (n=2, 2.7%). Participants ranged in age between 20 and 59 years of age. Years of nursing experience ranged between 0 and 25 years. Overwhelmingly, most students reported they had never received formalized education on human trafficking (n=69, 94.5%) or education on the treatment of human trafficking victims (n=73, 100%).

Following the intervention, a t-test analysis provided insight into increases in knowledge. All survey questions demonstrated increases in knowledge with t-test outcomes ranging from 11.85 to 20.78 with p < .05. Three survey questions demonstrated the greatest increase in participants’ knowledge: (1) knowledge of laws regarding human trafficking; (2) ability to identifying victims of human trafficking; and (3) knowledge of community and social service resources for victims of human trafficking.

Conclusion:

A gap was identified in family and pediatric nurse practitioner students’ knowledge of human trafficking. An educational intervention increased student’s knowledge of human trafficking. Inclusion of trafficking into nurse practitioner curricula increases the number of providers with knowledge to positively impact health outcomes of the victims.

Keywords:
Health Outcomes; Human Trafficking; Nursing Education
Repository Posting Date:
13-Jul-2017
Date of Publication:
13-Jul-2017
Other Identifiers:
INRC17E07
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
28th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Dublin, Ireland
Description:
Event Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarship

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.titleHuman Trafficking: A Call for Inclusion in Nurse Practitioner (NP) Educationen_US
dc.title.alternativeGlobal Health Equityen
dc.contributor.authorLutz, Rebecca M.en
dc.contributor.departmentDelta Beta-at-Largeen
dc.author.detailsRebecca M. Lutz, MSN, ARNP, FNP-BC, PPCNP-BC, Professional Experience: 2015 to present - Member of the Health, Education, Advocacy Linkage (HEAL) trafficking educational subcommittee 2015 to present - Doctor of Nursing Practice project focused on human trafficking and education of nurse practitioner students. 2014 to present - Instructor at the University of South Florida Author Summary: Dr. Rebecca Lutz is a native of Tampa, Florida. Licensed as a nurse since 1980, Dr. Lutz received her doctor of nursing practice degree from the University of South Florida with a focus on human trafficking. Currently a visiting instructor at the University of South Florida, College of Nursing, Dr. Lutz enjoys teaching in the baccalaureate and graduate programs. Certified as a family and primary care pediatric practitioner, Dr. Lutz’s expertise is community-based health care.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/621811-
dc.description.abstract<p><strong>Purpose:</strong></p> <p>Human trafficking has increased worldwide. Nurse practitioners practice in a variety of clinical settings and may encounter trafficking victims within their clinical practice. Therefore, it is essential nurse practitioners have the ability to identify and assist trafficking victims. However, human trafficking is not fully integrated into nurse practitioner curriculum. In addition, a lack of evidence exists regarding best practice for curriculum content to increase knowledge of trafficking. This project assessed family and pediatric nurse practitioner knowledge of human trafficking in six primary areas: (1) definitions, (2) laws, (3) prevalence, (4) identification, (5) treatment, and (6) community resources.</p> <p><strong>Methods:</strong></p> <p>A one-hour educational intervention focused on each of the six primary areas. The intervention was designed for family and pediatric nurse practitioner students enrolled at a large university. The intervention included a lecture driven by the use of power points, videos, and discussion. Measurement of student knowledge of trafficking was assessed through the use of pre- and post-surveys. Each survey consisted of six Likert-style items measured on a 6-24 point scale. Demographic data collected on all participants included age, gender, years of experience, and previous exposure to trafficking education.</p> <p><strong>Results:</strong></p> <p>Student participants (n=73) completed the demographic and pre-survey. Post-survey tool completion fell slightly (n=69). Demographic data revealed participants included more female students (n=64, 87.7%) compared to male students (n=7, 9.6%). A small number of participants did not identify gender preference (n=2, 2.7%). Participants ranged in age between 20 and 59 years of age. Years of nursing experience ranged between 0 and 25 years. Overwhelmingly, most students reported they had never received formalized education on human trafficking (n=69, 94.5%) or education on the treatment of human trafficking victims (n=73, 100%).</p> <p>Following the intervention, a t-test analysis provided insight into increases in knowledge. All survey questions demonstrated increases in knowledge with <em>t</em>-test outcomes ranging from 11.85 to 20.78 with <em>p</em> < .05. Three survey questions demonstrated the greatest increase in participants’ knowledge: (1) knowledge of laws regarding human trafficking; (2) ability to identifying victims of human trafficking; and (3) knowledge of community and social service resources for victims of human trafficking.</p> <p><strong>Conclusion:</strong></p> <p>A gap was identified in family and pediatric nurse practitioner students’ knowledge of human trafficking. An educational intervention increased student’s knowledge of human trafficking. Inclusion of trafficking into nurse practitioner curricula increases the number of providers with knowledge to positively impact health outcomes of the victims.</p>en
dc.subjectHealth Outcomesen
dc.subjectHuman Traffickingen
dc.subjectNursing Educationen
dc.date.available2017-07-13T13:43:28Z-
dc.date.issued2017-07-13-
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-13T13:43:28Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.name28th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.conference.locationDublin, Irelanden
dc.descriptionEvent Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarshipen
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