2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/621814
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
Test Anxiety Levels in Undergraduate Nursing Students
Other Titles:
Influences on Test Taking in Nursing Education
Author(s):
Rivera, Jamie Beth
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Beta Zeta-at-Large
Author Details:
Jamie Beth Rivera, MSN, RN, CPN, Professional Experience: Certifications • (2007- present) Pediatric Nursing Board Certification (PNBC) • (2005- present) Pediatric Advanced Life Support (PALS) • (2010- present) Emergency Nurse Pediatric Certification (ENPC) • (2010- present) Trauma Nurse Course Certified (TNCC) • (2012- present) BLS Instructor Professional Organizations . 2016 - American Psychiatric Nurses Association • (2010 – present) American Nurses Association (ANA) • (2010 – present) Emergency Nurses Association (ENA) • (2015 – present) Eastern Nursing Research Society (ENRS) Author Summary: Jamie Beth Rivera is a certified pediatric nurse from the United States. She obtained her masters degree in nursing education and has pursued her passion for teaching. She is currently an assistant professor at Westfield State University. Jamie is also a University of Connecticut PhD candidate focusing her research trajectory on child and adolescent mental health. She is honored to be here today presenting her research study focusing on text anxiety in undergraduate nursing education.
Abstract:

BACKGROUND/PURPOSE: For many undergraduate nursing students, performing well in required coursework is important. However, nursing students often face pressure-filled academic situation and worrying about them may inhibit their ability to demonstrate actual knowledge of course material. This can, in turn, interfere with students completing their undergraduate programs or with choosing to pursue advanced nursing degrees following graduation. The purpose of this study was to assess and compare test anxiety levels of sophomore and senior undergraduate nursing students.

METHODS: A convenience sample was utilized for this descriptive survey. A total of 219 nursing students completed a scale that consisted of 26 statements focusing on the cognitive domain of test anxiety. Scores could range from 26 to 104 with higher values indicating greater anxiety. Three cut-points were applied to define low (26-59), moderate (60-69), and high (70-104) anxiety groups.

RESULTS: Internal validity of the instrument was supported by a Cronbach’s alpha of 0.94. The total mean score was M = 67.5 (SD = ± 15.03) and corresponded to a moderate level of anxiety. Mean score comparisons were conducted and showed a sophomore (N = 111) mean anxiety level of 71.2 (SD = ± 14.39) and senior (N = 108) anxiety level of 63.6 ( SD = ± 14.77). The sophomore and senior anxiety levels were significantly different (p <. 001). Mean score comparisons between male (M = 66.04 SD ± 14.24 N=23) and female (M = 67.64 SD ±15.16 N= 193) students revealed no significant difference (p = 0.61). Students who had a GPA below a 3.0 had significantly higher anxiety levels (M = 83.3) than students who reported a GPA above a 3.0 (M = 66.4, p < .001).

CONCLUSION: Overall, nursing students have moderate-to-high test anxiety levels. Sophomore nursing students have higher mean levels than senior students and students who have a GPA below 3.0 have higher levels than those with GPA above 3.0. There was no difference in anxiety between male and female students. Strategies that improve managing test anxiety, such as early assessment, increased awareness, and providing anxiety-reducing interventions for students, may be appropriate additions to undergraduate nursing curricula.

Keywords:
nursing students; test anxiety; undergraduate programs
Repository Posting Date:
13-Jul-2017
Date of Publication:
13-Jul-2017
Other Identifiers:
INRC17P06
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
28th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Dublin, Ireland
Description:
Event Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarship

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.titleTest Anxiety Levels in Undergraduate Nursing Studentsen_US
dc.title.alternativeInfluences on Test Taking in Nursing Educationen
dc.contributor.authorRivera, Jamie Bethen
dc.contributor.departmentBeta Zeta-at-Largeen
dc.author.detailsJamie Beth Rivera, MSN, RN, CPN, Professional Experience: Certifications • (2007- present) Pediatric Nursing Board Certification (PNBC) • (2005- present) Pediatric Advanced Life Support (PALS) • (2010- present) Emergency Nurse Pediatric Certification (ENPC) • (2010- present) Trauma Nurse Course Certified (TNCC) • (2012- present) BLS Instructor Professional Organizations . 2016 - American Psychiatric Nurses Association • (2010 – present) American Nurses Association (ANA) • (2010 – present) Emergency Nurses Association (ENA) • (2015 – present) Eastern Nursing Research Society (ENRS) Author Summary: Jamie Beth Rivera is a certified pediatric nurse from the United States. She obtained her masters degree in nursing education and has pursued her passion for teaching. She is currently an assistant professor at Westfield State University. Jamie is also a University of Connecticut PhD candidate focusing her research trajectory on child and adolescent mental health. She is honored to be here today presenting her research study focusing on text anxiety in undergraduate nursing education.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/621814-
dc.description.abstract<p><strong>BACKGROUND/PURPOSE</strong><span>: For many undergraduate nursing students, performing well in required coursework is important. However, nursing students often face pressure-filled academic situation and worrying about them may inhibit their ability to demonstrate actual knowledge of course material. This can, in turn, interfere with students completing their undergraduate programs or with choosing to pursue advanced nursing degrees following graduation. The purpose of this study was to assess and compare test anxiety levels of sophomore and senior undergraduate nursing students.</span></p> <p><strong>METHODS:</strong> A convenience sample was utilized for this descriptive survey. A total of 219 nursing students completed a scale that consisted of 26 statements focusing on the cognitive domain of test anxiety. Scores could range from 26 to 104 with higher values indicating greater anxiety. Three cut-points were applied to define low (26-59), moderate (60-69), and high (70-104) anxiety groups.</p> <p><strong>RESULTS:</strong> Internal validity of the instrument was supported by a Cronbach’s alpha of 0.94. The total mean score was M = 67.5 (SD = ± 15.03) and corresponded to a moderate level of anxiety. Mean score comparisons were conducted and showed a sophomore (N = 111) mean anxiety level of 71.2 (SD = ± 14.39) and senior (N = 108) anxiety level of 63.6 ( SD = ± 14.77). The sophomore and senior anxiety levels were significantly different (p <. 001). Mean score comparisons between male (M = 66.04 SD ± 14.24 N=23) and female (M = 67.64 SD ±15.16 N= 193) students revealed no significant difference (p = 0.61). Students who had a GPA below a 3.0 had significantly higher anxiety levels (M = 83.3) than students who reported a GPA above a 3.0 (M = 66.4, p < .001).</p> <p><strong>CONCLUSION: </strong>Overall, nursing students have moderate-to-high test anxiety levels. Sophomore nursing students have higher mean levels than senior students and students who have a GPA below 3.0 have higher levels than those with GPA above 3.0. There was no difference in anxiety between male and female students. Strategies that improve managing test anxiety, such as early assessment, increased awareness, and providing anxiety-reducing interventions for students, may be appropriate additions to undergraduate nursing curricula.</p>en
dc.subjectnursing studentsen
dc.subjecttest anxietyen
dc.subjectundergraduate programsen
dc.date.available2017-07-13T14:07:51Z-
dc.date.issued2017-07-13-
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-13T14:07:51Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.name28th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.conference.locationDublin, Irelanden
dc.descriptionEvent Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarshipen
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