The "Lived Experience" of Nursing Faculty Following the Sudden Death of a Student

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/621824
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Poster
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
The "Lived Experience" of Nursing Faculty Following the Sudden Death of a Student
Author(s):
Dorney, Paulette
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Upsilon Alpha
Author Details:
Paulette Dorney, PhD, RN, Professional Experience: Dr. Paulette Dorney has over 30 years experience as a practicing registered nurse and educator in a variety of clinical and academic settings. Her diverse practice and leadership roles have covered a number of specialties including critical care, cardiology, post anesthesia care, trauma, medical surgical, staff development, quality management, and end of life care. Dr. Dorney brings a wealth of practice experience to the classroom environment. Dr. Dorney is active at the local, and national levels in professional service and has received numerous nursing honors and awards. Her current research interests focus on college student bereavement, practice readiness, and educational strategies to support the adult learner. She has conducted two phenomenological qualitative research studies, disseminating her findings through publication and national presentations. Author Summary: Dr. Paulette Dorney has over 30 years experience as a practicing registered nurse and educator in a variety of clinical and academic settings. Her current research interests focus on college student bereavement, practice readiness, and educational strategies to support the adult learner. She has conducted two phenomenological qualitative research studies, disseminating her findings through publication and national presentations.
Abstract:

Purpose: The purpose of this phenomenological qualitative research study is to explore the grief experiences and reactions of nursing faculty following the unanticipated, sudden death of a nursing student. According to the Essentials of Baccalaureate Education for Nursing Practice, ”the baccalaureate generalist graduate nurse is “…prepared to engage in care of self in order to care for others” (AACN, 2008, p. 8). While nursing faculty teach students how to care for patients and their families at end of life, little is known about the impact of a student’s death on faculty. Nursing faculty serve as teachers, role models, coaches, and mentors not only in the classroom, but also in the clinical setting. The unique closeness of this relationship poses an additional challenge to both students and faculty when a classmate suddenly dies. Nurses by the pure nature of their discipline, are perceived as providers of compassionate and supportive care to the dying and bereaved. Society presumes nursing faculty are more prepared to cope with such a stressful and devastating event since they are indeed nurses themselves, however, gaps exist in the literature regarding what support is appropriate to offer by nursing faculty. Since little is known about this phenomenon, the following research question will guide this inquiry: What is the lived experience of nursing faculty following the sudden unanticipated death of a student?

Methods: The phenomenon of “the grief experience of nursing faculty following the sudden unanticipated death of a student ” lacks both exploration and description in nursing literature. An understanding of this experience has failed to be elucidated in nursing education, warranting a need to explore this understudied phenomenon. As Field and Morse (1985) stated, “qualitative methods should be used …when the research question pertains to understanding or describing a particular event about which little is known” (p.11). Phenomenology as a qualitative research method, seeks to describe and unfold a phenomenon before the eyes of the researcher and reader so the essence of the participant’s narratives can be experienced and understood (Munhall, 1994). This approach was the most suitable method of inquiry for studying the richness and complexity of bereavement. By utilizing the phenomenological method of inquiry rooted in Husserl’s philosophy and data analysis as described by Paul Colaizzi (1978), the researcher will obtain a full description and understanding of the essence of this experience.

Results: The source of qualitative data included a demographic questionnaire and in-depth interviews with each participant. Interviews were digitally recorded, and verbatim transcriptions were analyzed utilizing the seven-step Colaizzi’s (1978) method. Findings of this study support contemporary models of grief and bereavement. Researcher will explore the unique aspects of grief that emerged for nursing faculty. 

Conclusions: This study yields a rich understanding of the grief experience of nursing faculty, while providing insights for policy development and supportive interventions for students, faculty and college administrators.

Keywords:
Grief and Bereavement; Nursing Faculty; Student Nurse Death
Repository Posting Date:
13-Jul-2017
Date of Publication:
13-Jul-2017
Other Identifiers:
INRC17PST591
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
28th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Dublin, Ireland
Description:
Event Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarship

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePosteren
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.titleThe "Lived Experience" of Nursing Faculty Following the Sudden Death of a Studenten_US
dc.contributor.authorDorney, Pauletteen
dc.contributor.departmentUpsilon Alphaen
dc.author.detailsPaulette Dorney, PhD, RN, Professional Experience: Dr. Paulette Dorney has over 30 years experience as a practicing registered nurse and educator in a variety of clinical and academic settings. Her diverse practice and leadership roles have covered a number of specialties including critical care, cardiology, post anesthesia care, trauma, medical surgical, staff development, quality management, and end of life care. Dr. Dorney brings a wealth of practice experience to the classroom environment. Dr. Dorney is active at the local, and national levels in professional service and has received numerous nursing honors and awards. Her current research interests focus on college student bereavement, practice readiness, and educational strategies to support the adult learner. She has conducted two phenomenological qualitative research studies, disseminating her findings through publication and national presentations. Author Summary: Dr. Paulette Dorney has over 30 years experience as a practicing registered nurse and educator in a variety of clinical and academic settings. Her current research interests focus on college student bereavement, practice readiness, and educational strategies to support the adult learner. She has conducted two phenomenological qualitative research studies, disseminating her findings through publication and national presentations.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/621824-
dc.description.abstract<p><strong><strong>Purpose: </strong></strong><span>The purpose of this phenomenological qualitative research study is to explore the grief experiences and reactions of nursing faculty following the unanticipated, sudden death of a nursing student. According to the Essentials of Baccalaureate Education for Nursing Practice, ”the baccalaureate generalist graduate nurse is “…prepared to engage in care of self in order to care for others” (AACN, 2008, p. 8). While nursing faculty teach students how to care for patients and their families at end of life, little is known about the impact of a student’s death on faculty. Nursing faculty serve as teachers, role models, coaches, and mentors not only in the classroom, but also in the clinical setting. The unique closeness of this relationship poses an additional challenge to both students and faculty when a classmate suddenly dies. Nurses by the pure nature of their discipline, are perceived as providers of compassionate and supportive care to the dying and bereaved. Society presumes nursing faculty are more prepared to cope with such a stressful and devastating event since they are indeed nurses themselves, however, gaps exist in the literature regarding what support is appropriate to offer by nursing faculty. Since little is known about this phenomenon, the following research question will guide this inquiry: What is the lived experience of nursing faculty following the sudden unanticipated death of a student?</span></p> <p><strong>Methods: </strong>The phenomenon of “the grief experience of nursing faculty following the sudden unanticipated death of a student ” lacks both exploration and description in nursing literature. An understanding of this experience has failed to be elucidated in nursing education, warranting a need to explore this understudied phenomenon. As Field and Morse (1985) stated, “qualitative methods should be used …when the research question pertains to understanding or describing a particular event about which little is known” (p.11). Phenomenology as a qualitative research method, seeks to describe and unfold a phenomenon before the eyes of the researcher and reader so the essence of the participant’s narratives can be experienced and understood (Munhall, 1994). This approach was the most suitable method of inquiry for studying the richness and complexity of bereavement. By utilizing the phenomenological method of inquiry rooted in Husserl’s philosophy and data analysis as described by Paul Colaizzi (1978), the researcher will obtain a full description and understanding of the essence of this experience.</p> <p><strong>Results: </strong>The source of qualitative data included a demographic questionnaire and in-depth interviews with each participant. Interviews were digitally recorded, and verbatim transcriptions were analyzed utilizing the seven-step Colaizzi’s (1978) method. Findings of this study support contemporary models of grief and bereavement. Researcher will explore the unique aspects of grief that emerged for nursing faculty. <strong></strong></p> <p><strong>Conclusions: </strong>This study yields a rich understanding of the grief experience of nursing faculty, while providing insights for policy development and supportive interventions for students, faculty and college administrators.</p>en
dc.subjectGrief and Bereavementen
dc.subjectNursing Facultyen
dc.subjectStudent Nurse Deathen
dc.date.available2017-07-13T16:19:20Z-
dc.date.issued2017-07-13-
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-13T16:19:20Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.name28th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.conference.locationDublin, Irelanden
dc.descriptionEvent Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarshipen
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.