An Innovative Approach to Teaching Genetics to Graduate Nursing Students Using Interprofessional Teaching Modalities

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/621840
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
An Innovative Approach to Teaching Genetics to Graduate Nursing Students Using Interprofessional Teaching Modalities
Other Titles:
Genetic Health
Author(s):
Lee, Dorothy S.; Panepucci, Sharon K.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Theta Chi
Author Details:
Dorothy S. Lee, PhD, RN, ANP-BC, FNP-BC, CME, Professional Experience: Dorothy S. Lee Ph.D. is a Professor of Nursing at Saginaw Valley State University teaching undergraduate pharmacology, and graduate advanced pharmacology, advanced pathophysiology, and advanced physical assessment. Dr. Lee is the PI of a HRSA Grant funded in July 2014. She practices as a Family Nurse Practitioner at the University Clinic in Bay City, MI, serving individuals with multiple comorbid conditions and barriers to access to care. Author Summary: Dorothy S. Lee Ph.D. is a Professor of Nursing at Saginaw Valley State University. She earned a Ph.D. in Nursing from Wayne State University and practices as a Nurse Practitioner at the University Clinic at the Bay Count Health Department. Dr. Lee is the Principal Investigator of a HRSA Grant funded in July 2014 entitled “Nurse-led Interprofessional Clinic to benefit Underinsured Individuals and Veterans with Multiple Comorbid Conditions and Health Care Access Barriers.
Abstract:

Purpose: To present an innovative approach to teaching genetics to graduate nursing students using interprofessional teaching modalities.

The Masters’ Essentials (2011) mandate the integration of genetic and genomic evidence into the graduate nursing curriculum for use in advanced nursing practice. Faculty strive to answer the question: How can we incorporate current and emerging genetic/genomic evidence into the Masters’ Curriculum to promulgate the provision of advanced nursing care to individuals, families and communities utilizing a meaningful, interactive, and motivating approach?

Since the first draft sequences of the human genome (International Human Genome Sequencing Consortium, 2001) the study of human genetics has developed exponentially. Patient’s genomic information is currently being used in their clinical care by multiple institutions. Therefore, how can faculty ensure that graduate nursing clinicians have the necessary genetic knowledge to apply genetics/ genomics in a clinical setting?

Methods:

An active teaching strategy that fosters critical thinking in students is simulation; yet the use of simulation in graduate nursing education is limited. The design and implementation of interprofessional simulations was used to increase confidence, critical thinking and clinical decision making in graduate nursing students. The simulations embodied the presentation, assessment, diagnostics, and intrprofessional outreach needed to arrive at and deliver the diagnosis to the family in an emotionally and educationally supportive manner. The scenario for this strategy focused on the diagnosis of Downs Syndrome.

In addition, concept mapping and reflective thinking were found to be effective strategies to guide students in expressing the meaning of the material and identifying strengths and weaknesses in their thought processes. Both of these strategies were utilized to measure the integration of genetic/genomic knowledge at the clinical and personal level. These complex concept maps encompassed all aspects of the diagnostic and care plan for the family experiencing a genetic disorder such as: the location of the gene on the chromosome, the physical presentation, the diagnostic work up, the treatment, referrals to specialists to assist in treatment of the disorder, and finally the community resources needed for quality of life of the patient and family.

Lastly, the use of a panel discussion was extremely beneficial to impact student learning regarding patients who had experience with cancer that may or may not have had a genetic etiology, and their degree of willingness to pursue genetic testing. This learning modality created a vividly realistic atmosphere as the panelists related their cancer journey. The students researched and composed the panel questions that were preapproved by faculty and were shared with the panelists prior to the panel discussion. By examining the lived experiences of cancer survivors (i.e. what parts of their clinical treatment and care were supportive and which parts caused them despair) the graduate nursing students learned about shared responsibility and empathy of clinicians.

Results: The student evaluations of the teaching techniques were extremely positive: ""Having interprofessional interactive sims was helpful in making connections and furthering my understanding", "The concept maps allowed us to feel the investment of the sim character's viewpoint", "The debriefing after the cancer panel was very powerful & emotional. The panelists gave us a valuable glimpse into their journeys; I learned a lot!" and "The simulations complemented the genetics info well".

Conclusion: The use of genetic-based interprofessional sims set the stage for students to engage in a variety of teaching strategies to facilitate learning, critical thinking, and foster clinical decision making in graduate nursing students.

Keywords:
genetics/genomics; interprofessional education and simulation; concept mapping; panel discussion
Repository Posting Date:
14-Jul-2017
Date of Publication:
14-Jul-2017
Other Identifiers:
INRC17M06
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
28th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Dublin, Ireland
Description:
Event Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarship

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.titleAn Innovative Approach to Teaching Genetics to Graduate Nursing Students Using Interprofessional Teaching Modalitiesen_US
dc.title.alternativeGenetic Healthen
dc.contributor.authorLee, Dorothy S.en
dc.contributor.authorPanepucci, Sharon K.en
dc.contributor.departmentTheta Chien
dc.author.detailsDorothy S. Lee, PhD, RN, ANP-BC, FNP-BC, CME, Professional Experience: Dorothy S. Lee Ph.D. is a Professor of Nursing at Saginaw Valley State University teaching undergraduate pharmacology, and graduate advanced pharmacology, advanced pathophysiology, and advanced physical assessment. Dr. Lee is the PI of a HRSA Grant funded in July 2014. She practices as a Family Nurse Practitioner at the University Clinic in Bay City, MI, serving individuals with multiple comorbid conditions and barriers to access to care. Author Summary: Dorothy S. Lee Ph.D. is a Professor of Nursing at Saginaw Valley State University. She earned a Ph.D. in Nursing from Wayne State University and practices as a Nurse Practitioner at the University Clinic at the Bay Count Health Department. Dr. Lee is the Principal Investigator of a HRSA Grant funded in July 2014 entitled “Nurse-led Interprofessional Clinic to benefit Underinsured Individuals and Veterans with Multiple Comorbid Conditions and Health Care Access Barriers.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/621840-
dc.description.abstract<p><strong><strong>Purpose: </strong></strong><span>To present an innovative approach to teaching genetics to graduate nursing students using interprofessional teaching modalities.</span></p> <p>The Masters’ Essentials (2011) mandate the integration of genetic and genomic evidence into the graduate nursing curriculum for use in advanced nursing practice. Faculty strive to answer the question: How can we incorporate current and emerging genetic/genomic evidence into the Masters’ Curriculum to promulgate the provision of advanced nursing care to individuals, families and communities utilizing a meaningful, interactive, and motivating approach?</p> <p>Since the first draft sequences of the human genome (International Human Genome Sequencing Consortium, 2001) the study of human genetics has developed exponentially. Patient’s genomic information is currently being used in their clinical care by multiple institutions. Therefore, how can faculty ensure that graduate nursing clinicians have the necessary genetic knowledge to apply genetics/ genomics in a clinical setting?</p> <p><strong>Methods:</strong></p> <p>An active teaching strategy that fosters critical thinking in students is simulation; yet the use of simulation in graduate nursing education is limited. The design and implementation of interprofessional simulations was used to increase confidence, critical thinking and clinical decision making in graduate nursing students. The simulations embodied the presentation, assessment, diagnostics, and intrprofessional outreach needed to arrive at and deliver the diagnosis to the family in an emotionally and educationally supportive manner. The scenario for this strategy focused on the diagnosis of Downs Syndrome.</p> <p>In addition, concept mapping and reflective thinking were found to be effective strategies to guide students in expressing the meaning of the material and identifying strengths and weaknesses in their thought processes. Both of these strategies were utilized to measure the integration of genetic/genomic knowledge at the clinical and personal level. These complex concept maps encompassed all aspects of the diagnostic and care plan for the family experiencing a genetic disorder such as: the location of the gene on the chromosome, the physical presentation, the diagnostic work up, the treatment, referrals to specialists to assist in treatment of the disorder, and finally the community resources needed for quality of life of the patient and family.</p> <p>Lastly, the use of a panel discussion was extremely beneficial to impact student learning regarding patients who had experience with cancer that may or may not have had a genetic etiology, and their degree of willingness to pursue genetic testing. This learning modality created a vividly realistic atmosphere as the panelists related their cancer journey. The students researched and composed the panel questions that were preapproved by faculty and were shared with the panelists prior to the panel discussion. By examining the lived experiences of cancer survivors (i.e. what parts of their clinical treatment and care were supportive and which parts caused them despair) the graduate nursing students learned about shared responsibility and empathy of clinicians.</p> <p><strong>Results: </strong>The student evaluations of the teaching techniques were extremely positive: ""Having interprofessional interactive sims was helpful in making connections and furthering my understanding", "The concept maps allowed us to feel the investment of the sim character's viewpoint", "The debriefing after the cancer panel was very powerful & emotional. The panelists gave us a valuable glimpse into their journeys; I learned a lot!" and "The simulations complemented the genetics info well".</p> <p><strong>Conclusion: </strong>The use of genetic-based interprofessional sims set the stage for students to engage in a variety of teaching strategies to facilitate learning, critical thinking, and foster clinical decision making in graduate nursing students.</p>en
dc.subjectgenetics/genomicsen
dc.subjectinterprofessional education and simulationen
dc.subjectconcept mappingen
dc.subjectpanel discussionen
dc.date.available2017-07-14T13:41:14Z-
dc.date.issued2017-07-14-
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-14T13:41:14Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.name28th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.conference.locationDublin, Irelanden
dc.descriptionEvent Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarshipen
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