Measuring High-Fidelity Simulation Instruction: Its Effects to Knowledge, Skills, and Attitudes Toward Patient Safety

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/621844
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Poster
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
Measuring High-Fidelity Simulation Instruction: Its Effects to Knowledge, Skills, and Attitudes Toward Patient Safety
Author(s):
Rarang, Sasha Alexis
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Sasha Alexis Rarang, PhD, MSN, RN, CCM, Professional Experience: Nursing Simulation Instructor - West Coast University, Los Angeles, CA January 2015 – present Assistant Professor of Nursing - West Coast University, Los Angeles, CA 2010 – present. Adjunct Faculty - Graduate and undergraduate nursing program, Shepherd University, Los Angeles, CA June 2010 – Present Author Summary: Respected health care professional with over 20 years experience in clinical nursing, administration and most recently interested in research in nursing with focus on nursing education. Expertise in nursing include pediatric nursing, medical-surgical nursing, case management, and nursing simulation education.
Abstract:

Nursing practice requires measures that promote patient safety. Gregory, Guse, Dick, and Russell (2007) stated that in today’s healthcare environment, patient safety serves as a crucial factor in determining quality of patient care through decreasing patient care errors. The integration of high-fidelity simulation (HFS) in the undergraduate nursing curriculum had required evidence that supported the acquisition of learning outcomes which includes KSAs towards patient safety (Howard, Ross, Mitchell, & Nelson, 2010). Therefore, a need of validating scenario-based HFS as a learning pedagogy towards patient safety was needed (Robertson, 2011).

 Purpose:

The purpose of this quasi-experimental non-equivalent control pretest-posttest study was to determine if there was a statistically significant difference in the posttest scores of knowledge, skills, and attitudes towards patient safety among the beginning nursing students in a private accelerated baccalaureate nursing program in the Western United States.

 Methods:

The study used a quasi-experimental nonequivalent control posttest design using beginning nursing students as samples through convenience sampling method with a the total sample of 156 subjects that were randomly assigned to both control and treatment groups.

Results:

The data analyzed were scores from the H-PEPSS survey posttest (Ginsburg, Castel, Tregunno, & Norton, P. G., 2012) questions corresponding to six patient safety categories. Descriptive statistics and independent t-test for analysis of mean difference was used. In all three categories, statistically significant difference was found legitimizing the efficacy of scenario-based HFPS as a teaching pedagogy (Gates et al, 2011). It is recommended that a broader study that utilizes faculty observed performance towards acquisition of KSAs of patient safety be used rather than students’ perspective (Blum & Parcells, 2010). Conduct a longitudinal study in determining knowledge and skills retention and transferability in both the simulation and clinical settings as well as using a broader demographic of nursing student population.

Conclusion:

It is recommended by this study to conduct a broader study that may include the use of faculty observed performance that focuses more on student’s acquisition of KSAs towards patient safety rather than sole students’ perspective (Blum & Parcells, 2010). Conduct a longitudinal study determining knowledge and skills retention and transferability combining faculty and student evaluations relevant to patient safety in both the simulation and clinical settings as well as using a broader demographic of nursing student population, including students from traditional baccalaureate and associate degree nursing programs. The results of this study add to the existing literature in providing evidence that scenario-based HFS is an effective teaching methodology towards acquisition of KSAs of patient safety, understanding of its important in the undergraduate nursing curriculum in meeting certain learning objectives and justify its use as an alternative teaching methodology for clinical experience.

Keywords:
high-fidelity nursing simulation; knowledge, skills, and attitudes; patient safety
Repository Posting Date:
14-Jul-2017
Date of Publication:
14-Jul-2017
Other Identifiers:
INRC17PST429
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
28th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Dublin, Ireland
Description:
Event Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarship

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePosteren
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.titleMeasuring High-Fidelity Simulation Instruction: Its Effects to Knowledge, Skills, and Attitudes Toward Patient Safetyen_US
dc.contributor.authorRarang, Sasha Alexisen
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen
dc.author.detailsSasha Alexis Rarang, PhD, MSN, RN, CCM, Professional Experience: Nursing Simulation Instructor - West Coast University, Los Angeles, CA January 2015 – present Assistant Professor of Nursing - West Coast University, Los Angeles, CA 2010 – present. Adjunct Faculty - Graduate and undergraduate nursing program, Shepherd University, Los Angeles, CA June 2010 – Present Author Summary: Respected health care professional with over 20 years experience in clinical nursing, administration and most recently interested in research in nursing with focus on nursing education. Expertise in nursing include pediatric nursing, medical-surgical nursing, case management, and nursing simulation education.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/621844-
dc.description.abstract<p>Nursing practice requires measures that promote patient safety. Gregory, Guse, Dick, and Russell (2007) stated that in today’s healthcare environment, patient safety serves as a crucial factor in determining quality of patient care through decreasing patient care errors. The integration of high-fidelity simulation (HFS) in the undergraduate nursing curriculum had required evidence that supported the acquisition of learning outcomes which includes KSAs towards patient safety (Howard, Ross, Mitchell, & Nelson, 2010). Therefore, a need of validating scenario-based HFS as a learning pedagogy towards patient safety was needed (Robertson, 2011).</p> <p> <strong>Purpose:</strong></p> <p>The purpose of this quasi-experimental non-equivalent control pretest-posttest study was to determine if there was a statistically significant difference in the posttest scores of knowledge, skills, and attitudes towards patient safety among the beginning nursing students in a private accelerated baccalaureate nursing program in the Western United States.</p> <p> <strong>Methods:</strong></p> <p>The study used a quasi-experimental nonequivalent control posttest design using beginning nursing students as samples through convenience sampling method with a the total sample of 156 subjects that were randomly assigned to both control and treatment groups.</p> <p><strong>Results:</strong></p> <p>The data analyzed were scores from the H-PEPSS survey posttest (Ginsburg, Castel, Tregunno, & Norton, P. G., 2012) questions corresponding to six patient safety categories. Descriptive statistics and independent t-test for analysis of mean difference was used. In all three categories, statistically significant difference was found legitimizing the efficacy of scenario-based HFPS as a teaching pedagogy (Gates et al, 2011). It is recommended that a broader study that utilizes faculty observed performance towards acquisition of KSAs of patient safety be used rather than students’ perspective (Blum & Parcells, 2010). Conduct a longitudinal study in determining knowledge and skills retention and transferability in both the simulation and clinical settings as well as using a broader demographic of nursing student population.</p> <p><strong>Conclusion:</strong></p> <p>It is recommended by this study to conduct a broader study that may include the use of faculty observed performance that focuses more on student’s acquisition of KSAs towards patient safety rather than sole students’ perspective (Blum & Parcells, 2010). Conduct a longitudinal study determining knowledge and skills retention and transferability combining faculty and student evaluations relevant to patient safety in both the simulation and clinical settings as well as using a broader demographic of nursing student population, including students from traditional baccalaureate and associate degree nursing programs. The results of this study add to the existing literature in providing evidence that scenario-based HFS is an effective teaching methodology towards acquisition of KSAs of patient safety, understanding of its important in the undergraduate nursing curriculum in meeting certain learning objectives and justify its use as an alternative teaching methodology for clinical experience.</p>en
dc.subjecthigh-fidelity nursing simulationen
dc.subjectknowledge, skills, and attitudesen
dc.subjectpatient safetyen
dc.date.available2017-07-14T16:25:37Z-
dc.date.issued2017-07-14-
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-14T16:25:37Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.name28th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.conference.locationDublin, Irelanden
dc.descriptionEvent Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarshipen
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