Evidence-Based Research and Delayed Cord Clamping: Implications for Cross-Cultural Education, Research, and Policy

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/621845
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
Evidence-Based Research and Delayed Cord Clamping: Implications for Cross-Cultural Education, Research, and Policy
Other Titles:
Global Midwifery Practices
Author(s):
Faucher, Mary Ann
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Eta Gamma
Author Details:
Mary Ann Faucher, PhD, MPH, MS, BS, RN, CNM, FACNM, Professional Experience: Certified and practicing midwife in the U.S. since 1983. Tenured professor of nursing since 2006. Established and funded nursing researcher. More than 50 publications in peer-reviewed nursing,medical and health science journals. Associate Editor of the Journal of Midwifery & Women's Health. Author Summary: Dr.Faucher is a tenured associate professor at Baylor University in Texas. Her major research focuses on obesity, gestational weight gain and outcomes of pregnancy using a bio-behavioral approach to investigations. Her research internationally relates to capacity building in midwifery and translation of evidence into practice to improve maternal and child health. She has authored more than 60 articles in peer-reviewed journals. She is an associate editor of the Journal of Midwifery & Women's Health.
Abstract:

Purpose: Conduct an educational capacity building research initiative for nurse midwives in India to improve iron status of newborns by delaying the clamping of the umbilical cord at birth. In India, iron deficiency affects nearly 80% of reproductive aged women and their offspring (Viveki 2012). Compared to immediate cord clamping, delayed cord clamping is a physiologic practice that also results in significantly enhanced serum levels of iron in newborns up to 6 months after birth (McDonald et al., 2013).

Methods: A two-part research design was implemented. Part 1 was quantitative utilizing a single group pre and post-test research design incorporating lecture and simulation. In Part 2, ten months after completion of Part 1, focus groups were conducted with the same group of nurse midwives about the benefits and barriers to implementation of delayed cord clamping.

Results: Significant improvement in knowledge, beliefs and the practice of delayed cord clamping were found comparing pre-test to post-test results both immediately after the intervention and at a 10-month follow-up visit. Simulation revealed important nuances of midwifery practice pertinent to the uptake of delayed cord clamping. Results from the focus groups illuminate perceived factors that affect midwife decision-making, areas of concern related to practice and perceived benefits of delayed cord clamping expressed by the nurse midwives.

Conclusions: One consequence of the medicalization of childbirth is immediate clamping of the umbilical cord at birth resulting in the newborn not receiving a significant amount of blood from the placenta that provides a substantial source of iron (McDonald et al., 2013). The upscaling of midwifery practice and education has been recommended as a strategy to improve maternal and infant outcomes around the world including in India, to address both the qualifications of midwives and the escalating rates of cesarean birth (Renfrew et al., 2014). Findings from this study have implications for cross cultural education with nurse midwives, research design, policy, , and keys to sustainability of evidence base-practice in this setting.

Keywords:
cross-cultural; nursing educational research; policy
Repository Posting Date:
14-Jul-2017
Date of Publication:
14-Jul-2017
Other Identifiers:
INRC17C08
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
28th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Dublin, Ireland
Description:
Event Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarship

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.titleEvidence-Based Research and Delayed Cord Clamping: Implications for Cross-Cultural Education, Research, and Policyen_US
dc.title.alternativeGlobal Midwifery Practicesen
dc.contributor.authorFaucher, Mary Annen
dc.contributor.departmentEta Gammaen
dc.author.detailsMary Ann Faucher, PhD, MPH, MS, BS, RN, CNM, FACNM, Professional Experience: Certified and practicing midwife in the U.S. since 1983. Tenured professor of nursing since 2006. Established and funded nursing researcher. More than 50 publications in peer-reviewed nursing,medical and health science journals. Associate Editor of the Journal of Midwifery & Women's Health. Author Summary: Dr.Faucher is a tenured associate professor at Baylor University in Texas. Her major research focuses on obesity, gestational weight gain and outcomes of pregnancy using a bio-behavioral approach to investigations. Her research internationally relates to capacity building in midwifery and translation of evidence into practice to improve maternal and child health. She has authored more than 60 articles in peer-reviewed journals. She is an associate editor of the Journal of Midwifery & Women's Health.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/621845-
dc.description.abstract<p><strong>Purpose: </strong><span>Conduct an educational capacity building research initiative for nurse midwives in India to improve iron status of newborns by delaying the clamping of the umbilical cord at birth. In India, iron deficiency affects nearly 80% of reproductive aged women and their offspring (Viveki 2012). Compared to immediate cord clamping, delayed cord clamping is a physiologic practice that also results in significantly enhanced serum levels of iron in newborns up to 6 months after birth (McDonald et al., 2013).</span></p> <p><strong>Methods: </strong>A two-part research design was implemented. Part 1 was quantitative utilizing a single group pre and post-test research design incorporating lecture and simulation. In Part 2, ten months after completion of Part 1, focus groups were conducted with the same group of nurse midwives about the benefits and barriers to implementation of delayed cord clamping.</p> <p><strong>Results: </strong>Significant improvement in knowledge, beliefs and the practice of delayed cord clamping were found comparing pre-test to post-test results both immediately after the intervention and at a 10-month follow-up visit. Simulation revealed important nuances of midwifery practice pertinent to the uptake of delayed cord clamping. Results from the focus groups illuminate perceived factors that affect midwife decision-making, areas of concern related to practice and perceived benefits of delayed cord clamping expressed by the nurse midwives.</p> <p><strong>Conclusions: </strong>One consequence of the medicalization of childbirth is immediate clamping of the umbilical cord at birth resulting in the newborn not receiving a significant amount of blood from the placenta that provides a substantial source of iron (McDonald et al., 2013). The upscaling of midwifery practice and education has been recommended as a strategy to improve maternal and infant outcomes around the world including in India, to address both the qualifications of midwives and the escalating rates of cesarean birth (Renfrew et al., 2014). Findings from this study have implications for cross cultural education with nurse midwives, research design, policy, , and keys to sustainability of evidence base-practice in this setting.</p>en
dc.subjectcross-culturalen
dc.subjectnursing educational researchen
dc.subjectpolicyen
dc.date.available2017-07-14T16:35:06Z-
dc.date.issued2017-07-14-
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-14T16:35:06Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.name28th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.conference.locationDublin, Irelanden
dc.descriptionEvent Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarshipen
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