How Do Student Nurses in Malawi Choose, Adapt to Career Transition, and Construct Careers?

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/621846
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Poster
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
How Do Student Nurses in Malawi Choose, Adapt to Career Transition, and Construct Careers?
Author(s):
Dembo, Zione; Chilemba, Evelyn Baxter
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Chi-at-Large
Author Details:
Zione Dembo, MSc, BSc, RNM, Professional Experience: 2015 to date - Project Manager, Parent and Child Health Initiative (PACHI) a local NGO in Malawi 2013- 2015 - Public health and SRH Consultant, Centre for Public Health Policy, Research and Development consultancy firm 2010 - 2012 - Community activities Coordinator for clinical trial research projects, University of North Carolina (UNC) Malawi Project 2006 - 2010 - Nursing Officer, Mchinji and Bwaila district hospitals. Malawi Ministry of Health Responsible for development and management of research and development projects focusing on maternal, newborn and child health (MNH) Experienced researcher in clinical trials and social research. Has clinical practice experience in nursing, midwifery care and sexual and reproductive health services. Author or coauthor of various abstracts relating to MNCH and presented at scientific meetings. Author Summary: A registered nurse and midwife. Holder of a Master’s of science degree in international health with a specialization in Sexual and reproductive health. A manager with nine years experience in the management of public health programs,SRH and HIV/AIDS in the Malawi health sector Experienced researcher in clinical trials and social research. The current presentation is on preliminary results of a research study which the presenter is managing in Malawi.
Abstract:

Purpose:

As demand for nurses continues to surpass supply in Malawi it is important to understand what motivates new entrants to join and remain in the profession. The objectives of this study were to understand students’ motivations for choosing nursing and their future career plan which has implications for developing strategies to enhance professional satisfaction and career fulfilment.

Methods:

The study used qualitative study methods. A purposively selected sample size of 37 final year students was used. There were 16 individual in depth interviews and 3focus group discussions. The study was conducted in 2 colleges of nursing in Malawi; Nkhoma College which trains diploma students and Kamuzu College of Nursing (KCN) which trains BSc nurses. Interviews covered how and why nurses entered nursing, their training experiences and future career plans. Data were analysed using thematic analysis.

Results:

The findings highlight that the choice of nursing course was influenced by desire to help people, admiration from significant others including nurse models, anticipated career rewards while almost half was by default however their training experiences were crucial to reframing nursing as a ‘suitable job’. For nearly all students the impact of training experiences through contact with coursework, practical and lecturers on career choice were marked. Nursing was seen as a viable career particularly for undergraduate students from KCN, where it is regarded ‘a guaranteed job with prospects’. Almost all nurses interviewed intended to seek employment in public sector citing theirs reason as opportunities to pursue advanced nursing qualification to satisfy career objectives; increased knowledge, skills and economic rewards. Undesirably, most students indicated preference to have non clinical job after attaining higher qualifications following observation that that there are no established clinical job post for nurse specialist in Malawi.

Conclusion:

Findings suggest that preservice orientation remains a key factor in choosing nursing. Students also look for a career which offer professional values and rewards. If advanced clinical nursing practioner career path remain undefined nursing may be in danger of losing service orientated recruits to other non-clinical professions.

Keywords:
motivation; students; career aspirations
Repository Posting Date:
14-Jul-2017
Date of Publication:
14-Jul-2017
Other Identifiers:
INRC17PST
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
28th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Dublin, Ireland
Description:
Event Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarship

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePosteren
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.titleHow Do Student Nurses in Malawi Choose, Adapt to Career Transition, and Construct Careers?en_US
dc.contributor.authorDembo, Zioneen
dc.contributor.authorChilemba, Evelyn Baxteren
dc.contributor.departmentChi-at-Largeen
dc.author.detailsZione Dembo, MSc, BSc, RNM, Professional Experience: 2015 to date - Project Manager, Parent and Child Health Initiative (PACHI) a local NGO in Malawi 2013- 2015 - Public health and SRH Consultant, Centre for Public Health Policy, Research and Development consultancy firm 2010 - 2012 - Community activities Coordinator for clinical trial research projects, University of North Carolina (UNC) Malawi Project 2006 - 2010 - Nursing Officer, Mchinji and Bwaila district hospitals. Malawi Ministry of Health Responsible for development and management of research and development projects focusing on maternal, newborn and child health (MNH) Experienced researcher in clinical trials and social research. Has clinical practice experience in nursing, midwifery care and sexual and reproductive health services. Author or coauthor of various abstracts relating to MNCH and presented at scientific meetings. Author Summary: A registered nurse and midwife. Holder of a Master’s of science degree in international health with a specialization in Sexual and reproductive health. A manager with nine years experience in the management of public health programs,SRH and HIV/AIDS in the Malawi health sector Experienced researcher in clinical trials and social research. The current presentation is on preliminary results of a research study which the presenter is managing in Malawi.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/621846-
dc.description.abstract<p><strong><strong>Purpose:</strong></strong></p> <p>As demand for nurses continues to surpass supply in Malawi it is important to understand what motivates new entrants to join and remain in the profession. The objectives of this study were to understand students’ motivations for choosing nursing and their future career plan which has implications for developing strategies to<strong> </strong>enhance professional satisfaction and career fulfilment.</p> <p><strong>Methods:</strong></p> <p>The study used qualitative study methods. A purposively selected sample size of 37 final year students was used. There were 16 individual in depth interviews and 3focus group discussions. The study was conducted in 2 colleges of nursing in Malawi; Nkhoma College which trains diploma students and Kamuzu College of Nursing (KCN) which trains BSc nurses. Interviews covered how and why nurses entered nursing, their training experiences and future career plans. Data were analysed using thematic analysis.</p> <p><strong>Results:</strong></p> <p>The findings highlight that the choice of nursing course was influenced by desire to help people, admiration from significant others including nurse models, anticipated career rewards while almost half was by default however their training experiences were crucial to reframing nursing as a ‘suitable job’. For nearly all students the impact of training experiences through contact with coursework, practical and lecturers on career choice were marked. Nursing was seen as a viable career particularly for undergraduate students from KCN, where it is regarded ‘a guaranteed job with prospects’. Almost all nurses interviewed intended to seek employment in public sector citing theirs reason as opportunities to pursue advanced nursing qualification to satisfy career objectives; increased knowledge, skills and economic rewards. Undesirably, most students indicated preference to have non clinical job after attaining higher qualifications following observation that that there are no established clinical job post for nurse specialist in Malawi.</p> <p><strong>Conclusion:</strong></p> <p>Findings suggest that preservice orientation remains a key factor in choosing nursing. Students also look for a career which offer professional values and rewards. If advanced clinical nursing practioner career path remain undefined nursing may be in danger of losing service orientated recruits to other non-clinical professions.</p>en
dc.subjectmotivationen
dc.subjectstudentsen
dc.subjectcareer aspirationsen
dc.date.available2017-07-14T16:52:03Z-
dc.date.issued2017-07-14-
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-14T16:52:03Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.name28th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.conference.locationDublin, Irelanden
dc.descriptionEvent Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarshipen
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