Description and Meaning of Clinical Competency: Perceptions of Nurse Managers and Baccalaureate Nurse Faculty

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/621858
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
Description and Meaning of Clinical Competency: Perceptions of Nurse Managers and Baccalaureate Nurse Faculty
Other Titles:
Defining the Nurse Faculty Role
Author(s):
Meehan, Carolyn D.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Xi Delta
Author Details:
Carolyn D. Meehan, PhD, RN, Professional Experience: Assistant Professor of Nursing at West Chester University (2013- to present)teaching in both the undergraduate and second degree program. Mercy Home Health- Clinical Practice (1998- to present)caring for the underserved adult population in the community. Dr. A.S. Jennings, MD-(1990-2011) Collaborative practice as the nurse practitioner in a University Hospital Endocrine Practice. Author Summary: Dr. Meehan is an Assistant Professor of Nursing at West Chester University of Pennsylvania. She received her bachelor of science in nursing from Bloomsburg University, her Master of Science in Nursing in a nurse practitioner program from the University of Pennsylvania and a PhD in nursing science and research from Widener University. She’s practiced in various areas of nursing for the last 34 years. In addition to teaching, she practices in the community setting.
Abstract:

Purpose:

Clinical competency is a significant concept for nursing as it relates directly to the quality of patient care that nurses provide in the healthcare setting. Despite the vital nature of this concept, in the literature, there is currently no widely accepted understanding of the term between the academic and clinical groups in nursing. Consequently, there is a continuous struggle to set standards to measure clinical competency in undergraduate nursing students. This imprecise understanding of clinical competency widens the gap between education and practice. When acute care nurse managers and prelicensure baccalaureate nurse faculty share expectations of what constitutes clinical competency in nursing students, that gap may be bridged. The focus of this interpretive description study was to describe and gain an understanding of the concept of clinical competency from the perspective of acute care nurse managers and baccalaureate nurse faculty.

Methods:

A purposive sample was recruited through the snowballing method. Participants included eight acute care nurse managers and nine prelicensure baccalaureate nurse faculty. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews with the participants, and analyzed through a constant comparative analysis until the data reached saturation.

Results:

Four themes emerged from the data of this interpretive description study when acute care managers and baccalaureate nurse faculty described the meaning of clinical competency and what expectations managers have of the new graduate nurse in regards to clinical competency. The themes are applying metacognitive judgment, getting the big picture, providing safe care, and developing professional nursing behaviors. This study presents Transitions Theory as a theoretical framework to support its findings, as student nurses transition to the role of the new graduate nurse in the acute care setting. The application of the four themes described in this study to Transitions Theory assists in further understanding the meaning of clinical competency in nursing.

Conclusion:

Implications of this study from the perspective of nursing science and research offered for the first time a shared view of the concept of clinical competency from the perception of the managers in practice and the faculty educating undergraduate nursing students in the clinical area. Implications for nursing education included providing faculty a means to structure the clinical experience so that students may be better prepared to practice in the acute care setting as a new graduate nurse. In nursing practice, the benefits for the managers are an understanding of the level of clinical competency and preparation of the new graduate nurse, which enables them to further support their transition to clinical practice. Future research may include a tool for the objective measurement of clinical competency.

Keywords:
Clinical Competency; Interpretive Description Qualitative Research; Nursing Education
Repository Posting Date:
17-Jul-2017
Date of Publication:
17-Jul-2017
Other Identifiers:
INRC17C17
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
28th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Dublin, Ireland
Description:
Event Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarship

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.titleDescription and Meaning of Clinical Competency: Perceptions of Nurse Managers and Baccalaureate Nurse Facultyen_US
dc.title.alternativeDefining the Nurse Faculty Roleen
dc.contributor.authorMeehan, Carolyn D.en
dc.contributor.departmentXi Deltaen
dc.author.detailsCarolyn D. Meehan, PhD, RN, Professional Experience: Assistant Professor of Nursing at West Chester University (2013- to present)teaching in both the undergraduate and second degree program. Mercy Home Health- Clinical Practice (1998- to present)caring for the underserved adult population in the community. Dr. A.S. Jennings, MD-(1990-2011) Collaborative practice as the nurse practitioner in a University Hospital Endocrine Practice. Author Summary: Dr. Meehan is an Assistant Professor of Nursing at West Chester University of Pennsylvania. She received her bachelor of science in nursing from Bloomsburg University, her Master of Science in Nursing in a nurse practitioner program from the University of Pennsylvania and a PhD in nursing science and research from Widener University. She’s practiced in various areas of nursing for the last 34 years. In addition to teaching, she practices in the community setting.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/621858-
dc.description.abstract<p><strong>Purpose:</strong></p> <p>Clinical competency is a significant concept for nursing as it relates directly to the quality of patient care that nurses provide in the healthcare setting. Despite the vital nature of this concept, in the literature, there is currently no widely accepted understanding of the term between the academic and clinical groups in nursing. Consequently, there is a continuous struggle to set standards to measure clinical competency in undergraduate nursing students. This imprecise understanding of clinical competency widens the gap between education and practice. When acute care nurse managers and prelicensure baccalaureate nurse faculty share expectations of what constitutes clinical competency in nursing students, that gap may be bridged. The focus of this interpretive description study was to describe and gain an understanding of the concept of clinical competency from the perspective of acute care nurse managers and baccalaureate nurse faculty.</p> <p><strong>Methods:</strong></p> <p>A purposive sample was recruited through the snowballing method. Participants included eight acute care nurse managers and nine prelicensure baccalaureate nurse faculty. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews with the participants, and analyzed through a constant comparative analysis until the data reached saturation.</p> <p><strong>Results:</strong></p> <p>Four themes emerged from the data of this interpretive description study when acute care managers and baccalaureate nurse faculty described the meaning of clinical competency and what expectations managers have of the new graduate nurse in regards to clinical competency. The themes are <em>applying metacognitive judgment, getting the big picture, providing safe care,</em> and <em>developing professional nursing behaviors</em>. This study presents Transitions Theory as a theoretical framework to support its findings, as student nurses transition to the role of the new graduate nurse in the acute care setting.<em> </em>The application of the four themes described in this study to Transitions Theory assists in further understanding the meaning of clinical competency in nursing.</p> <p><strong>Conclusion:</strong></p> <p>Implications of this study from the perspective of nursing science and research offered for the first time a shared view of the concept of clinical competency from the perception of the managers in practice and the faculty educating undergraduate nursing students in the clinical area. Implications for nursing education included providing faculty a means to structure the clinical experience so that students may be better prepared to practice in the acute care setting as a new graduate nurse. In nursing practice, the benefits for the managers are an understanding of the level of clinical competency and preparation of the new graduate nurse, which enables them to further support their transition to clinical practice. Future research may include a tool for the objective measurement of clinical competency.</p>en
dc.subjectClinical Competencyen
dc.subjectInterpretive Description Qualitative Researchen
dc.subjectNursing Educationen
dc.date.available2017-07-17T13:58:55Z-
dc.date.issued2017-07-17-
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-17T13:58:55Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.name28th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.conference.locationDublin, Irelanden
dc.descriptionEvent Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarshipen
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