Reactive Depression's Relationship to Rehospitalization in Heart Failure Patients

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/621871
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Poster
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
Reactive Depression's Relationship to Rehospitalization in Heart Failure Patients
Author(s):
Walters, Mary Renee
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Delta
Author Details:
Mary Renee Walters, PhD, RN, CCRN, FNP-BC, Professional Experience: NURSE MANAGER CARDIOVASCULAR LAB FEBRUARY 2012- JUNE 2016 Operational responsibility, performance management and budgetary responsibility for 8 Cardiovascular Develop strategic initiatives to achieve short and long term goals. Oversee charging and billing compliance. VENUE FIRST AID MARCH 2001- JUNE 2016 NURSE MANAGER CARDIOVASCULAR PROGRESSIVE CARE & CARDIOVASCULAR MANAGEMENT JULY, 2006 – February, 2012 Operational responsibility, performance management and budgetary responsibility for 32 bed Cardiology/Medical Progressive Care Nursing Unit that was recognized by AACN as a Beacon Center for Excellence, Central Monitoring Unit, Chest Pain Center, White Heart Learning Center, and Heart Failure Program. The unit is part of the Center for Advanced Heart Care that has been recognized by Thomson Reuters 50 Top Cardiovascular and ranked by U.S. News & World Report. UNIT COORDINATOR/STAFF RN July 1999, 2001 – APRIL, 2006 Perform coordination of care from admission to discharge for a group of patients, specifically including cardiovascular patient populations. Author Summary: Dr. Walters is a dedicated advanced practice nurse, certified in both critical care and family practice. She has spent the last 10 years serving in leadership positions promoting quality patient care in the acute care setting. Dr. Walters also serves as an adjunct professor at The University of Kansas and Boise State University.
Abstract:

Purpose: To explore the effect of reactive depression on all-cause rehospitalization and all-cause mortality in NYHA Class III and IV patients during the 12 month following an index hospitalization for HF exacerbation. The study aims were: (a) describe the effect of depression, (b) explain the variance of depression, and (c) determine the moderator effect of depression on patient preparedness to manage complex HF home care all-cause rehospitalization and/or all-cause mortality in HF patients.

Methods:  A Secondary Data Analysis of data obtained from a longitudinal study. Descriptive statistics, logistic regression, and multiple linear regression analyses with and with/out interaction effects were performed to address the study purpose and aims. Wagner's Chronic Care Model provided the theoretical framework that guided the study. Instruments included in this study: demographic sheet, the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D), and the Dartmouth Primary Care Cooperative Information Project Chart System (measure social support), Income Adequacy rating scale, Preparedness for HF Home Care, and a medical record review for determining the comorbidities index score.

Results: Logistic regression, multiple regression, and moderator analysis were conducted to address the research questions. These analyses demonstrated that depression consistently has a significant relationship to rehospitalization. Depression as measured by CES-D score greater or equal than 16 has a significant relationship with all-cause rehospitalization p=.09 and all-cause rehospitalization and mortality p=.09. In this study, depression did not demonstrate a relationship with mortality alone. In addition, depression did not have an interaction effect between preparedness and all-cause rehospitalization and/or mortality.

Conclusion: A significant relationship was identified between depression and all cause readmission. The relationship between depression and the composite variable (all cause readmission and mortality) was also significant due to all cause readmission alone. This further supports the strength of the relationship between depression and rehospitalization. Screening for depression should be part of heart failure management. Management of depression may decrease rehospitalization in HF patients.

Keywords:
Heart Failure; Outcomes and Rehospitalization; Mortality
Repository Posting Date:
17-Jul-2017
Date of Publication:
17-Jul-2017
Other Identifiers:
INRC17PST448
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
28th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Dublin, Ireland
Description:
Event Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarship

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePosteren
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.titleReactive Depression's Relationship to Rehospitalization in Heart Failure Patientsen_US
dc.contributor.authorWalters, Mary Reneeen
dc.contributor.departmentDeltaen
dc.author.detailsMary Renee Walters, PhD, RN, CCRN, FNP-BC, Professional Experience: NURSE MANAGER CARDIOVASCULAR LAB FEBRUARY 2012- JUNE 2016 Operational responsibility, performance management and budgetary responsibility for 8 Cardiovascular Develop strategic initiatives to achieve short and long term goals. Oversee charging and billing compliance. VENUE FIRST AID MARCH 2001- JUNE 2016 NURSE MANAGER CARDIOVASCULAR PROGRESSIVE CARE & CARDIOVASCULAR MANAGEMENT JULY, 2006 – February, 2012 Operational responsibility, performance management and budgetary responsibility for 32 bed Cardiology/Medical Progressive Care Nursing Unit that was recognized by AACN as a Beacon Center for Excellence, Central Monitoring Unit, Chest Pain Center, White Heart Learning Center, and Heart Failure Program. The unit is part of the Center for Advanced Heart Care that has been recognized by Thomson Reuters 50 Top Cardiovascular and ranked by U.S. News & World Report. UNIT COORDINATOR/STAFF RN July 1999, 2001 – APRIL, 2006 Perform coordination of care from admission to discharge for a group of patients, specifically including cardiovascular patient populations. Author Summary: Dr. Walters is a dedicated advanced practice nurse, certified in both critical care and family practice. She has spent the last 10 years serving in leadership positions promoting quality patient care in the acute care setting. Dr. Walters also serves as an adjunct professor at The University of Kansas and Boise State University.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/621871-
dc.description.abstract<p><strong>Purpose: </strong><span>To explore the effect of reactive depression on all-cause rehospitalization and all-cause mortality in NYHA Class III and IV patients during the 12 month following an index hospitalization for HF exacerbation. The study aims were: (a) describe the effect of depression, (b) explain the variance of depression, and (c) determine the moderator effect of depression on patient preparedness to manage complex HF home care all-cause rehospitalization and/or all-cause mortality in HF patients.</span></p> <p><strong>Methods: </strong> A Secondary Data Analysis of data obtained from a longitudinal study. Descriptive statistics, logistic regression, and multiple linear regression analyses with and with/out interaction effects were performed to address the study purpose and aims. Wagner's Chronic Care Model provided the theoretical framework that guided the study. Instruments included in this study: demographic sheet, the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D), and the Dartmouth Primary Care Cooperative Information Project Chart System (measure social support), Income Adequacy rating scale, Preparedness for HF Home Care, and a medical record review for determining the comorbidities index score.</p> <p><strong>Results: </strong>Logistic regression, multiple regression, and moderator analysis were conducted to address the research questions. These analyses demonstrated that depression consistently has a significant relationship to rehospitalization. Depression as measured by CES-D score greater or equal than 16 has a significant relationship with all-cause rehospitalization p=.09 and all-cause rehospitalization and mortality p=.09. In this study, depression did not demonstrate a relationship with mortality alone. In addition, depression did not have an interaction effect between preparedness and all-cause rehospitalization and/or mortality.</p> <p><strong>Conclusion: </strong>A significant relationship was identified between depression and all cause readmission. The relationship between depression and the composite variable (all cause readmission and mortality) was also significant due to all cause readmission alone. This further supports the strength of the relationship between depression and rehospitalization. Screening for depression should be part of heart failure management. Management of depression may decrease rehospitalization in HF patients.</p>en
dc.subjectHeart Failureen
dc.subjectOutcomes and Rehospitalizationen
dc.subjectMortalityen
dc.date.available2017-07-17T15:58:00Z-
dc.date.issued2017-07-17-
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-17T15:58:00Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.name28th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.conference.locationDublin, Irelanden
dc.descriptionEvent Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarshipen
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