Urinary Incontinence in the Nursing Home Resident: Exploring CNA Caregivers' Attitudes and Beliefs Regarding UI

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/621879
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
Urinary Incontinence in the Nursing Home Resident: Exploring CNA Caregivers' Attitudes and Beliefs Regarding UI
Other Titles:
Preventing Injury and Infection in Resident Care
Author(s):
Auletto, Roxellen Anntoinette
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Xi
Author Details:
Roxellen Anntoinette Auletto, DNP, RN, MSN, MLA, ANP-BC, PNP, Professional Experience: Roxellen A. Auletto, APRN is certified by ANCC as an Adult and Pediatric Nurse Practitioner and licensed to practice as an APN in NJ, PA, CA and MA. She also holds current RN licenses in WA. She is a member of state nursing associations in the states where she holds licensure and a member of Sigma Theta Tau. She joined the United States Air Force Reserve after 9/11 in 2002 serving as a Flight Nurse and Critical Care Air Transport Team nurse flying aeromedical evacuation missions into the desert. She recently completed a Flight Surgeon program at the School of Aerospace Medicine at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base and holds the rank of Lt Col serving as a military provider in the USAF Air National Guard at the 144th Fighter Wing Medical Group in, Fresno, CA. Author Summary: Roxellen Auletto completed her undergraduate education at Cooper Medical Center, Camden (Diploma '75). She then attended Simmons College(MSN ’98; DNP ‘14), University of Pennsylvania(MLA ’02), Stockton University(MSN ’09). Entering the USAF after 9/11, she served as Flight Nurse/ Critical Care Air Transport, flying aeromedical missions into the Middle East. In 2016, she completed Flight Surgeon School of Aerospace Medicine, Wright-Patterson AFB. She continues her military career as a Lt Col, provider, CA Air National Guard.
Abstract:

Purpose: The primary objective of this qualitative study was to elicit the attitudes and beliefs of CNA’s towards UI in a long term care facility. A greater understanding of how CNA’s view UI in this patient population can then position both nursing and CNA’s to effectively identify, prevent, and coordinate plan of care for the reversal of UI.

Methods: Focus group methodology was utilized to answer the research question, “what are the attitudes and beliefs about urinary incontinence among a sample of CNA’s working in a long- term care facility?” Data collection was in the form of semi-structured focus group interviews. Interviews were audio taped and transcribed verbatim. The group facilitator served as note taker capturing observations of the group during the interviews, noting body language, facial expressions and group interactions. The researcher served as the moderator, focusing on group dialogue, dynamics, and participation utilizing the semi-structured interview questions as prompts to facilitate and maintain CNAs engagement in the focus group.

Results: Five themes emerged from the data. 1) "We're stretched too thin"; 2) “No one asks our opinions, but we are the ones who know what’s going on"; 3) "Incontinence: It's just what happens when you get old"; 4) "Some of them do this out of spite,” and 5) "Preventing incontinence: It’s everyone's job.” Although research exists examining differences in attitude and understanding regarding UI among registered nurses, licensed practical nurses, and certified nursing assistants working in skilled nursing homes before and after study interventions, studies focusing solely on CNAs could not be found.

Conclusion: Although the five themes identified during the study may not seem novel or surprising, they represent the feelings of a growing body of healthcare providers whose voices can no longer be ignored. CNAs role in long term care will continue to require more responsibility, education, and leadership. It is unrealistic to think that their involvement can be limited to caregiving alone. If we are to address the issues of understaffing, feelings of unimportance in their role as CNAs, and lack of understanding as to why the elderly become incontinent, active engagement of the primary caregivers is essential.

Keywords:
nursing home resident; certified nursing assistants; urinary incontinence
Repository Posting Date:
17-Jul-2017
Date of Publication:
17-Jul-2017
Other Identifiers:
INRC17P12
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
28th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Dublin, Ireland
Description:
Event Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarship

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.titleUrinary Incontinence in the Nursing Home Resident: Exploring CNA Caregivers' Attitudes and Beliefs Regarding UIen_US
dc.title.alternativePreventing Injury and Infection in Resident Careen
dc.contributor.authorAuletto, Roxellen Anntoinetteen
dc.contributor.departmentXien
dc.author.detailsRoxellen Anntoinette Auletto, DNP, RN, MSN, MLA, ANP-BC, PNP, Professional Experience: Roxellen A. Auletto, APRN is certified by ANCC as an Adult and Pediatric Nurse Practitioner and licensed to practice as an APN in NJ, PA, CA and MA. She also holds current RN licenses in WA. She is a member of state nursing associations in the states where she holds licensure and a member of Sigma Theta Tau. She joined the United States Air Force Reserve after 9/11 in 2002 serving as a Flight Nurse and Critical Care Air Transport Team nurse flying aeromedical evacuation missions into the desert. She recently completed a Flight Surgeon program at the School of Aerospace Medicine at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base and holds the rank of Lt Col serving as a military provider in the USAF Air National Guard at the 144th Fighter Wing Medical Group in, Fresno, CA. Author Summary: Roxellen Auletto completed her undergraduate education at Cooper Medical Center, Camden (Diploma '75). She then attended Simmons College(MSN ’98; DNP ‘14), University of Pennsylvania(MLA ’02), Stockton University(MSN ’09). Entering the USAF after 9/11, she served as Flight Nurse/ Critical Care Air Transport, flying aeromedical missions into the Middle East. In 2016, she completed Flight Surgeon School of Aerospace Medicine, Wright-Patterson AFB. She continues her military career as a Lt Col, provider, CA Air National Guard.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/621879-
dc.description.abstract<p><strong>Purpose: </strong><span>The primary objective of this qualitative study was to elicit the attitudes and beliefs of CNA’s towards UI in a long term care facility. A greater understanding of how CNA’s view UI in this patient population can then position both nursing and CNA’s to effectively identify, prevent, and coordinate plan of care for the reversal of UI.</span></p> <p><strong>Methods: </strong>Focus group methodology was utilized to answer the research question, “what are the attitudes and beliefs about urinary incontinence among a sample of CNA’s working in a long- term care facility?” Data collection was in the form of semi-structured focus group interviews. Interviews were audio taped and transcribed verbatim. The group facilitator served as note taker capturing observations of the group during the interviews, noting body language, facial expressions and group interactions. The researcher served as the moderator, focusing on group dialogue, dynamics, and participation utilizing the semi-structured interview questions as prompts to facilitate and maintain CNAs engagement in the focus group.</p> <p><strong>Results: </strong>Five themes emerged from the data. 1) "We're stretched too thin"; 2) “No one asks our opinions, but we are the ones who know what’s going on"; 3) "Incontinence: It's just what happens when you get old"; 4) "Some of them do this out of spite,” and 5) "Preventing incontinence: It’s everyone's job.” Although research exists examining differences in attitude and understanding regarding UI among registered nurses, licensed practical nurses, and certified nursing assistants working in skilled nursing homes before and after study interventions, studies focusing solely on CNAs could not be found.</p> <p><strong>Conclusion: </strong>Although the five themes identified during the study may not seem novel or surprising, they represent the feelings of a growing body of healthcare providers whose voices can no longer be ignored. CNAs role in long term care will continue to require more responsibility, education, and leadership. It is unrealistic to think that their involvement can be limited to caregiving alone. If we are to address the issues of understaffing, feelings of unimportance in their role as CNAs, and lack of understanding as to why the elderly become incontinent, active engagement of the primary caregivers is essential.</p>en
dc.subjectnursing home residenten
dc.subjectcertified nursing assistantsen
dc.subjecturinary incontinenceen
dc.date.available2017-07-17T17:56:31Z-
dc.date.issued2017-07-17-
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-17T17:56:31Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.name28th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.conference.locationDublin, Irelanden
dc.descriptionEvent Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarshipen
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.