2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/621883
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Poster
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
Predictors of Readiness for Disaster Management Skills Among Hospital Nurses
Author(s):
Lin, Chia-Huei
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Theta Tau
Author Details:
Chia-Huei Lin, PhD, RN, Professional Experience: 2000-2005 -- RN, Tri-Service General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan. 2005-2008 -- Assistant Head Nurse, Department of Nursing, Tri-Service General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan. 2008-present -- Head Nurse, Department of Nursing, Tri-Service General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan. 2003-present--clinical instructor of medical and surgical nursing, Department of Nursing, Tri-Service General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan. Four awards for clinical research and clinical practice related. Author 26 publications primarily relating to exercise and chronic disease (such as diabetes, metabolic syndrome, heart failure). two times of presentations at scientific meetings. Author Summary: Dr. Chia-Huei Lin, is an Assistant professor of School of Nursing, National Defense Medical Center; Supervisor, Tri-Service General Hospital, Taiwan. Board Member of Taipei Nurses Association, Taiwan. Dr. Chia-Huei Lin's researches focus on the metabolic risks and exercise training, health promotion and women’s health.
Abstract:

Purpose: Continuous disasters have been threatening people’s lives in recent years. However, studies regarding the readiness for disaster management competency among nurses remain limited. Therefore, this study investigated the predictors of readiness for disaster management competency among nurses.

Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted. Stratified random sampling was used to recruit eligible cases from 1,197 nurses, who had been registered nurses for at least 3 months in a military medical centre from northern Taiwan. In addition, all male nurses and military nurses were recruited. Data were collected on readiness for disaster management competency using a 40-item, reliable, well-valid, and self-administered questionnaire with four domains (preparedness competence, self-protection, emergency response, and clinical nursing skill). Linear regression models were applied to explore the predictors of readiness for disaster management skills among nurses.

Results: Among the recruited 365 registered nurses who were 32.6 years of age (SD = 8.04), there was an average 12.6 years of work in nursing. The majority (75.9%) had a Bachelor’s degree or higher in nursing. Eighty percent (n = 292) were civilian nurses without military ranks. Thirty-four percent worked in critical care units or an emergency room. Some participants (n = 14, 19.5%) had previously received disaster-related training; 3.8% had previous disaster nursing experience and 13.4% had been deployed for disaster assistance. When adjusting for potential confounding factors the length of nursing work and previously received disaster training are significantly associated with preparedness competency and self-protection competency, respectively. Length of nursing work (< .001), educational level (= .02), working unit (< .001), and previously received disaster-related training (p = .01) were associated with emergency response competency and clinical nursing skill competency, respectively. Regarding overall disaster management competency, participants with longer length of nursing work (< .001), with a higher educational level (Bachelor’s degree and above) (= .03), working at critical care units or an emergency room (p=.02), and having previously received disaster training (p<.001), were associated better disaster nursing competency.

Conclusion: Our study indicates that disaster-related training is recommended to be included in continuous nursing education, and preparing nurses to become critical care nurses helps to improve their own readiness for disaster management competency.

Keywords:
disaster; disaster management skill; nursing competence
Repository Posting Date:
17-Jul-2017
Date of Publication:
17-Jul-2017
Other Identifiers:
INRC17PST124
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
28th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Dublin, Ireland
Description:
Event Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarship

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePosteren
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.titlePredictors of Readiness for Disaster Management Skills Among Hospital Nursesen_US
dc.contributor.authorLin, Chia-Hueien
dc.contributor.departmentTheta Tauen
dc.author.detailsChia-Huei Lin, PhD, RN, Professional Experience: 2000-2005 -- RN, Tri-Service General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan. 2005-2008 -- Assistant Head Nurse, Department of Nursing, Tri-Service General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan. 2008-present -- Head Nurse, Department of Nursing, Tri-Service General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan. 2003-present--clinical instructor of medical and surgical nursing, Department of Nursing, Tri-Service General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan. Four awards for clinical research and clinical practice related. Author 26 publications primarily relating to exercise and chronic disease (such as diabetes, metabolic syndrome, heart failure). two times of presentations at scientific meetings. Author Summary: Dr. Chia-Huei Lin, is an Assistant professor of School of Nursing, National Defense Medical Center; Supervisor, Tri-Service General Hospital, Taiwan. Board Member of Taipei Nurses Association, Taiwan. Dr. Chia-Huei Lin's researches focus on the metabolic risks and exercise training, health promotion and women’s health.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/621883-
dc.description.abstract<p><strong>Purpose: </strong><span>Continuous disasters have been threatening people’s lives in recent years. However, studies regarding the readiness for disaster management competency among nurses remain limited. Therefore, this study investigated the predictors of readiness for disaster management competency among nurses.</span></p> <p><strong>Methods: </strong>A cross-sectional study was conducted. Stratified random sampling was used to recruit eligible cases from 1,197 nurses, who had been registered nurses for at least 3 months in a military medical centre from northern Taiwan. In addition, all male nurses and military nurses were recruited. Data were collected on readiness for disaster management competency using a 40-item, reliable, well-valid, and self-administered questionnaire with four domains (preparedness competence, self-protection, emergency response, and clinical nursing skill). Linear regression models were applied to explore the predictors of readiness for disaster management skills among nurses.</p> <p><strong>Results: </strong>Among the recruited 365 registered nurses who were 32.6 years of age (SD = 8.04), there was an average 12.6 years of work in nursing. The majority (75.9%) had a Bachelor’s degree or higher in nursing. Eighty percent (<em>n</em> = 292) were civilian nurses without military ranks. Thirty-four percent worked in critical care units or an emergency room. Some participants (<em>n</em> = 14, 19.5%) had previously received disaster-related training; 3.8% had previous disaster nursing experience and 13.4% had been deployed for disaster assistance. When adjusting for potential confounding factors the length of nursing work and previously received disaster training are significantly associated with preparedness competency and self-protection competency, respectively. Length of nursing work (<em>p </em>< .001), educational level (<em>p </em>= .02), working unit (<em>p </em>< .001), and previously received disaster-related training (<em>p</em> = .01) were associated with emergency response competency and clinical nursing skill competency, respectively. Regarding overall disaster management competency, participants with longer length of nursing work (<em>p </em>< .001), with a higher educational level (Bachelor’s degree and above) (<em>p </em>= .03), working at critical care units or an emergency room (p=.02), and having previously received disaster training (p<.001), were associated better disaster nursing competency.</p> <p><strong>Conclusion: </strong>Our study indicates that disaster-related training is recommended to be included in continuous nursing education, and preparing nurses to become critical care nurses helps to improve their own readiness for disaster management competency.</p>en
dc.subjectdisasteren
dc.subjectdisaster management skillen
dc.subjectnursing competenceen
dc.date.available2017-07-17T19:18:22Z-
dc.date.issued2017-07-17-
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-17T19:18:22Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.name28th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.conference.locationDublin, Irelanden
dc.descriptionEvent Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarshipen
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.