Working Together to Treat Tobacco Dependence Among Smokers With Serious Mental Illness

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/621894
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
Working Together to Treat Tobacco Dependence Among Smokers With Serious Mental Illness
Other Titles:
Improving Health in the Psychiatric Patient
Author(s):
Schwindt, Rhonda; Hudmon, Karen; Lay, Kathy; McNelis, Angela; Agley, Jon
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Alpha
Author Details:
Rhonda Schwindt, DNP, RN, PMHNP-BC, Professional Experience: I am an Assistant Professor and Coordinator of the Psychiatric/Mental Nurse Practitioner program at Indiana University School of Nursing. My primary research focus is tobacco use and dependence among persons with behavioral health disorders. I have been actively involved in tobacco-cessation related education and research on a national, state, and local level. My activities include: (1) development, evaluation, and dissemination of an interprofessional tobacco cessation training program for persons with behavioral health disorders; (2) development of an online training module to teach health professionals motivational interviewing; and (3) development of a motivational messaging program to promote tobacco cessation among pregnant women who smoke. Author Summary: Rhonda Schwindt is an Assistant Professor and Coordinator of the Psychiatric/Mental Health Nurse Practitioner program at Indiana University School of Nursing and a nationally certified Psychiatric/Mental Health Nurse Practitioner. Her primary research focus is tobacco use and dependence among persons with behavioral health disorders.
Abstract:

Purpose: The prevalence of tobacco use among persons with mental illness exceeds the prevalence in the general population by a factor of 2 to 4. Despite strong evidence that tobacco cessation counseling by a health professional can approximately double patients’ odds of quitting, clinicians across disciplines are reluctant to offer these individuals effective means by which to quit smoking. The purpose of this pilot study was to estimate the impact of an interprofessional tobacco education program on the perceived self-efficacy and self-rated counseling abilities of graduate health professions students to provide tobacco cessation counseling and their perceptions of interprofessional collaborative practice.

Methods:  Investigators used a 1-group, pre/post-test design with quantitative and qualitative analysis. All health professions students (N=36 [n=13 nursing, n=9 pharmacy, and n=14 social work]) completed pre-test-post-test surveys, 5 hours of tobacco education training consisting of a 2-hour online module and a 3-hour interprofessional live training session, a simulation experience with a standardized patient, and a post-simulation debriefing session. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, correlations, paired t-tests, and qualitative analysis techniques. ResultsParticipants’ perceived self-efficacy (t=-9.92, df = 35, p<0.001), self-rated counseling abilities (t=-7.36, df = 35, p<0.001), intention to ask about tobacco (t=-3.16, df = 35, p=0.003), and to provide counseling for tobacco cessation (t=-4.35, df = 35, p<0.001) were significantly improved at post-test. In addition, all participants reported high perceived ability to engage in collaborative care and work as part of an interprofessional team. Emergent themes from qualitative analyses of open-field queries were valuing simulations, demystifying disciplines, reflecting on and building skills, critiquing practice, and lessons learned.

Results: Participants’ perceived self-efficacy (t=-9.92, df = 35, p<0.001), self-rated counseling abilities (t=-7.36, df = 35, p<0.001), intention to ask about tobacco (t=-3.16, df = 35, p=0.003), and to provide counseling for tobacco cessation (t=-4.35, df = 35, p<0.001) were significantly improved at post-test. In addition, all participants reported high perceived ability to engage in collaborative care and work as part of an interprofessional team. Emergent themes from qualitative analyses of open-field queries were valuing simulations, demystifying disciplines, reflecting on and building skills, critiquing practice, and lessons learned.

Conclusion: Teaching health professions students an interprofessional collaborative approach to treating tobacco dependence for persons with serious mental illness appears to be an effective approach to improve perceived self-efficacy and self-rated counseling abilities and to positively impact their perceptions of interprofessional collaborative practice. These findings have the potential to inform the ways in which students across the spectrum of health professions are educated to provide tobacco cessation counseling. Larger studies are recommended to validate results of this pilot study.

Keywords:
tobacco dependence treatment; interprofessional education; practice; mental illness
Repository Posting Date:
18-Jul-2017
Date of Publication:
18-Jul-2017
Other Identifiers:
INRC17M09
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
28th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Dublin, Ireland
Description:
Event Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarship

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.titleWorking Together to Treat Tobacco Dependence Among Smokers With Serious Mental Illnessen_US
dc.title.alternativeImproving Health in the Psychiatric Patienten
dc.contributor.authorSchwindt, Rhondaen
dc.contributor.authorHudmon, Karenen
dc.contributor.authorLay, Kathyen
dc.contributor.authorMcNelis, Angelaen
dc.contributor.authorAgley, Jonen
dc.contributor.departmentAlphaen
dc.author.detailsRhonda Schwindt, DNP, RN, PMHNP-BC, Professional Experience: I am an Assistant Professor and Coordinator of the Psychiatric/Mental Nurse Practitioner program at Indiana University School of Nursing. My primary research focus is tobacco use and dependence among persons with behavioral health disorders. I have been actively involved in tobacco-cessation related education and research on a national, state, and local level. My activities include: (1) development, evaluation, and dissemination of an interprofessional tobacco cessation training program for persons with behavioral health disorders; (2) development of an online training module to teach health professionals motivational interviewing; and (3) development of a motivational messaging program to promote tobacco cessation among pregnant women who smoke. Author Summary: Rhonda Schwindt is an Assistant Professor and Coordinator of the Psychiatric/Mental Health Nurse Practitioner program at Indiana University School of Nursing and a nationally certified Psychiatric/Mental Health Nurse Practitioner. Her primary research focus is tobacco use and dependence among persons with behavioral health disorders.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/621894-
dc.description.abstract<p><strong>Purpose: </strong><span>The prevalence of tobacco use among persons with mental illness exceeds the prevalence in the general population by a factor of 2 to 4. Despite strong evidence that tobacco cessation counseling by a health professional can approximately double patients’ odds of quitting, clinicians across disciplines are reluctant to offer these individuals effective means by which to quit smoking. The purpose of this pilot study was to estimate the impact of an interprofessional tobacco education program on the perceived self-efficacy and self-rated counseling abilities of graduate health professions students to provide tobacco cessation counseling and their perceptions of interprofessional collaborative practice.</span></p> <p><strong>Methods: </strong> Investigators used a 1-group, pre/post-test design with quantitative and qualitative analysis. All health professions students (<em>N</em>=36 [<em>n=</em>13 nursing, <em>n</em>=9 pharmacy, and <em>n=</em>14 social work]) completed pre-test-post-test surveys, 5 hours of tobacco education training consisting of a 2-hour online module and a 3-hour interprofessional live training session, a simulation experience with a standardized patient, and a post-simulation debriefing session. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, correlations, paired <em>t</em>-tests, and qualitative analysis techniques. <strong><strong>Results</strong>: </strong>Participants’ perceived self-efficacy (<em>t</em>=-9.92, df = 35, p<0.001), self-rated counseling abilities <em>(t</em>=-7.36, df = 35, p<0.001), intention to ask about tobacco (<em>t</em>=-3.16, df = 35, p=0.003), and to provide counseling for tobacco cessation (<em>t</em>=-4.35, df = 35, p<0.001) were significantly improved at post-test. In addition, all participants reported high perceived ability to engage in collaborative care and work as part of an interprofessional team. Emergent themes from qualitative analyses of open-field queries were valuing simulations, demystifying disciplines, reflecting on and building skills, critiquing practice, and lessons learned.</p> <p>Results: Participants’ perceived self-efficacy (<em>t</em>=-9.92, df = 35, p<0.001), self-rated counseling abilities <em>(t</em>=-7.36, df = 35, p<0.001), intention to ask about tobacco (<em>t</em>=-3.16, df = 35, p=0.003), and to provide counseling for tobacco cessation (<em>t</em>=-4.35, df = 35, p<0.001) were significantly improved at post-test. In addition, all participants reported high perceived ability to engage in collaborative care and work as part of an interprofessional team. Emergent themes from qualitative analyses of open-field queries were valuing simulations, demystifying disciplines, reflecting on and building skills, critiquing practice, and lessons learned.</p> <p><strong>Conclusion: </strong>Teaching health professions students an interprofessional collaborative approach to treating tobacco dependence for persons with serious mental illness appears to be an effective approach to improve perceived self-efficacy and self-rated counseling abilities and to positively impact their perceptions of interprofessional collaborative practice. These findings have the potential to inform the ways in which students across the spectrum of health professions are educated to provide tobacco cessation counseling. Larger studies are recommended to validate results of this pilot study.</p>en
dc.subjecttobacco dependence treatmenten
dc.subjectinterprofessional educationen
dc.subjectpracticeen
dc.subjectmental illnessen
dc.date.available2017-07-18T13:23:20Z-
dc.date.issued2017-07-18-
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-18T13:23:20Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.name28th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.conference.locationDublin, Irelanden
dc.descriptionEvent Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarshipen
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