Longitudinal Evaluation of a Prenatal Mentoring Program for Decreasing Maternal Anxiety in a Military Sample

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/621899
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
Longitudinal Evaluation of a Prenatal Mentoring Program for Decreasing Maternal Anxiety in a Military Sample
Other Titles:
Perinatal Health
Author(s):
Weis, Karen L.; Lederman, Regina P.; Walker, Katherine C.; Chan, Wenyaw
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Delta Alpha-at-Large
Author Details:
Karen L. Weis, PhD, RNC-OB, FAAN, Professional Experience: 20 yrs of continuous research and funding in prenatal maternal anxiety and birth outcomes research. 30 years of experience in high- and low-risk obstetrics, leading maternal-child inpatient and outpatient departments. Author Summary: Dr. Weis is Professor and Endowed Chair of Nursing at the University of the Incarnate Word. She has been the primary investigator for over $3.5M in funded research and has published primarily in the field of prenatal maternal psychosocial health. She co-authored the third edition of Psychosocial Adaptation to Pregnancy and more recently Perinatal Mental Health and the Military Family: Identifying and Treating Mood and Anxiety Disorders.
Abstract:

Purpose: A relationship exists between prenatal maternal anxiety to pregnancy complications, poor birth outcomes and infant/childhood cognitive delays.1-3 Traditionally, high-risk groups of young, unmarried, undereducated primigravidas have been the focus of prenatal assessment and interventions.4 Less understood is anxiety in differing samples. The aim of this project was to assess the efficacy of the Mentors Offering Maternal Support (M-O-M-STM) program for decreasing prenatal maternal anxiety in a military sample.

Methods:  Two hundred and forty-six military women were consented and randomized to either the M-O-M-STM intervention or prenatal care without M-O-M-S.TMThe PSEQ-SF, EPDS, RSES and BRIEF were administered in each trimester. Women in the intervention attended 8, 1-hr mentored sessions aimed at decreasing prenatal pregnancy-specific anxiety and depression. The efficacy of the intervention across pregnancy was examined for prenatal anxiety, self-esteem, depression and resilience using linear mixed models with autoregressive correlation. Demographic covariates were: age, employment, parity, marital status, education, deployment history, military branch, race, and active duty status.

Results:  M-O-M-S™ participants had significantly greater decreases in prenatal anxiety related to Identification with a Motherhood Role (= .049) and Preparation for Labor (= .017). Nulliparous women had significantly lower anxiety related to Acceptance of Pregnancy (β = 1.32; se = 0.56) but five times the anxiety for Preparation of Labor (β = -5.01; se = 0.51). Women with deployed husbands had significantly greater anxiety for Identification of a Motherhood Role (β = 1.04; se = 0.50). All participants had significantly greater increases in resilience (β = 0.04; se = 0.02). There were no significant findings for depression.

Conclusion: The findings reflected significant decreases in prenatal anxiety for women who received the M-O-M-STMprogram. The impact of the father’s absence on a women’s identification as a mother is extremely important. Military leaders recognize that the well-being of the military family is integral to the morale and readiness of service members.The findings provide evidence of the effectiveness of a mentored support program for decreasing pregnancy-specific prenatal anxiety predictive of preterm birth and low birthweight in military women. The findings also highlight the need for appropriate assessments and interventions for differing populations.

Keywords:
military; prenatal anxiety; prenatal intervention
Repository Posting Date:
18-Jul-2017
Date of Publication:
18-Jul-2017
Other Identifiers:
INRC17L14
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
28th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Dublin, Ireland
Description:
Event Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarship

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.titleLongitudinal Evaluation of a Prenatal Mentoring Program for Decreasing Maternal Anxiety in a Military Sampleen_US
dc.title.alternativePerinatal Healthen
dc.contributor.authorWeis, Karen L.en
dc.contributor.authorLederman, Regina P.en
dc.contributor.authorWalker, Katherine C.en
dc.contributor.authorChan, Wenyawen
dc.contributor.departmentDelta Alpha-at-Largeen
dc.author.detailsKaren L. Weis, PhD, RNC-OB, FAAN, Professional Experience: 20 yrs of continuous research and funding in prenatal maternal anxiety and birth outcomes research. 30 years of experience in high- and low-risk obstetrics, leading maternal-child inpatient and outpatient departments. Author Summary: Dr. Weis is Professor and Endowed Chair of Nursing at the University of the Incarnate Word. She has been the primary investigator for over $3.5M in funded research and has published primarily in the field of prenatal maternal psychosocial health. She co-authored the third edition of Psychosocial Adaptation to Pregnancy and more recently Perinatal Mental Health and the Military Family: Identifying and Treating Mood and Anxiety Disorders.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/621899-
dc.description.abstract<p><strong>Purpose: </strong><span>A relationship exists between prenatal maternal anxiety to pregnancy complications, poor birth outcomes and infant/childhood cognitive delays.</span><sup>1-3</sup><span> Traditionally, high-risk groups of young, unmarried, undereducated primigravidas have been the focus of prenatal assessment and interventions.</span><sup>4</sup><span> Less understood is anxiety in differing samples. The aim of this project was to assess the efficacy of the Mentors Offering Maternal Support (M-O-M-S</span><sup>TM</sup><span>) program for decreasing prenatal maternal anxiety in a military sample.</span></p> <p><strong>Methods: </strong> Two hundred and forty-six military women were consented and randomized to either the M-O-M-S<sup>TM </sup>intervention or prenatal care without M-O-M-S.<sup>TM</sup>The PSEQ-SF, EPDS, RSES and BRIEF were administered in each trimester. Women in the intervention attended 8, 1-hr mentored sessions aimed at decreasing prenatal pregnancy-specific anxiety and depression. The efficacy of the intervention across pregnancy was examined for prenatal anxiety, self-esteem, depression and resilience using linear mixed models with autoregressive correlation. Demographic covariates were: age, employment, parity, marital status, education, deployment history, military branch, race, and active duty status.</p> <p><strong>Results: </strong> M-O-M-S™ participants had significantly greater decreases in prenatal anxiety related to <em>Identification with a Motherhood Role</em> (<em>p </em>= .049) and <em>Preparation for Labor</em> (<em>p </em>= .017). Nulliparous women had significantly lower anxiety related to <em>Acceptance of Pregnancy</em> (<em>β </em>= 1.32; <em>se </em>= 0.56) but five times the anxiety for <em>Preparation of Labor</em> (<em>β </em>= -5.01; <em>se </em>= 0.51). Women with deployed husbands had significantly greater anxiety for <em>Identification of a Motherhood Role</em> (<em>β </em>= 1.04; <em>se </em>= 0.50). All participants had significantly greater increases in resilience (<em>β </em>= 0.04; <em>se </em>= 0.02). There were no significant findings for depression.</p> <p><strong>Conclusion: </strong>The findings reflected significant decreases in prenatal anxiety for women who received the M-O-M-S<sup>TM</sup>program. The impact of the father’s absence on a women’s identification as a mother is extremely important. Military leaders recognize that the well-being of the military family is integral to the morale and readiness of service members.<sup>5 </sup>The findings provide evidence of the effectiveness of a mentored support program for decreasing pregnancy-specific prenatal anxiety predictive of preterm birth and low birthweight in military women.<sup> </sup>The findings also highlight the need for appropriate assessments and interventions for differing populations.</p>en
dc.subjectmilitaryen
dc.subjectprenatal anxietyen
dc.subjectprenatal interventionen
dc.date.available2017-07-18T14:32:49Z-
dc.date.issued2017-07-18-
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-18T14:32:49Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.name28th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.conference.locationDublin, Irelanden
dc.descriptionEvent Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarshipen
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