Substance Use Experiences of HIV-Positive and HIV-Negative Young Black Men Who Have Sex With Men

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/621906
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
Substance Use Experiences of HIV-Positive and HIV-Negative Young Black Men Who Have Sex With Men
Other Titles:
Male Sexual Health and Substance Abuse
Author(s):
Nation, Austin
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Alpha Eta
Author Details:
Austin Nation, PhD, MSN, RN, PHN, Professional Experience: Austin Nation, PhD, RN, PHN is a graduate of the University of California, San Francisco – School of Nursing, Community Health Systems. He has been a nurse for over 30 years and is currently an Assistant Professor at California State University (CSU), Fullerton. His research interest is with understanding substance use and HIV among young Black men who have sex with men (MSM), funded by the Substance Abuse Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA)/ American Nurses Association (ANA) Minority Fellowship Program. Dr. Nation was also a fellow in the Black AIDS Institute’s African American HIV University – Science and Treatment College. He has been doing HIV prevention education for over 15 years, working with a number of community-based and AIDS service organizations. organizations. Author Summary: Dr. Austin Nation is a graduate of the University of California, San Francisco – School of Nursing, Community Health Systems. He has been a nurse for over 35 years and is currently an Assistant Professor at California State University (CSU), Fullerton. His research interest is with understanding substance use and HIV among young Black men who have sex with men (MSM). He has been doing HIV prevention education for over 15 years.
Abstract:

Purpose:  

The prevalence of HIV among young Black men who have sex with men (MSM) is three to four times higher than white MSM. Young black MSM are run-aways and homeless, forcing them to survive on the streets by becoming sex workers, engaging in unprotected anal intercourse because either they or their partner is under the influence of drugs or alcohol. Previous studies cite crack cocaine use, sex while high on crack cocaine, marijuana and alcohol, or sharing needles for injection drugs as strongly associated with HIV infection among young black MSM. The purpose of this presentation is to understand the substance use experiences of HIV-positive and HIV-negative young Black MSM.

Methods:  

This narrative qualitative study, obtained from participant interviews, offers insights about the range of factors and enhance our understanding about the role that substance use plays in the lives of HIV-positive and HIV-negative young Black MSM.

Results:  

The themes that emerged from the coding of this qualitative narrative study describe an across-case experiential trajectory with a summary of the significant experiences of this population. This information contributes to the limited body of knowledge currently available and will assist with the development of prevention education strategies specifically tailored to this population that address issues surrounding substance abuse in HIV transmission.

The narratives describe experiences with substance use related to the following:

(1) early substance use exposure and initiation in family - Young Black MSM are exposed to substance use in their family, with family members who are also using drugs.

(2) for coping with gay sex and being gay – Participants how substance use allowed them the freedom to explore gay sex and their sexuality, including how they bottom (be the receptive anal partner) when under the influence of drugs.

(3) peer pressure in new community to fit in with others - Participants describes meeting new people through social media and how substance use is a part of that experience

(4) exposure to lots of methamphetamine in San Francisco – Participants describe the prevalence of methamphetamine in the dominant gay community, in this case White gay men, who are often times use the drug to control young Black MSM.

(5) to numb feelings- Participants discover the benefits of methamphetamine for numbing, masking feelings and coping,

(6) sexual enhancement and survival sex – Participants discover the sexual enhancement benefit and this leads them to engage in high risk behaviors, often times as a way to obtain food, clothing and shelter.

Here is a summary of the four key findings related to the overall research aims of this study that emerged from the narrative stories of the young Black MSM:

1) “There was a lot going on in the homes of these participants.” Almost all of the young Black MSM discussed early substance use exposure in their family, including parents who were also drugs. The young men shared about broken family structures, including abuse and neglect. These social and environment factors contribute directly to their own early substance use initiation (median age 15), as well as early sex initial (median age 15), at times with parents providing the drugs. Mean age for participants is 26.

2) Over thirty years into the AIDS epidemic, stigma and homophobia continue to be an issue for these young Black MSM. Most of the participants were either kicked out of their family homes, asked to leave by their family, or wanted to get away from their family so that they could be themselves. This is blatant discrimination. Most came to San Francisco as a safe place, only to face homelessness and having to figure out how to survive on their own. This creates a sense of insecurity.

3) With the prevalence and exposure to methamphetamine in the San Francisco, young Black MSM discover the benefits of this drug for numbing, masking, and coping with everything from being gay, gay sex, dealing with peer pressure, and for sexual enhancement and survival sex. These issues act as drivers for methamphetamine use as an ineffective coping mechanism.

4) Almost all the young Black MSM had some knowledge and awareness about HIV prior to arriving in San Francisco; most were testing regularly every three months. Once under the influence of methamphetamine, the participants don’t care about condoms, nor do they have the ability to negotiate condom usage with their partners. There is a sense of anticipation, resignation and acceptance about acquiring HIV; HIV risk reduction apathy.

Conclusion:  

Clinicians and researchers in all academic and practice settings will encounter HIV-positive and HIV-negative young Black men and need to understand the prevalence of substance use among this population. It is also important to take a thorough family history, social history, as well as sexual health and risk behavior assessment.

Keywords:
Black and African Americans; Men Who Have Sex With Men (MSM); Substance Use
Repository Posting Date:
18-Jul-2017
Date of Publication:
18-Jul-2017
Other Identifiers:
INRC17M10
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
28th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Dublin, Ireland
Description:
Event Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarship

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.titleSubstance Use Experiences of HIV-Positive and HIV-Negative Young Black Men Who Have Sex With Menen_US
dc.title.alternativeMale Sexual Health and Substance Abuseen
dc.contributor.authorNation, Austinen
dc.contributor.departmentAlpha Etaen
dc.author.detailsAustin Nation, PhD, MSN, RN, PHN, Professional Experience: Austin Nation, PhD, RN, PHN is a graduate of the University of California, San Francisco – School of Nursing, Community Health Systems. He has been a nurse for over 30 years and is currently an Assistant Professor at California State University (CSU), Fullerton. His research interest is with understanding substance use and HIV among young Black men who have sex with men (MSM), funded by the Substance Abuse Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA)/ American Nurses Association (ANA) Minority Fellowship Program. Dr. Nation was also a fellow in the Black AIDS Institute’s African American HIV University – Science and Treatment College. He has been doing HIV prevention education for over 15 years, working with a number of community-based and AIDS service organizations. organizations. Author Summary: Dr. Austin Nation is a graduate of the University of California, San Francisco – School of Nursing, Community Health Systems. He has been a nurse for over 35 years and is currently an Assistant Professor at California State University (CSU), Fullerton. His research interest is with understanding substance use and HIV among young Black men who have sex with men (MSM). He has been doing HIV prevention education for over 15 years.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/621906-
dc.description.abstract<p><strong><strong>Purpose: </strong> </strong></p> <p><strong></strong>The prevalence of HIV among young Black men who have sex with men (MSM) is three to four times higher than white MSM. Young black MSM are run-aways and homeless, forcing them to survive on the streets by becoming sex workers, engaging in unprotected anal intercourse because either they or their partner is under the influence of drugs or alcohol. Previous studies cite crack cocaine use, sex while high on crack cocaine, marijuana and alcohol, or sharing needles for injection drugs as strongly associated with HIV infection among young black MSM. The purpose of this presentation is to understand the substance use experiences of HIV-positive and HIV-negative young Black MSM.</p> <p><strong><strong>Methods: </strong> </strong></p> <p><strong></strong>This narrative qualitative study, obtained from participant interviews, offers insights about the range of factors and enhance our understanding about the role that substance use plays in the lives of HIV-positive and HIV-negative young Black MSM.</p> <p><strong><strong>Results: </strong> </strong></p> <p><strong></strong>The themes that emerged from the coding of this qualitative narrative study describe an across-case experiential trajectory with a summary of the significant experiences of this population. This information contributes to the limited body of knowledge currently available and will assist with the development of prevention education strategies specifically tailored to this population that address issues surrounding substance abuse in HIV transmission.</p> <p>The narratives describe experiences with substance use related to the following:</p> <p>(1) early substance use exposure and initiation in family - Young Black MSM are exposed to substance use in their family, with family members who are also using drugs.</p> <p>(2) for coping with gay sex and being gay – Participants how substance use allowed them the freedom to explore gay sex and their sexuality, including how they bottom (be the receptive anal partner) when under the influence of drugs.</p> <p>(3) peer pressure in new community to fit in with others - Participants describes meeting new people through social media and how substance use is a part of that experience</p> <p>(4) exposure to lots of methamphetamine in San Francisco – Participants describe the prevalence of methamphetamine in the dominant gay community, in this case White gay men, who are often times use the drug to control young Black MSM.</p> <p>(5) to numb feelings- Participants discover the benefits of methamphetamine for numbing, masking feelings and coping,</p> <p>(6) sexual enhancement and survival sex – Participants discover the <em>sexual enhancement</em> benefit and this leads them to engage in high risk behaviors, often times as a way to obtain food, clothing and shelter.</p> <p>Here is a summary of the four key findings related to the overall research aims of this study that emerged from the narrative stories of the young Black MSM:<strong></strong></p> <p>1) “There was a lot going on in the homes of these participants.” Almost all of the young Black MSM discussed early substance use exposure in their family, including parents who were also drugs. The young men shared about broken family structures, including abuse and neglect. These social and environment factors contribute directly to their own early substance use initiation (median age 15), as well as early sex initial (median age 15), at times with parents providing the drugs. Mean age for participants is 26.</p> <p>2) Over thirty years into the AIDS epidemic, stigma and homophobia continue to be an issue for these young Black MSM. Most of the participants were either kicked out of their family homes, asked to leave by their family, or wanted to get away from their family so that they could be themselves. This is blatant discrimination. Most came to San Francisco as a safe place, only to face homelessness and having to figure out how to survive on their own. This creates a sense of insecurity.</p> <p>3) With the prevalence and exposure to methamphetamine in the San Francisco, young Black MSM discover the benefits of this drug for numbing, masking, and coping with everything from being gay, gay sex, dealing with peer pressure, and for sexual enhancement and survival sex. These issues act as drivers for methamphetamine use as an ineffective coping mechanism.</p> <p>4) Almost all the young Black MSM had some knowledge and awareness about HIV prior to arriving in San Francisco; most were testing regularly every three months. Once under the influence of methamphetamine, the participants don’t care about condoms, nor do they have the ability to negotiate condom usage with their partners. There is a sense of anticipation, resignation and acceptance about acquiring HIV; HIV risk reduction apathy.</p> <p><strong><strong>Conclusion: </strong> </strong></p> <p><strong></strong>Clinicians and researchers in all academic and practice settings will encounter HIV-positive and HIV-negative young Black men and need to understand the prevalence of substance use among this population. It is also important to take a thorough family history, social history, as well as sexual health and risk behavior assessment.</p>en
dc.subjectBlack and African Americansen
dc.subjectMen Who Have Sex With Men (MSM)en
dc.subjectSubstance Useen
dc.date.available2017-07-18T17:57:00Z-
dc.date.issued2017-07-18-
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-18T17:57:00Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.name28th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.conference.locationDublin, Irelanden
dc.descriptionEvent Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarshipen
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