The Impact of Burnout on Doctorate Nursing Faculty’s Intent to Leave Their Academic Position

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/621919
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
The Impact of Burnout on Doctorate Nursing Faculty’s Intent to Leave Their Academic Position
Other Titles:
Stress and Burnout in the Nursing Profession
Author(s):
Lee, Young-Me; Florez, Elizabeth; Spawn, Nadia; Bishop-Royse, Jessica
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Zeta Sigma
Author Details:
Young-Me Lee, PhD, RN, Professional Experience: I have been working in the nursing department of DePaul University since 2003 as an assistant professor. The research area that I have focused on is Sexually Transmitted Infection Prevention Project for Hispanic and African American Young adults living in the community. The goals of the community based intervention project are to enhance overall health of young adults and reduce health disparities among minority populations. Author Summary: Dr. Young-Me Lee is an Associate Professor at the DePaul University School of Nursing. She has a strong background in community-based research on stress and coping among Korean-American immigrants, health disparities in economically and educationally disadvantaged Chicago communities, and preventive health behaviors on sexually transmitted infections and Human Papillomavirus. She is also interested in nursing education/nursing curriculum to enhance recruitment and retention of minority nursing students.
Abstract:

Purpose: The demands placed on nursing educators puts them at high risk for burnout, leading to decreased job satisfaction and increased intent to leave their faculty positions. Despite the fact that nursing faculty are at great risk for job burnout; there are limited studies exploring the relationship between burnout and leaving their academic positions. The aim of this study is to address the national nursing faculty shortage by examining demographics, predictors including teaching preparation, and burnout to determine intent to leave nursing academia among PhD and DNP-prepared nursing faculty.

Methods: A descriptive survey research design was used to examine the relationships among the key study variables and identify the most significant factors related to faculty leaving. A national survey of doctorate faculty teaching in undergraduate and/or graduate nursing programs throughout the U.S. was administered via Qualtrics survey software. Logistical regression models were used to interpret data significance.

Results: A total of 146 nursing faculty responded to the online survey. 51.4% of the respondents (n=75) had a DNP degree and 48.6% (n=71) had a PhD degree. 61% of the respondents were over the age of 50 with the remaining 39% of the respondents between ages 20 and 49. PhD-prepared faculty reported higher emotional exhaustion compared to DNP-prepared faculty. Findings revealed that degree type (PhD versus DNP), age, and emotional exhaustion and depersonalization in burnout were significant predictors related to intent to leave nursing academia. Results indicated that younger faculty, PhD-prepared faculty, and higher reported levels of emotional exhaustion significantly determined intent to leave their positions. Depersonalization, conversely, was found to significantly decrease intent to leave.

Conclusion: The findings from this study found that PhD-prepared nursing faculty experienced more emotional exhaustion compared to the DNP-prepared faculty, a significant factor influencing decisions to leave nursing academia. To address the nursing faculty shortage issue, it is critical to create supportive and positive working environments to promote the well-being of both nursing faculty members and the institutions in which they work.

Keywords:
burnout; faculty; retention
Repository Posting Date:
18-Jul-2017
Date of Publication:
18-Jul-2017
Other Identifiers:
INRC17B11
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
28th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Dublin, Ireland
Description:
Event Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarship

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.titleThe Impact of Burnout on Doctorate Nursing Faculty’s Intent to Leave Their Academic Positionen_US
dc.title.alternativeStress and Burnout in the Nursing Professionen
dc.contributor.authorLee, Young-Meen
dc.contributor.authorFlorez, Elizabethen
dc.contributor.authorSpawn, Nadiaen
dc.contributor.authorBishop-Royse, Jessicaen
dc.contributor.departmentZeta Sigmaen
dc.author.detailsYoung-Me Lee, PhD, RN, Professional Experience: I have been working in the nursing department of DePaul University since 2003 as an assistant professor. The research area that I have focused on is Sexually Transmitted Infection Prevention Project for Hispanic and African American Young adults living in the community. The goals of the community based intervention project are to enhance overall health of young adults and reduce health disparities among minority populations. Author Summary: Dr. Young-Me Lee is an Associate Professor at the DePaul University School of Nursing. She has a strong background in community-based research on stress and coping among Korean-American immigrants, health disparities in economically and educationally disadvantaged Chicago communities, and preventive health behaviors on sexually transmitted infections and Human Papillomavirus. She is also interested in nursing education/nursing curriculum to enhance recruitment and retention of minority nursing students.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/621919-
dc.description.abstract<p><strong>Purpose: </strong><span>The demands placed on nursing educators puts them at high risk for burnout, leading to decreased job satisfaction and increased intent to leave their faculty positions. Despite the fact that nursing faculty are at great risk for job burnout; there are limited studies exploring the relationship between burnout and leaving their academic positions. The aim of this study is to address the national nursing faculty shortage by examining demographics, predictors including teaching preparation, and burnout to determine intent to leave nursing academia among PhD and DNP-prepared nursing faculty.</span></p> <p><strong>Methods: </strong>A descriptive survey research design was used to examine the relationships among the key study variables and identify the most significant factors related to faculty leaving. A national survey of doctorate faculty teaching in undergraduate and/or graduate nursing programs throughout the U.S. was administered via Qualtrics survey software. Logistical regression models were used to interpret data significance.</p> <p><strong>Results: </strong>A total of 146 nursing faculty responded to the online survey. 51.4% of the respondents (n=75) had a DNP degree and 48.6% (n=71) had a PhD degree. 61% of the respondents were over the age of 50 with the remaining 39% of the respondents between ages 20 and 49. PhD-prepared faculty reported higher emotional exhaustion compared to DNP-prepared faculty. Findings revealed that degree type (PhD versus DNP), age, and emotional exhaustion and depersonalization in burnout were significant predictors related to intent to leave nursing academia. Results indicated that younger faculty, PhD-prepared faculty, and higher reported levels of emotional exhaustion significantly determined intent to leave their positions. Depersonalization, conversely, was found to significantly decrease intent to leave.</p> <p><strong>Conclusion: </strong>The findings from this study found that PhD-prepared nursing faculty experienced more emotional exhaustion compared to the DNP-prepared faculty, a significant factor influencing decisions to leave nursing academia. To address the nursing faculty shortage issue, it is critical to create supportive and positive working environments to promote the well-being of both nursing faculty members and the institutions in which they work.</p>en
dc.subjectburnouten
dc.subjectfacultyen
dc.subjectretentionen
dc.date.available2017-07-18T20:44:01Z-
dc.date.issued2017-07-18-
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-18T20:44:01Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.name28th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.conference.locationDublin, Irelanden
dc.descriptionEvent Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarshipen
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