The Association Between School-Related Victimization, Depressive Symptoms, and Suicidality Among U.S. High School Students

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/621920
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
The Association Between School-Related Victimization, Depressive Symptoms, and Suicidality Among U.S. High School Students
Other Titles:
Factors in Suicide
Author(s):
Pontes, Nancy; Ayres, Cynthia; Pontes, Manuel C. F.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Alpha Theta
Author Details:
Nancy Pontes, PhD, RN, FNP-BC, Professional Experience: Nancy Pontes is an Assistant Professor of Nursing at Rutgers University, Camden since fall, 2015. She received her PhD from Columbia University in 2003. Dr. Pontes has worked in a variety of university-based roles as a nurse practitioner, educator and administrator. Her practice has taken her to a broad range of settings to work with vulnerable populations in the United States and abroad. Most recently she received a Department of Education grant to enhance current international studies for nursing students in Guatemala and Bolivia, and develop a new program to Cuba in partnership with Spanish foreign language education. Her research focuses upon social determinants of health and well-being among youth and families. Author Summary: Nancy Pontes is an Assistant Professor at Rutgers University, School of Nursing-Camden. She has been family nurse practitioner for 25 years, working with vulnerable populations in a variety of settings. Through a recent Department of Education grant, she works with current international studies in Bolivia and Guatemala and is developing a program for Cuba. She is passionate about improving population health and studying the social determinants of health and well-being among youth and families.
Abstract:

Purpose:

Research has shown that victimization during adolescence is associated with numerous adverse health outcomes (Bauman, Toomey & Walker, 2013; Bowes, Johnson, Wolke & Lewis, 2016; Cole et al., 2014; Messias, Kindrick & Castro, 2014; and Sibold, Edwards, Close & Hudziak, 2015). The primary purpose of this research is to use data from the Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) to examine the relationships between two types of school-related victimization, 1) bullying and 2) threats or injuries with a weapon, and depressive symptoms and suicidality, including suicidal ideation and suicide attempts among US high school students.

Methods:

This research is a secondary analysis of YRBS data, which are collected biennially from a nationally representative 3-stage cluster sample design of US high school students. The binary (Yes/No) dependent variables for this study are depressive symptoms, suicidal ideation, and suicide attempts. The independent variables of primary interest are school-related bullying and threats or injuries with a weapon. Covariates are gender, race/ethnicity, survey year, and grade level. Four waves of YRBS data (2009, 2011, 2013, and 2015) were pooled for analyses. Data were analyzed using multivariate logistic regression with SPSS 24 Complex Samples™, which correctly incorporates the multi-stage sampling design and sampling weights and enables nationally-representative estimates with associated standard errors and confidence intervals. Analyses were performed for three samples, 1) all students, 2) male students, and 3) females students.

Results:

Among all students, there were significant relationships between school bullying victimization and depressive symptoms (OR=2.79, 95% CI=2.63-2.97), suicidal ideation (3.03, 95% CI=2.85-3.23), and suicide attempts (OR=2.86, 95% CI=2.57-3.18). Results also showed that there were significant relationships between school-related threats or injuries with a weapon and depressive symptoms (OR=2.57, 95% CI=2.34-2.83), suicidal ideation (2.80, 95% CI=2.51-3.12), and suicide attempts (OR=4.76, 95% CI=4.14-5.48). The association between weapon related victimization and suicide attempts was more positive (OR=4.76) than the association between bullying victimization and suicide attempts (OR=2.80). Separate analyses by gender showed that the relationship between weapon-related victimization and suicidal ideation was significantly greater among male students (OR=3.10, 95% CI=2.71-3.55) than among female students (OR=2.46, 95% CI=2.11-2.87). Results also showed that the relationship between weapon-related victimization and suicide attempts was significantly greater among male students (OR=6.45, 95% CI=5.29-7.85) than among female students (OR=3.56, 95% CI=3.01-4.21).

There were also significant effects of race/ethnicity and depressive symptoms and suicidality. Notably Hispanic students were significantly more likely than non-Hispanic White students to report depressive symptoms, suicidal ideation, and suicide attempts. All minority student groups were significantly more likely to attempt suicide than non-Hispanic White students.

Conclusion:

School-related bullying victimization and threats or injuries with a weapon have very large effects on depressive symptoms and suicidality among US high school students. Future efforts are imperative using evidence-based interventions to prevent all forms of bullying and weapon-related victimization and reduce the health-harming effects of school-related victimization.

Keywords:
Adolescence; Suicide; Victimization
Repository Posting Date:
18-Jul-2017
Date of Publication:
18-Jul-2017
Other Identifiers:
INRC17C07
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
28th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Dublin, Ireland
Description:
Event Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarship

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.titleThe Association Between School-Related Victimization, Depressive Symptoms, and Suicidality Among U.S. High School Studentsen_US
dc.title.alternativeFactors in Suicideen
dc.contributor.authorPontes, Nancyen
dc.contributor.authorAyres, Cynthiaen
dc.contributor.authorPontes, Manuel C. F.en
dc.contributor.departmentAlpha Thetaen
dc.author.detailsNancy Pontes, PhD, RN, FNP-BC, Professional Experience: Nancy Pontes is an Assistant Professor of Nursing at Rutgers University, Camden since fall, 2015. She received her PhD from Columbia University in 2003. Dr. Pontes has worked in a variety of university-based roles as a nurse practitioner, educator and administrator. Her practice has taken her to a broad range of settings to work with vulnerable populations in the United States and abroad. Most recently she received a Department of Education grant to enhance current international studies for nursing students in Guatemala and Bolivia, and develop a new program to Cuba in partnership with Spanish foreign language education. Her research focuses upon social determinants of health and well-being among youth and families. Author Summary: Nancy Pontes is an Assistant Professor at Rutgers University, School of Nursing-Camden. She has been family nurse practitioner for 25 years, working with vulnerable populations in a variety of settings. Through a recent Department of Education grant, she works with current international studies in Bolivia and Guatemala and is developing a program for Cuba. She is passionate about improving population health and studying the social determinants of health and well-being among youth and families.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/621920-
dc.description.abstract<p><strong>Purpose:</strong></p> <p>Research has shown that victimization during adolescence is associated with numerous adverse health outcomes (Bauman, Toomey & Walker, 2013; Bowes, Johnson, Wolke & Lewis, 2016; Cole et al., 2014; Messias, Kindrick & Castro, 2014; and Sibold, Edwards, Close & Hudziak, 2015). The primary purpose of this research is to use data from the Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) to examine the relationships between two types of school-related victimization, 1) bullying and 2) threats or injuries with a weapon, and depressive symptoms and suicidality, including suicidal ideation and suicide attempts among US high school students.</p> <p><strong>Methods:</strong></p> <p>This research is a secondary analysis of YRBS data, which are collected biennially from a nationally representative 3-stage cluster sample design of US high school students. The binary (Yes/No) dependent variables for this study are depressive symptoms, suicidal ideation, and suicide attempts. The independent variables of primary interest are school-related bullying and threats or injuries with a weapon. Covariates are gender, race/ethnicity, survey year, and grade level. Four waves of YRBS data (2009, 2011, 2013, and 2015) were pooled for analyses. Data were analyzed using multivariate logistic regression with SPSS 24 Complex Samples™, which correctly incorporates the multi-stage sampling design and sampling weights and enables nationally-representative estimates with associated standard errors and confidence intervals. Analyses were performed for three samples, 1) all students, 2) male students, and 3) females students.</p> <p><strong>Results:</strong></p> <p>Among all students, there were significant relationships between school bullying victimization and depressive symptoms (OR=2.79, 95% CI=2.63-2.97), suicidal ideation (3.03, 95% CI=2.85-3.23), and suicide attempts (OR=2.86, 95% CI=2.57-3.18). Results also showed that there were significant relationships between school-related threats or injuries with a weapon and depressive symptoms (OR=2.57, 95% CI=2.34-2.83), suicidal ideation (2.80, 95% CI=2.51-3.12), and suicide attempts (OR=4.76, 95% CI=4.14-5.48). The association between weapon related victimization and suicide attempts was more positive (OR=4.76) than the association between bullying victimization and suicide attempts (OR=2.80). Separate analyses by gender showed that the relationship between weapon-related victimization and suicidal ideation was significantly greater among male students (OR=3.10, 95% CI=2.71-3.55) than among female students (OR=2.46, 95% CI=2.11-2.87). Results also showed that the relationship between weapon-related victimization and suicide attempts was significantly greater among male students (OR=6.45, 95% CI=5.29-7.85) than among female students (OR=3.56, 95% CI=3.01-4.21).</p> <p>There were also significant effects of race/ethnicity and depressive symptoms and suicidality. Notably Hispanic students were significantly more likely than non-Hispanic White students to report depressive symptoms, suicidal ideation, and suicide attempts. All minority student groups were significantly more likely to attempt suicide than non-Hispanic White students.</p> <p><strong>Conclusion:</strong></p> <p>School-related bullying victimization and threats or injuries with a weapon have very large effects on depressive symptoms and suicidality among US high school students. Future efforts are imperative using evidence-based interventions to prevent all forms of bullying and weapon-related victimization and reduce the health-harming effects of school-related victimization.</p>en
dc.subjectAdolescenceen
dc.subjectSuicideen
dc.subjectVictimizationen
dc.date.available2017-07-18T20:52:00Z-
dc.date.issued2017-07-18-
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-18T20:52:00Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.name28th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.conference.locationDublin, Irelanden
dc.descriptionEvent Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarshipen
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