Nurses Crossing Disciplines and Borders: A Participatory Research Approach to Global Water Challenges

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/621925
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
Nurses Crossing Disciplines and Borders: A Participatory Research Approach to Global Water Challenges
Other Titles:
Global Interprofessional Health Disparities
Author(s):
Simpson, Vicki L.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Delta Omicron
Author Details:
Vicki L. Simpson, PhD, MSN, RN, CHES, Professional Experience: 2016-present Assistant Professor, Purdue University School of Nursing 2007-2016 Director of Undergraduate Education, Clinical Assistant Professor, Purdue University School of Nursing, West Lafayette, IN 1983-2007 Community Coordinator, Nursing Faculty, St. Elizabeth School of Nursing, Lafayette, IN 1981-1983 Visiting Nurse, Visiting Nurse Home Health Services, Lafayette, IN 1979-1981 Psychiatric Charge Nurse, Wabash Valley Mental Health Center, West Lafayette, IN Responsible for curriculum design, support and evaluation for the past 15 to 20 years in BSN nursing curriculums. Author/Co-Author of 7 peer-reviewed publications related to public health nursing education, nursing education and worksite health. Author/Co-Author of 15 presentations/poster sessions at state, national and international conferences. Certified as a Community Health Education Specialist. Author Summary: I am an Assistant Professor at Purdue University School of Nursing where I teach public health nursing. My research focuses on health promotion and disease prevention at the both the individual and population level across a variety of settings(local to global). Using health risk appraisals and lifestyle behavior surveys, I study determinants and factors which impact an individual's ability to be healthy to inform development of strategies which support healthy lifestyle behaviors.
Abstract:

Purpose: The purpose of this presentation is to: 1) describe an ongoing project to provide access to safe water and improved sanitation and hygiene for rural, underserved areas of the Dominican Republic, and 2) delineate the contributions/roles of nurses as part of a cross-disciplinary team in addressing complex global challenges. According to the United Nations (UN), 1.8 billion people globally use water contaminated by fecal matter while 2.4 billion lack access to basic sanitation services. Additionally, issues related to unsafe water, poor sanitation and hygiene are major contributors to death for children under the age of five worldwide. Ensuring access to water and sanitation for all is sixth on the list of the UN Sustainable Development Goals. Achieving this goal will not only reduce morbidity and mortality, but also help to improve nutrition, address poverty, inequalities, and disparities, and enhance school and work attendance and performance (United Nations-Water, 2016; World Health Organization [WHO], 2016). Global health challenges such as these are complex and require effective global health partnerships including nurses. To address these challenges, education for health professionals should support development of global health competencies including a focus on interprofessional collaboration and cross discipline problem solving (Opollo, Bond, Gray, Lail-Davis, 2012; Jogerst et al., 2015). Professional nursing organizations including Sigma Theta Tau International (STTI) and the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) encourage nurses to work towards the UN Sustainable Development Goals through collaboration, identification of key goals, and the building of bidirectional reciprocal relationships to create ongoing sustainable efforts (Dalmida et al., 2016; Interprofessional Education Collaborative Expert Panel, 2011). Providing opportunities for nursing students to apply their skills and knowledge to meet global needs can support development of leadership skills, increase commitment to global health, and enhance the ability to provide culturally relevant care (Jogerst et al., 2015). This presentation will describe strategies and activities which have been used to sustain this initiative since 2012, including the impact on students, faculty and communities in the Dominican Republic, and plans for expansion.

Methods: An initiative began in 2012 using a cross disciplinary, service-learning approach to provide holistic solutions for safe water access for an underserved, rural community in the Dominican Republic. Initial faculty and students (graduate and undergraduate) represented the disciplines of nursing, agricultural economics, civil engineering, environmental and ecological engineering, and biological and food sciences. The class began as faculty driven and led; over time the course has evolved to being fully student driven with faculty guidance and support. Classes early in the process provided background from all disciplines to support understanding of the issue from multiple perspectives, an overview of the participatory research approach to be used, and discussions of possible solutions to provide access to safe water in collaboration with the selected community. As the class enters its fifth year, the focus has broadened to encompass sanitation and hygiene in addition to access to safe water and work has begun with three other communities in the Dominican Republic. Additionally, other disciplines have joined the project. Class time is now focused upon supporting ongoing communication and collaboration with the communities in the Dominican Republic, discussion of cultural, political, economic, and health aspects of water, sanitation, and hygiene issues, development of potential solutions to meet the needs of the communities, and identification of strategies to evaluate impact. Communication with the community is frequent and supports true collaboration and shared responsibility for the design, implementation, and management of solutions to provide access to safe water and improve sanitation and hygiene. Such collaboration is vital to effective global health partnerships and sustainability.

Every year, two to three visits to the Dominican Republic are made by faculty and students to maintain presence and enhance community trust. Various activities occur during these visits including: 1) meetings with community members, representatives from local service organizations, political representatives, and local health providers, 2) data collection via household surveys, focus groups, and visits to local health clinics, and 3) assessment of local resources available to support system design and implementation.

Results: Since the projects inception, 60-70 students have been involved, including 16 undergraduate nursing students. In 2014, the first system was built at a primary school located in the center of a poor rural community outside of Santiago. Several events surrounded the ribbon cutting ceremony including training related to safe operation and use of the system as well as education efforts led by the nursing students including a water, sanitation, and hygiene curriculum for implementation at the local schools and in the community. Since 2014, trips to the Dominican Republic have included visits to three new communities, along with return visits to the initial community to provide continued support, guidance and adaptations as needed for the water system. The process has not been without challenges, however each challenge is tackled collaboratively by the faculty, students and communities who consistently strive to reach the identified goals. The participatory research approach has allowed community members to participate in research, project design and review of policies which impact the issues surrounding access to safe water. For students, the impact has been truly transformative on both personal and professional levels. Knowledge of the complementary skill sets other disciplines bring to projects such as these has been broadened. Skills related to formal presentations, grant writing, manuscript preparation, leadership, fundraising, collaboration, and communication with non-English speaking populations have been enhanced. Students have witnessed issues not commonly seen in the US such as lack of access to soap and clean water for handwashing or water to flush a toilet as well as the giving nature of the Dominican people. This has led to development of respect, humility, and appreciation for the Dominican people; behaviors which are reciprocated by the communities they work with. As a result of this experience, several students have chosen to work in the public health arena locally and globally while others have gone on to additional degree programs in public health.

Conclusions: This project has provided many benefits in addition to access to safe water for the commmunity. Nursing students as well as students from other disciplines have been able to develop global competencies and a respect for cultural diversity and the role it plays in providing care to populations. Nurse educators have a responsibility to prepare nurses to function competently in relation to global issues (Wilson et al., 2012); projects such as these provide support for the development of such skills and competencies. Students who have participated in this project are able to reflect upon their feelings of global connectedness and the ways in which this experience has influenced and enhanced their education as well as their choice of future careers. These experiences can support development of individuals who can help lead the charge to address global health challenges.

Keywords:
Global Health; Interdisciplinary; Nursing
Repository Posting Date:
19-Jul-2017
Date of Publication:
19-Jul-2017
Other Identifiers:
INRC17A08
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
28th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Dublin, Ireland
Description:
Event Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarship

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.titleNurses Crossing Disciplines and Borders: A Participatory Research Approach to Global Water Challengesen_US
dc.title.alternativeGlobal Interprofessional Health Disparitiesen
dc.contributor.authorSimpson, Vicki L.en
dc.contributor.departmentDelta Omicronen
dc.author.detailsVicki L. Simpson, PhD, MSN, RN, CHES, Professional Experience: 2016-present Assistant Professor, Purdue University School of Nursing 2007-2016 Director of Undergraduate Education, Clinical Assistant Professor, Purdue University School of Nursing, West Lafayette, IN 1983-2007 Community Coordinator, Nursing Faculty, St. Elizabeth School of Nursing, Lafayette, IN 1981-1983 Visiting Nurse, Visiting Nurse Home Health Services, Lafayette, IN 1979-1981 Psychiatric Charge Nurse, Wabash Valley Mental Health Center, West Lafayette, IN Responsible for curriculum design, support and evaluation for the past 15 to 20 years in BSN nursing curriculums. Author/Co-Author of 7 peer-reviewed publications related to public health nursing education, nursing education and worksite health. Author/Co-Author of 15 presentations/poster sessions at state, national and international conferences. Certified as a Community Health Education Specialist. Author Summary: I am an Assistant Professor at Purdue University School of Nursing where I teach public health nursing. My research focuses on health promotion and disease prevention at the both the individual and population level across a variety of settings(local to global). Using health risk appraisals and lifestyle behavior surveys, I study determinants and factors which impact an individual's ability to be healthy to inform development of strategies which support healthy lifestyle behaviors.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/621925-
dc.description.abstract<p><strong>Purpose: </strong><span>The purpose of this presentation is to: 1) describe an ongoing project to provide access to safe water and improved sanitation and hygiene for rural, underserved areas of the Dominican Republic, and 2) delineate the contributions/roles of nurses as part of a cross-disciplinary team in addressing complex global challenges. According to the United Nations (UN), 1.8 billion people globally use water contaminated by fecal matter while 2.4 billion lack access to basic sanitation services. Additionally, issues related to unsafe water, poor sanitation and hygiene are major contributors to death for children under the age of five worldwide. Ensuring access to water and sanitation for all is sixth on the list of the UN Sustainable Development Goals. Achieving this goal will not only reduce morbidity and mortality, but also help to improve nutrition, address poverty, inequalities, and disparities, and enhance school and work attendance and performance (United Nations-Water, 2016; World Health Organization [WHO], 2016). Global health challenges such as these are complex and require effective global health partnerships including nurses. To address these challenges, education for health professionals should support development of global health competencies including a focus on interprofessional collaboration and cross discipline problem solving (Opollo, Bond, Gray, Lail-Davis, 2012; Jogerst et al., 2015). Professional nursing organizations including Sigma Theta Tau International (STTI) and the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) encourage nurses to work towards the UN Sustainable Development Goals through collaboration, identification of key goals, and the building of bidirectional reciprocal relationships to create ongoing sustainable efforts (Dalmida et al., 2016; Interprofessional Education Collaborative Expert Panel, 2011). Providing opportunities for nursing students to apply their skills and knowledge to meet global needs can support development of leadership skills, increase commitment to global health, and enhance the ability to provide culturally relevant care (Jogerst et al., 2015). This presentation will describe strategies and activities which have been used to sustain this initiative since 2012, including the impact on students, faculty and communities in the Dominican Republic, and plans for expansion.</span></p> <p><strong>Methods: </strong>An initiative began in 2012 using a cross disciplinary, service-learning approach to provide holistic solutions for safe water access for an underserved, rural community in the Dominican Republic. Initial faculty and students (graduate and undergraduate) represented the disciplines of nursing, agricultural economics, civil engineering, environmental and ecological engineering, and biological and food sciences. The class began as faculty driven and led; over time the course has evolved to being fully student driven with faculty guidance and support. Classes early in the process provided background from all disciplines to support understanding of the issue from multiple perspectives, an overview of the participatory research approach to be used, and discussions of possible solutions to provide access to safe water in collaboration with the selected community. As the class enters its fifth year, the focus has broadened to encompass sanitation and hygiene in addition to access to safe water and work has begun with three other communities in the Dominican Republic. Additionally, other disciplines have joined the project. Class time is now focused upon supporting ongoing communication and collaboration with the communities in the Dominican Republic, discussion of cultural, political, economic, and health aspects of water, sanitation, and hygiene issues, development of potential solutions to meet the needs of the communities, and identification of strategies to evaluate impact. Communication with the community is frequent and supports true collaboration and shared responsibility for the design, implementation, and management of solutions to provide access to safe water and improve sanitation and hygiene. Such collaboration is vital to effective global health partnerships and sustainability.</p> <p>Every year, two to three visits to the Dominican Republic are made by faculty and students to maintain presence and enhance community trust. Various activities occur during these visits including: 1) meetings with community members, representatives from local service organizations, political representatives, and local health providers, 2) data collection via household surveys, focus groups, and visits to local health clinics, and 3) assessment of local resources available to support system design and implementation.</p> <p><strong>Results: </strong>Since the projects inception, 60-70 students have been involved, including 16 undergraduate nursing students. In 2014, the first system was built at a primary school located in the center of a poor rural community outside of Santiago. Several events surrounded the ribbon cutting ceremony including training related to safe operation and use of the system as well as education efforts led by the nursing students including a water, sanitation, and hygiene curriculum for implementation at the local schools and in the community. Since 2014, trips to the Dominican Republic have included visits to three new communities, along with return visits to the initial community to provide continued support, guidance and adaptations as needed for the water system. The process has not been without challenges, however each challenge is tackled collaboratively by the faculty, students and communities who consistently strive to reach the identified goals. The participatory research approach has allowed community members to participate in research, project design and review of policies which impact the issues surrounding access to safe water. For students, the impact has been truly transformative on both personal and professional levels. Knowledge of the complementary skill sets other disciplines bring to projects such as these has been broadened. Skills related to formal presentations, grant writing, manuscript preparation, leadership, fundraising, collaboration, and communication with non-English speaking populations have been enhanced. Students have witnessed issues not commonly seen in the US such as lack of access to soap and clean water for handwashing or water to flush a toilet as well as the giving nature of the Dominican people. This has led to development of respect, humility, and appreciation for the Dominican people; behaviors which are reciprocated by the communities they work with. As a result of this experience, several students have chosen to work in the public health arena locally and globally while others have gone on to additional degree programs in public health.</p> <p><strong>Conclusions: </strong>This project has provided many benefits in addition to access to safe water for the commmunity. Nursing students as well as students from other disciplines have been able to develop global competencies and a respect for cultural diversity and the role it plays in providing care to populations. Nurse educators have a responsibility to prepare nurses to function competently in relation to global issues (Wilson et al., 2012); projects such as these provide support for the development of such skills and competencies. Students who have participated in this project are able to reflect upon their feelings of global connectedness and the ways in which this experience has influenced and enhanced their education as well as their choice of future careers. These experiences can support development of individuals who can help lead the charge to address global health challenges.</p>en
dc.subjectGlobal Healthen
dc.subjectInterdisciplinaryen
dc.subjectNursingen
dc.date.available2017-07-19T14:26:52Z-
dc.date.issued2017-07-19-
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-19T14:26:52Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.name28th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.conference.locationDublin, Irelanden
dc.descriptionEvent Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarshipen
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