Focus on Fidelity: Delivering What's Intended in a Multi-Site Randomized Clinical Trial

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/621928
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Poster
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
Focus on Fidelity: Delivering What's Intended in a Multi-Site Randomized Clinical Trial
Author(s):
Morrison, Janet D.; Stuifbergen, Alexa
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Epsilon Theta
Author Details:
Janet D. Morrison, PhD, RN, MSCN, Professional Experience: 1997 to present - Research Associate (NIH grant #s: R01 NR03195, R01HD035047, R21 NR011076, R01 NR014362, R01 NR007770-05) – University of Texas at Austin, School of Nursing, Austin, Texas. 2001 to 2009 - Research Associate, The University of Texas at Austin, Texas Center for Disability Studies, Austin, Texas. 1996 to 1997 - Research Associate, Sharp HealthCare, San Diego, California. 1987 to 1996 - Clinical Nurse, Cardiac Operating Room, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland. Author Summary: Dr. Morrison completed her PhD in Nursing in December 2016 at The University of Texas at Austin. She was awarded a Ruth L. Kirschstein Individual National Research Service Award (5F31NR014601) from the National Institute of Nursing Research at NIH. She has been a research associate on multiple NIH-funded research grants awarded to her mentor, Dr. Alexa Stuifbergen, Ph.D., RN, FAAN, since 1997.
Abstract:

Purpose: Intervention fidelity, the degree to which an intervention study is carried out as proposed, is critical to ensuring internal validity, reliability and generalizability of research findings (Gearing et al., 2011; Goense, Boendermaker, & von Yperen, 2016). Unfortunately, intervention fidelity is infrequently reported in the research literature (Corely & Kim, 2016; Stone 2015). The absence of intervention fidelity reporting may contribute to dissemination of potentially low-efficacy or ineffective interventions into clinical practice. The purpose of this abstract is to explicate the strategies used to assess and monitor intervention fidelity in an ongoing multi-site clinical trial. The intervention fidelity strategies used in the current study were guided by best practice recommendations put forth by the Treatment Fidelity Workgroup of the National Institutes of Health Behavior Change Consortium (BCC) (Bellg et al., 2004). The BCC’s recommendations encompass five strategy domains: (1) study design, (2) facilitator training, (3) intervention delivery, (4) intervention receipt, and (5) intervention enactment.

Methods: Strategies promoting intervention fidelity were developed a priori for use in a multi-site randomized clinical trial testing the efficacy of a computer-assisted cognitive rehabilitation intervention for adults with multiple sclerosis. Data were collected continuously throughout the study to assess and monitor intervention fidelity related to study design, facilitator training, intervention delivery, and intervention enactment.

Results: Fidelity data from 10 cohorts were gathered throughout the study’s 8-week long intervention and again at 2 and 4-months after the intervention ended. Data were extracted from audio-recordings of intervention sessions, session attendance records, audits of computer exercises completed at home by the participants, and post-intervention goal attainment scaling that suggested reasonably high fidelity to the intervention protocol.

Conclusion: This research project demonstrates how nurse researchers may examine and report intervention fidelity guided by best-practice recommendations. Detailed attention to, and documentation of, intervention fidelity strategies may serve to promote scientific rigor in future studies and foster translation of effective interventions into nursing practice.

Keywords:
evidence-based practice; reproducibility of results; research design
Repository Posting Date:
19-Jul-2017
Date of Publication:
19-Jul-2017
Other Identifiers:
INRC17PST646
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
28th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Dublin, Ireland
Description:
Event Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarship

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePosteren
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.titleFocus on Fidelity: Delivering What's Intended in a Multi-Site Randomized Clinical Trialen_US
dc.contributor.authorMorrison, Janet D.en
dc.contributor.authorStuifbergen, Alexaen
dc.contributor.departmentEpsilon Thetaen
dc.author.detailsJanet D. Morrison, PhD, RN, MSCN, Professional Experience: 1997 to present - Research Associate (NIH grant #s: R01 NR03195, R01HD035047, R21 NR011076, R01 NR014362, R01 NR007770-05) – University of Texas at Austin, School of Nursing, Austin, Texas. 2001 to 2009 - Research Associate, The University of Texas at Austin, Texas Center for Disability Studies, Austin, Texas. 1996 to 1997 - Research Associate, Sharp HealthCare, San Diego, California. 1987 to 1996 - Clinical Nurse, Cardiac Operating Room, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland. Author Summary: Dr. Morrison completed her PhD in Nursing in December 2016 at The University of Texas at Austin. She was awarded a Ruth L. Kirschstein Individual National Research Service Award (5F31NR014601) from the National Institute of Nursing Research at NIH. She has been a research associate on multiple NIH-funded research grants awarded to her mentor, Dr. Alexa Stuifbergen, Ph.D., RN, FAAN, since 1997.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/621928-
dc.description.abstract<p><strong>Purpose: </strong><span>Intervention fidelity, the degree to which an intervention study is carried out as proposed, is critical to ensuring internal validity, reliability and generalizability of research findings (Gearing et al., 2011; Goense, Boendermaker, & von Yperen, 2016). Unfortunately, intervention fidelity is infrequently reported in the research literature (Corely & Kim, 2016; Stone 2015). The absence of intervention fidelity reporting may contribute to dissemination of potentially low-efficacy or ineffective interventions into clinical practice. The purpose of this abstract is to explicate the strategies used to assess and monitor intervention fidelity in an ongoing multi-site clinical trial. The intervention fidelity strategies used in the current study were guided by best practice recommendations put forth by the Treatment Fidelity Workgroup of the National Institutes of Health Behavior Change Consortium (BCC) (Bellg et al., 2004). The BCC’s recommendations encompass five strategy domains: (1) study design, (2) facilitator training, (3) intervention delivery, (4) intervention receipt, and (5) intervention enactment.</span></p> <p><strong>Methods: </strong>Strategies promoting intervention fidelity were developed a priori for use in a multi-site randomized clinical trial testing the efficacy of a computer-assisted cognitive rehabilitation intervention for adults with multiple sclerosis. Data were collected continuously throughout the study to assess and monitor intervention fidelity related to study design, facilitator training, intervention delivery, and intervention enactment.</p> <p><strong>Results: </strong>Fidelity data from 10 cohorts were gathered throughout the study’s 8-week long intervention and again at 2 and 4-months after the intervention ended. Data were extracted from audio-recordings of intervention sessions, session attendance records, audits of computer exercises completed at home by the participants, and post-intervention goal attainment scaling that suggested reasonably high fidelity to the intervention protocol.</p> <p><strong>Conclusion: </strong>This research project demonstrates how nurse researchers may examine and report intervention fidelity guided by best-practice recommendations. Detailed attention to, and documentation of, intervention fidelity strategies may serve to promote scientific rigor in future studies and foster translation of effective interventions into nursing practice.</p>en
dc.subjectevidence-based practiceen
dc.subjectreproducibility of resultsen
dc.subjectresearch designen
dc.date.available2017-07-19T14:51:12Z-
dc.date.issued2017-07-19-
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-19T14:51:12Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.name28th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.conference.locationDublin, Irelanden
dc.descriptionEvent Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarshipen
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