2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/621934
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
Leadership Insights of Senior Nurse Executives
Other Titles:
Nursing Leadership
Author(s):
Hughes, Robie
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Pi Nu
Author Details:
Robie Hughes, DSN, RN, CNS, Professional Experience: I have a total of 9 years of experience in instructional design, educational leadership, and teaching. I have served in leadership positions to include a clinic CEO, a dean for an associate degree program for health care sciences, and a nurse executive for a multi-site healthcare service. Author Summary: Dr. Vickie Hughes has serviced in various clinical, educational, and leadership positions over the last 30+ years. She currently serves as an Assistant Professor at Johns Hopkins School of Nursing. Her research is in the areas of nursing leadership development, cultural factors that influence nursing leadership, and nursing leadership outcomes
Abstract:

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to identify characteristics, behaviors, and context for top performing nurse executive leaders.

Methods: A qualitative study of 8 senior ranking, retired United States military nurse executives was approved by the institutional IRB to conduct semi-structured interviews utilizing the historical narrative method. A modified “Life History Questionnaire: Nurses”, developed by Dr. Lucinda McCray was utilized to guide the semi-structures interviews. All interviews were conducted within an eight-month time period. The interviews were audio recorded, and then transcribed verbatim. The transcribed data was examined both in historical context and narrative themes using DiCicco-Bloom and Crabtree’s qualitative technique as described in “Making sense of qualitative research” (2006).

Results: Each of the nurses served in a top leadership position during a different time frame. Contextual factors related to health care policies, political environment, and develop of nursing as a profession were discussed. Leadership challenges and accomplishments were identified. Personal characteristics of integrity, service, sacrifice, and humility were consistent, however, leadership strategies varied some based on contextual factors. Stories were extremely touching, emotionally moving, and rewarding.

Conclusion: The combined executive leadership experience of the 8 nurses stretched across 32 years with combined responsibility over 100,000 nurses revealing the stages of nurse advancement from the role of hand-maiden to the role of advanced practice nurse and healthcare executive. The visionary leadership impact of the 8 executive nurses interviewed was nothing less than transformational. The insights from this study have relevance to a broader range of health care leadership roles. Nurses are uniquely prepared through their education and clinical practices to lead teams, but require additional knowledge and skills before successfully moving into executive healthcare leadership. The insight gained from this study demonstrates that retired Senior Nurse Executives can play a vital role in facilitating the success of the next generation of nurse executive leaders.

Keywords:
Executive; Leadership; Nurse
Repository Posting Date:
19-Jul-2017
Date of Publication:
19-Jul-2017
Other Identifiers:
INRC17L09
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
28th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Dublin, Ireland
Description:
Event Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarship

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.titleLeadership Insights of Senior Nurse Executivesen_US
dc.title.alternativeNursing Leadershipen
dc.contributor.authorHughes, Robieen
dc.contributor.departmentPi Nuen
dc.author.detailsRobie Hughes, DSN, RN, CNS, Professional Experience: I have a total of 9 years of experience in instructional design, educational leadership, and teaching. I have served in leadership positions to include a clinic CEO, a dean for an associate degree program for health care sciences, and a nurse executive for a multi-site healthcare service. Author Summary: Dr. Vickie Hughes has serviced in various clinical, educational, and leadership positions over the last 30+ years. She currently serves as an Assistant Professor at Johns Hopkins School of Nursing. Her research is in the areas of nursing leadership development, cultural factors that influence nursing leadership, and nursing leadership outcomesen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/621934-
dc.description.abstract<p><strong>Purpose: </strong><span>The purpose of this study was to identify characteristics, behaviors, and context for top performing nurse executive leaders.</span></p> <p><strong>Methods: </strong>A qualitative study of 8 senior ranking, retired United States military nurse executives was approved by the institutional IRB to conduct semi-structured interviews utilizing the historical narrative method. A modified “Life History Questionnaire: Nurses”, developed by Dr. Lucinda McCray was utilized to guide the semi-structures interviews. All interviews were conducted within an eight-month time period. The interviews were audio recorded, and then transcribed verbatim. The transcribed data was examined both in historical context and narrative themes using DiCicco-Bloom and Crabtree’s qualitative technique as described in “Making sense of qualitative research” (2006).</p> <p><strong>Results: </strong>Each of the nurses served in a top leadership position during a different time frame. Contextual factors related to health care policies, political environment, and develop of nursing as a profession were discussed. Leadership challenges and accomplishments were identified. Personal characteristics of integrity, service, sacrifice, and humility were consistent, however, leadership strategies varied some based on contextual factors. Stories were extremely touching, emotionally moving, and rewarding.</p> <p><strong>Conclusion: </strong>The combined executive leadership experience of the 8 nurses stretched across 32 years with combined responsibility over 100,000 nurses revealing the stages of nurse advancement from the role of hand-maiden to the role of advanced practice nurse and healthcare executive. The visionary leadership impact of the 8 executive nurses interviewed was nothing less than transformational. The insights from this study have relevance to a broader range of health care leadership roles. Nurses are uniquely prepared through their education and clinical practices to lead teams, but require additional knowledge and skills before successfully moving into executive healthcare leadership. The insight gained from this study demonstrates that retired Senior Nurse Executives can play a vital role in facilitating the success of the next generation of nurse executive leaders.</p>en
dc.subjectExecutiveen
dc.subjectLeadershipen
dc.subjectNurseen
dc.date.available2017-07-19T17:38:40Z-
dc.date.issued2017-07-19-
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-19T17:38:40Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.name28th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.conference.locationDublin, Irelanden
dc.descriptionEvent Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarshipen
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