2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/621935
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Poster
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
The Value of the Caring Moment in Patient Advocacy
Author(s):
Emeghebo, Lorraine E.; Lamaute, Kathleen M.; Dauz, Kathleen Maree; Ponton, Sonia; Kunz, Antoinette
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Epsilon Kappa
Author Details:
Lorraine Emeghebo, EdD, MS, BSN, BS, RN, Professional Experience: Sigma Theta Tau Honor Society Epsilon Kappa Leadership Succession Committee (2010–current) Foundation of the National Student Nurses’ Assn Scholarship Selection Committee(2010 – current) Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society Region 14 - Co-chair Mentoring subcommittee (2012 – current) Eastern Nursing Research Society – Member Teacher’s College Nursing Education Alumni Assn: Awards Committee New York State Student Nurses’ Assn - Sustaining Member Sigma Theta Tau Honor Society Epsilon Kappa Leadership Succession Committee (2010–current) Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society Region 14 - Co-chair Mentoring subcommittee (2012 – current) Article title: THE IMAGE OF NURSING AS PERCEIVED BY NURSES Journal title: Nurse Education Today Online publication complete: 12-NOV-2011 DOI information: 10.1016/j.nedt.2011.10.015 NCSBN NCLEX examination item development panel Poster Presentation at the National Student Nurses’ Association Convention in Pittsburgh 2012 Molloy College Research Funded Grant - Eat...Play...Move: A CBPR Plan to Promote Healthy Eating, Cooperative Play and Active Movement in Disadvantaged School Children Author Summary: Dr Lorraine is a Nurse Educator at Molloy College Rockville Center NY. She teaches Med/Surg and Nursing Research to Undergraduate student nurses and in the PhD program at Molloy College. She also is a dissertation editor
Abstract:

Purpose:

As student nurses navigate their way through clinical experiences, they may not understand how to learn the value of caring through patient advocacy. According to a study conducted by Archarya Pandey & Chalise, (2015), nursing students have low levels of self-esteem. They therefore, may feel that they do not have the necessary education to advocate for their patients. The American Nurses Association (ANA) states that high quality practice should include advocacy as an integral component of patient safety (ANA, n.d.). The purpose of this research study was to explore the experience of nursing students’ caring advocacy using the basic concepts of human-to-human caring during the therapeutic relationship with their patients in the clinical setting. According to Ozam and Oumus (2015), the four basic concepts of Human-to-Human Caring include healing processes, interpersonal maintenance of relationship, the caring moment, and awareness of healing. The basic question was: “when you are a student nurse, where does advocacy begin?” Advocacy is the pillar of nursing and nursing students may not be aware of the extent that they advocate for their patients.

Methods:

This is a qualitative study, based on Dr. Jean Watson’s Theory of Human Caring. Watson’s theoretical framework was used to capture the essences of the participant’s experiences. A convenient purposive sampling of 26 senior level nursing students from a baccalaureate Nursing program in the Northeastern region of the United States completed a survey of three statements: 1) describe a caring moment you have experienced in the clinical setting; 2) identify the phase of the therapeutic relationship where the caring moment happened; 3) what specific actions, if any, did you take? Four themes synthesized from the data were: 1) communication 2) relationship 3) advocacy and 4) presence.

Results:

Rich data was unearthed as participants clearly described moments in their relationship with their patient when their presence communicated advocating for their patient and their family. They all described feeling a rewarding moment, although they did not recognize that advocacy was what they were doing.

Conclusion:

Findings from this study illuminated the interaction between students’ motivation to be present for their patients and their clinical experience. Findings from this research study may also add to nursing education curriculum by emphasizing caring moments during the phases of the therapeutic relationship.

Keywords:
Nursing student; Advocacy; Clinical setting
Repository Posting Date:
19-Jul-2017
Date of Publication:
19-Jul-2017
Other Identifiers:
INRC17PST594
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
28th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Dublin, Ireland
Description:
Event Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarship

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePosteren
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.titleThe Value of the Caring Moment in Patient Advocacyen_US
dc.contributor.authorEmeghebo, Lorraine E.en
dc.contributor.authorLamaute, Kathleen M.en
dc.contributor.authorDauz, Kathleen Mareeen
dc.contributor.authorPonton, Soniaen
dc.contributor.authorKunz, Antoinetteen
dc.contributor.departmentEpsilon Kappaen
dc.author.detailsLorraine Emeghebo, EdD, MS, BSN, BS, RN, Professional Experience: Sigma Theta Tau Honor Society Epsilon Kappa Leadership Succession Committee (2010–current) Foundation of the National Student Nurses’ Assn Scholarship Selection Committee(2010 – current) Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society Region 14 - Co-chair Mentoring subcommittee (2012 – current) Eastern Nursing Research Society – Member Teacher’s College Nursing Education Alumni Assn: Awards Committee New York State Student Nurses’ Assn - Sustaining Member Sigma Theta Tau Honor Society Epsilon Kappa Leadership Succession Committee (2010–current) Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society Region 14 - Co-chair Mentoring subcommittee (2012 – current) Article title: THE IMAGE OF NURSING AS PERCEIVED BY NURSES Journal title: Nurse Education Today Online publication complete: 12-NOV-2011 DOI information: 10.1016/j.nedt.2011.10.015 NCSBN NCLEX examination item development panel Poster Presentation at the National Student Nurses’ Association Convention in Pittsburgh 2012 Molloy College Research Funded Grant - Eat...Play...Move: A CBPR Plan to Promote Healthy Eating, Cooperative Play and Active Movement in Disadvantaged School Children Author Summary: Dr Lorraine is a Nurse Educator at Molloy College Rockville Center NY. She teaches Med/Surg and Nursing Research to Undergraduate student nurses and in the PhD program at Molloy College. She also is a dissertation editoren
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/621935-
dc.description.abstract<p><strong>Purpose:</strong></p> <p>As student nurses navigate their way through clinical experiences, they may not understand how to learn the value of caring through patient advocacy. According to a study conducted by Archarya Pandey & Chalise, (2015), nursing students have low levels of self-esteem. They therefore, may feel that they do not have the necessary education to advocate for their patients. The American Nurses Association (ANA) states that high quality practice should include advocacy as an integral component of patient safety (<a href="http://nursingworld.org/MainMenuCategories/ANAMarketplace/ANAPeriodicals/OJIN/TableofContents/Vol-17-2012/No1-Jan-2012/Florence-Nightingale-on-Advocacy.html#ANAnd">ANA, n.d.</a>). The purpose of this research study was to explore the experience of nursing students’ caring advocacy using the basic concepts of human-to-human caring during the therapeutic relationship with their patients in the clinical setting. According to Ozam and Oumus (2015), the four basic concepts of Human-to-Human Caring include healing processes, interpersonal maintenance of relationship, the caring moment, and awareness of healing. The basic question was: “when you are a student nurse, where does advocacy begin?” Advocacy is the pillar of nursing and nursing students may not be aware of the extent that they advocate for their patients.</p> <p><strong>Methods:</strong></p> <p>This is a qualitative study, based on Dr. Jean Watson’s Theory of Human Caring. Watson’s theoretical framework was used to capture the essences of the participant’s experiences. A convenient purposive sampling of 26 senior level nursing students from a baccalaureate Nursing program in the Northeastern region of the United States completed a survey of three statements: 1) describe a caring moment you have experienced in the clinical setting; 2) identify the phase of the therapeutic relationship where the caring moment happened; 3) what specific actions, if any, did you take? Four themes synthesized from the data were: 1) communication 2) relationship 3) advocacy and 4) presence.</p> <p><strong>Results:</strong></p> <p>Rich data was unearthed as participants clearly described moments in their relationship with their patient when their presence communicated advocating for their patient and their family. They all described feeling a rewarding moment, although they did not recognize that advocacy was what they were doing.</p> <p><strong>Conclusion:</strong></p> <p>Findings from this study illuminated the interaction between students’ motivation to be present for their patients and their clinical experience. Findings from this research study may also add to nursing education curriculum by emphasizing caring moments during the phases of the therapeutic relationship.</p>en
dc.subjectNursing studenten
dc.subjectAdvocacyen
dc.subjectClinical settingen
dc.date.available2017-07-19T17:45:23Z-
dc.date.issued2017-07-19-
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-19T17:45:23Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.name28th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.conference.locationDublin, Irelanden
dc.descriptionEvent Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarshipen
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