In-Home Air Pollution is Associated With Respiratory Symptoms in Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/621940
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Poster
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
In-Home Air Pollution is Associated With Respiratory Symptoms in Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
Author(s):
Guo, Su-Er
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Lambda Beta-at-Large
Author Details:
Su-Er Guo, PhD, RN, Professional Experience: 2014-present -- Professor and director of Chronic diseases & health promotion research center, Chang Gung University of Science and Technology, Taiwan, R.O.C. 2010-2013 -- Associate Professor and director of Chronic diseases & health promotion research center, Chang Gung University of Science and Technology, Taiwan, R.O.C. 2008-10 -- Assistant Professor, School of Nursing, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC, Canada Responsible for development and implementation of PM research and education program for COPD patients(2011-present) Author Summary: I am a researcher who focuses on pulmonary rehabilitation and smoking cessation in patients with COPD. Recently I expand my interested research to the influence of particulate matter on health in COPD patients.
Abstract:

Background: Ambient particulate matter (PM) has shown adverse effects of health on respiratory diseases. To date, although studies have demonstrated that PM was associated with increased morbidity, readmission rates, resource utilization, and the mortality in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), few studies investigated the influences of indoor PM on respiratory symptoms, lung function, and acute exacerbations in patients with COPD. Objective: In this longitudinal study, we investigated the relationships between indoor PM (PM2.5 & PM10), respiratory symptoms, lung function, and acute exacerbations in patients with moderate to very severe COPD. Methods: Indoor air quality (PM2.5 and PM10levels) was monitored by using an aerosol spectrometer (Model TSI8532) in the patients’ bedroom, kitchen, living room, and front door at baseline and every two months until one year. At each home visit, the patients were asked to complete spirometry and questionnaire testing, including respiratory symptoms and clinical characteristics. Respiratory symptoms were evaluated using a modified version of the symptoms section of the St. George’s Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ). Clinical characteristics included Charlson comorbidity index (CCI), FEV1 at first visit, and length of COPD diagnosis in years. Exacerbations were assessed by chart review. Generalized estimating equation (GEE) analysis was used to analyze data. Results: The results of the present study (n = 83) showed that the level of wheezing was significantly higher in patients whose living room and kitchen had abnormal (higher than the maximum accepted) PM2.5 (= 0.80; B = 1.03, respectively) and PM10 levels (= 0.36; B = 0.38, respectively). Conclusions and clinical application: Increased PM levels were associated with worse respiratory symptom and increased admission rate in patients with moderate to very severe COPD. Future investigations are needed to determine the effectiveness of environmental interventions or self-management programs to reduce PM concentrations and improve health outcomes in this susceptible population.

Keywords:
Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD); Indoor Air Quality; Respiratory Symptoms
Repository Posting Date:
19-Jul-2017
Date of Publication:
19-Jul-2017
Other Identifiers:
INRC17PST18
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
28th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Dublin, Ireland
Description:
Event Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarship

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePosteren
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.titleIn-Home Air Pollution is Associated With Respiratory Symptoms in Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Diseaseen_US
dc.contributor.authorGuo, Su-Eren
dc.contributor.departmentLambda Beta-at-Largeen
dc.author.detailsSu-Er Guo, PhD, RN, Professional Experience: 2014-present -- Professor and director of Chronic diseases & health promotion research center, Chang Gung University of Science and Technology, Taiwan, R.O.C. 2010-2013 -- Associate Professor and director of Chronic diseases & health promotion research center, Chang Gung University of Science and Technology, Taiwan, R.O.C. 2008-10 -- Assistant Professor, School of Nursing, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC, Canada Responsible for development and implementation of PM research and education program for COPD patients(2011-present) Author Summary: I am a researcher who focuses on pulmonary rehabilitation and smoking cessation in patients with COPD. Recently I expand my interested research to the influence of particulate matter on health in COPD patients.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/621940-
dc.description.abstract<p><strong>Background: </strong><span>Ambient particulate matter (PM) has shown adverse effects of health on respiratory diseases. To date, although studies have demonstrated that PM was associated with increased morbidity, readmission rates, resource utilization, and the mortality in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), few studies investigated the influences of indoor PM on respiratory symptoms, lung function, and acute exacerbations in patients with COPD. </span><strong>Objective:</strong><span> In this longitudinal study, we investigated the relationships between indoor PM (PM</span><sub>2.5</sub><span> & PM</span><sub>10</sub><span>), respiratory symptoms, lung function, and acute exacerbations in patients with moderate to very severe COPD. </span><strong>Methods:</strong><span> Indoor air quality (PM</span><sub>2.5</sub><span> and PM</span><sub>10</sub><span>levels) was monitored by using an aerosol spectrometer (Model TSI8532) in the patients’ bedroom, kitchen, living room, and front door at baseline and every two months until one year. At each home visit, the patients were asked to complete spirometry and questionnaire testing, including respiratory symptoms and clinical characteristics. Respiratory symptoms were evaluated using a modified version of the symptoms section of the St. George’s Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ). Clinical characteristics included Charlson comorbidity index (CCI), FEV</span><sub>1</sub><span> at first visit, and length of COPD diagnosis in years. Exacerbations were assessed by chart review. Generalized estimating equation (GEE) analysis was used to analyze data. </span><strong>Results:</strong><span> The results of the present study (</span><em>n</em><span> = 83) showed that the level of wheezing was significantly higher in patients whose living room and kitchen had abnormal (higher than the maximum accepted) PM</span><sub>2.5</sub><span> (</span><em>B </em><span>= 0.80;</span><em> B </em><span>= 1.03, respectively) and</span><sub> </sub><span>PM</span><sub>10</sub><span> levels (</span><em>B </em><span>= 0.36;</span><em> B </em><span>= 0.38, respectively). </span><strong>Conclusions and clinical application: </strong><span>Increased PM levels were associated with worse respiratory symptom and increased admission rate in patients with moderate to very severe COPD. Future investigations are needed to determine the effectiveness of environmental interventions or self-management programs to reduce PM concentrations and improve health outcomes in this susceptible population.</span></p>en
dc.subjectChronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)en
dc.subjectIndoor Air Qualityen
dc.subjectRespiratory Symptomsen
dc.date.available2017-07-19T18:07:21Z-
dc.date.issued2017-07-19-
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-19T18:07:21Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.name28th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.conference.locationDublin, Irelanden
dc.descriptionEvent Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarshipen
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