Health Professionals' Knowledge, Attitudes, Experiences, Confidence, and Behaviors Regarding Advance Directives

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/621944
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Poster
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
Health Professionals' Knowledge, Attitudes, Experiences, Confidence, and Behaviors Regarding Advance Directives
Author(s):
Wu, Shu-Fen; Tung, Hong-Yi; Lin, Yu-Hua; Lee, Chao-Hsien; Liao, Hsiu-Chen; Ching, Ching-Yun
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Lambda Beta-at-Large
Author Details:
Shu-Fen Wu, MSN, RN, Professional Experience: 1984-86 -- RN, Department of Nursing, Mackay Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan 1992-99 -- RN, Department of Anesthesiology, Chang Gung Medical Foundation Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan 2002-2016 -- RN, Department of Anesthesiology & Nursing, Yuan's General Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan 2014-16 -- Adjunct Lecture, Department of Health Business Administration, Meiho University, Pingtung, Taiwan 2016 -- RN, Department of Anesthesiology, E-Da Dachang Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan 2016 -- Adjunct Lecture, Department of Nursing, I-Shou University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan Author or coauthor of 20 publications primarily relating to cancer nursing and research. Author Summary: Shu-Fen Wu obtained her master's degree from the school of nursing management, I-Shou University in 2013. She is currently director of nursing anesthesia E-Dachang hospital, and adjunct lecture teacher of health business administration I-Shou University. Her current research focuses on clinical and cancer nursing.
Abstract:

Purpose:

 Advance directives (ADs) are one of the few means for people to indicate their end-of-life treatment decision preference. The purpose of this study was to determine the ADs compaction knowledge, attitudes, experiences, confidence, and behaviors of health professions.

Methods:

 This was a descriptive correlational research that targeted 765 subjects (included 43 physicians, 424 nurses, 85 other medical staffs, and 213 administration staffs) working in a regional hospital in southern Taiwan. The structured questionnaires gathered the knowledge, attitudes, experiential survey on advance directives (KAESAD) instrument and basic demographic data with regard to advance directives. Data were analyzed by using SPSS 20.0 software. Descriptive statistics, independent test, chi-square test (x2), Pearson product-moment correlation, one way ANOVA, and Binary logistic regression were used for data analysis.

Results:

 The results indicated that signing advance directives consent form is low. Only 1.8% of the health professionals had completed advance directives, although 86. 3% indicated their willingness to have one. The first two reasons for signing include: not want to be burden on their family (85.9%), and ensure the quality at end-of-life (85.5%). The first two reasons why health professionals do not want to sign are: they still have plenty of time to make end-of-life decision (33.3%), and self-perceived health status (31.0%). Age, working years, and attitudes were found to correlate positively with knowledge. Knowledge, attitudes, and experiences were found to correlate positively with confidence. The result of questionnaire survey, the total knowledge, experience of ADs scores and total confidences is low, held positive attitudes toward ADs. Between groups that physicians have more knowledge, attitudes, experiences, and confidence of ADs compared with other groups. In addition the mean scores for professional experiences with end of life decision-making were low in physicians with nurses (physicians 56.00±3.54; nurses 57.16±4.80). Have “relatives and friends suffering from serious illness experience” and heard “advance hospice palliative care & life-sustaining treatment choices of intent” could be used as predictive factors for ADs in nurse group (Nagelkerke R Square= .082). The self is the primary medical decision maker and have “relatives and friends suffering from serious illness experience” could be used as predictive factors for ADs in other medical staffs group (Nagelkerke R Square= .292). Have “relatives and friends were suffering from serious illness experience”, not heard “any advance hospice palliative care document” and “have experience of ADs” could be used as predictive factors for ADs in administration staffs group (Nagelkerke R Square= .123).

Conclusion:

The study findings showed that health professionals’ have insufficient knowledge, inadequate practices, and had lower completion rate of ADs. Such indicates the need for designing different of clinical educational programming to provide health personnel's knowledge and experience and enhance ADs facilitation effectiveness.

Keywords:
Knowledge; Advance Directives; Attitude
Repository Posting Date:
19-Jul-2017
Date of Publication:
19-Jul-2017
Other Identifiers:
INRC17PST689
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
28th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Dublin, Ireland
Description:
Event Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarship

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePosteren
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.titleHealth Professionals' Knowledge, Attitudes, Experiences, Confidence, and Behaviors Regarding Advance Directivesen_US
dc.contributor.authorWu, Shu-Fenen
dc.contributor.authorTung, Hong-Yien
dc.contributor.authorLin, Yu-Huaen
dc.contributor.authorLee, Chao-Hsienen
dc.contributor.authorLiao, Hsiu-Chenen
dc.contributor.authorChing, Ching-Yunen
dc.contributor.departmentLambda Beta-at-Largeen
dc.author.detailsShu-Fen Wu, MSN, RN, Professional Experience: 1984-86 -- RN, Department of Nursing, Mackay Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan 1992-99 -- RN, Department of Anesthesiology, Chang Gung Medical Foundation Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan 2002-2016 -- RN, Department of Anesthesiology & Nursing, Yuan's General Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan 2014-16 -- Adjunct Lecture, Department of Health Business Administration, Meiho University, Pingtung, Taiwan 2016 -- RN, Department of Anesthesiology, E-Da Dachang Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan 2016 -- Adjunct Lecture, Department of Nursing, I-Shou University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan Author or coauthor of 20 publications primarily relating to cancer nursing and research. Author Summary: Shu-Fen Wu obtained her master's degree from the school of nursing management, I-Shou University in 2013. She is currently director of nursing anesthesia E-Dachang hospital, and adjunct lecture teacher of health business administration I-Shou University. Her current research focuses on clinical and cancer nursing.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/621944-
dc.description.abstract<p><strong>Purpose:</strong></p> <p> Advance directives (ADs) are one of the few means for people to indicate their end-of-life treatment decision preference. The purpose of this study was to determine the ADs compaction knowledge, attitudes, experiences, confidence, and behaviors of health professions.</p> <p><strong>Methods:</strong></p> <p> This was a descriptive correlational research that targeted 765 subjects (included 43 physicians, 424 nurses, 85 other medical staffs, and 213 administration staffs) working in a regional hospital in southern Taiwan. The structured questionnaires gathered the knowledge, attitudes, experiential survey on advance directives (KAESAD) instrument and basic demographic data with regard to advance directives. Data were analyzed by using SPSS 20.0 software. Descriptive statistics, independent <em>t </em>test, chi-square test (<em>x</em><sup>2</sup>), Pearson product-moment correlation, one way ANOVA, and Binary logistic regression were used for data analysis.</p> <p><strong>Results:</strong></p> <p> The results indicated that signing advance directives consent form is low. Only 1.8% of the health professionals had completed advance directives, although 86. 3% indicated their willingness to have one. The first two reasons for signing include: not want to be burden on their family (85.9%), and ensure the quality at end-of-life (85.5%). The first two reasons why health professionals do not want to sign are: they still have plenty of time to make end-of-life decision (33.3%), and self-perceived health status (31.0%). Age, working years, and attitudes were found to correlate positively with knowledge. Knowledge, attitudes, and experiences were found to correlate positively with confidence. The result of questionnaire survey, the total knowledge, experience of ADs scores and total confidences is low, held positive attitudes toward ADs. Between groups that physicians have more knowledge, attitudes, experiences, and confidence of ADs compared with other groups. In addition the mean scores for professional experiences with end of life decision-making were low in physicians with nurses (physicians 56.00±3.54; nurses 57.16±4.80). Have “relatives and friends suffering from serious illness experience” and heard “advance hospice palliative care & life-sustaining treatment choices of intent” could be used as predictive factors for ADs in nurse group (Nagelkerke R Square= .082). The self is the primary medical decision maker and have “relatives and friends suffering from serious illness experience” could be used as predictive factors for ADs in other medical staffs group (Nagelkerke R Square= .292). Have “relatives and friends were suffering from serious illness experience”, not heard “any advance hospice palliative care document” and “have experience of ADs” could be used as predictive factors for ADs in administration staffs group (Nagelkerke R Square= .123).</p> <p><strong>Conclusion:</strong></p> <p>The study findings showed that health professionals’ have insufficient knowledge, inadequate practices, and had lower completion rate of ADs. Such indicates the need for designing different of clinical educational programming to provide health personnel's knowledge and experience and enhance ADs facilitation effectiveness.</p>en
dc.subjectKnowledgeen
dc.subjectAdvance Directivesen
dc.subjectAttitudeen
dc.date.available2017-07-19T18:33:54Z-
dc.date.issued2017-07-19-
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-19T18:33:54Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.name28th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.conference.locationDublin, Irelanden
dc.descriptionEvent Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarshipen
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