Uncovering Issues Most Important to Parents After Their Child's Suicide Attempt: A Comparison Study

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/621945
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Poster
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
Uncovering Issues Most Important to Parents After Their Child's Suicide Attempt: A Comparison Study
Author(s):
Hickey, Kari Lynne; Rossetti, Jeanette; Strom, Jan; Klein, Kendal
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Beta Omega
Author Details:
Kari Lynne Hickey, PhD, RN, Professional Experience: Funded research in area of examining experiences of parents whose child has made a non-lethal suicide attempt. $2000 grant completed Fall 2014. Awarded $20000 grant to examine experiences of rural parents-2014 Nursing Portfolio Committee Chair (2014-present) Nursing Portfolio Committee Member (2011-present) Curriculum and Evaluation Committee (2007-2016) Author Summary: Kari Hickey is an assistant professor and has been awarded 3 grants to examine this topic, presented 2 posters on the outcomes of this research and has published one data results article. She is a member of American Psychiatric Nurses Association and Sigma Theta Tau-Beta Omega chapter.
Abstract:

Purpose:

The purpose of this presentation is to compare two studies that surveyed adolescent mental health experts practicing in a suburban and rural setting on their perspectives as to what matters most to parents after their child has made a non-lethal suicide attempt.

Methods:

A Delphi technique was utilized with an interdisciplinary panel of adolescent mental health experts in a suburban and a rural mental health setting. Inclusion criteria for the expert panel were over the age of 18 and clinically worked with adolescents who have made a non-lethal suicide attempt and their families. First round questions asked the panelists to provide their opinions as to what matters most for parents whose child has made a non-lethal suicide attempt, what are the needs of parents whose child has made a non-lethal suicide attempt, and what are the current treatment interventions for parents whose child has made a non-lethal suicide attempt.

Using the constant comparative method, two researchers analyzed the data for emerging themes. The themes from each questions were then returned to the participants in a second survey. They were asked to rank the importance of each theme on a 5 point Likert scale (1, very important; 2, quite important; 3-neither important or unimportant; 4-quite unimportant; 5-very unimportant).

Results:

31 total participants from a suburban setting and 18 from the rural setting completed both rounds of the surveys. Professional titles of participants included registered nurse, clinical therapist, social worker, behavioral health associate, and advanced practice nurse.

Both groups indicated that keeping their child safe, understanding what caused the attempt, and how to access support was very important for parents after a non-lethal suicide attempt. Both groups also thought the most important need for parents is education on how to prevent another attempt. In regards to treatment interventions, both groups noted therapy (individual and family) and support groups; however, the rural providers emphasized the Screening, Assessment, and Support Services (SASS). From comparing these two groups of adolescent mental health providers, it was clear that rural providers highlighted the use of SASS as part of the treatment team. Rural providers also consistently cited the need for accessible resources and support. The provider mix of both groups included substantially fewer registered nurses in the rural group.

Conclusion:

It is clear from the opinions of the adolescent mental health practitioners that safety of their child is a priority concern of parents after their child has made a non-lethal suicide attempt. This finding may indicate that professionals working with these parents must address the safety concerns before continuing with other therapeutic interventions. Data from both the studies will inform a qualitative research study utilizing focus groups with parents of adolescents who have made a non-lethal suicide attempt to uncover what issues are most important to them.

Keywords:
adolescent suicide; parents; provider perspective
Repository Posting Date:
19-Jul-2017
Date of Publication:
19-Jul-2017
Other Identifiers:
INRC17PST605
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
28th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Dublin, Ireland
Description:
Event Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarship

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePosteren
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.titleUncovering Issues Most Important to Parents After Their Child's Suicide Attempt: A Comparison Studyen_US
dc.contributor.authorHickey, Kari Lynneen
dc.contributor.authorRossetti, Jeanetteen
dc.contributor.authorStrom, Janen
dc.contributor.authorKlein, Kendalen
dc.contributor.departmentBeta Omegaen
dc.author.detailsKari Lynne Hickey, PhD, RN, Professional Experience: Funded research in area of examining experiences of parents whose child has made a non-lethal suicide attempt. $2000 grant completed Fall 2014. Awarded $20000 grant to examine experiences of rural parents-2014 Nursing Portfolio Committee Chair (2014-present) Nursing Portfolio Committee Member (2011-present) Curriculum and Evaluation Committee (2007-2016) Author Summary: Kari Hickey is an assistant professor and has been awarded 3 grants to examine this topic, presented 2 posters on the outcomes of this research and has published one data results article. She is a member of American Psychiatric Nurses Association and Sigma Theta Tau-Beta Omega chapter.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/621945-
dc.description.abstract<p><strong>Purpose:</strong></p> <p>The purpose of this presentation is to compare two studies that surveyed adolescent mental health experts practicing in a suburban and rural setting on their perspectives as to what matters most to parents after their child has made a non-lethal suicide attempt.</p> <p><strong>Methods:</strong></p> <p>A Delphi technique was utilized with an interdisciplinary panel of adolescent mental health experts in a suburban and a rural mental health setting. Inclusion criteria for the expert panel were over the age of 18 and clinically worked with adolescents who have made a non-lethal suicide attempt and their families. First round questions asked the panelists to provide their opinions as to what matters most for parents whose child has made a non-lethal suicide attempt, what are the needs of parents whose child has made a non-lethal suicide attempt, and what are the current treatment interventions for parents whose child has made a non-lethal suicide attempt.</p> <p>Using the constant comparative method, two researchers analyzed the data for emerging themes. The themes from each questions were then returned to the participants in a second survey. They were asked to rank the importance of each theme on a 5 point Likert scale (1, very important; 2, quite important; 3-neither important or unimportant; 4-quite unimportant; 5-very unimportant).</p> <p><strong>Results:</strong></p> <p>31 total participants from a suburban setting and 18 from the rural setting completed both rounds of the surveys. Professional titles of participants included registered nurse, clinical therapist, social worker, behavioral health associate, and advanced practice nurse.</p> <p>Both groups indicated that keeping their child safe, understanding what caused the attempt, and how to access support was very important for parents after a non-lethal suicide attempt. Both groups also thought the most important need for parents is education on how to prevent another attempt. In regards to treatment interventions, both groups noted therapy (individual and family) and support groups; however, the rural providers emphasized the Screening, Assessment, and Support Services (SASS). From comparing these two groups of adolescent mental health providers, it was clear that rural providers highlighted the use of SASS as part of the treatment team. Rural providers also consistently cited the need for accessible resources and support. The provider mix of both groups included substantially fewer registered nurses in the rural group.</p> <p><strong>Conclusion:</strong></p> <p>It is clear from the opinions of the adolescent mental health practitioners that safety of their child is a priority concern of parents after their child has made a non-lethal suicide attempt. This finding may indicate that professionals working with these parents must address the safety concerns before continuing with other therapeutic interventions. Data from both the studies will inform a qualitative research study utilizing focus groups with parents of adolescents who have made a non-lethal suicide attempt to uncover what issues are most important to them.</p>en
dc.subjectadolescent suicideen
dc.subjectparentsen
dc.subjectprovider perspectiveen
dc.date.available2017-07-19T18:50:30Z-
dc.date.issued2017-07-19-
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-19T18:50:30Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.name28th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.conference.locationDublin, Irelanden
dc.descriptionEvent Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarshipen
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