A Case-Oriented, Cross-Country Comparison of Three High-Income Countries' Health Systems and Healthcare Accessibility

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/621953
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
A Case-Oriented, Cross-Country Comparison of Three High-Income Countries' Health Systems and Healthcare Accessibility
Other Titles:
Cross-Country Health Systems
Author(s):
Anderson, Sue A.; Zlotnick, Cheryl; Heaslip, Vanessa
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Alpha
Author Details:
Sue A. Anderson, PhD, MS, BSN, BS, AS, RN, FNP-BC, Professional Experience: 1995-Present: IU South Bend, College of Health Sciences, School of Nursing: Visiting lecturer 1995-1997; Lecturer 1997-2011; Assistant Professor 2012-Present. Graduate Program Director, 2014-present. 2001-Present: Family Nurse Practitioner at Campbell Ear, Nose & Throat (formerly known as ENT of Michiana): 2001- present. 1997-2001: Family Nurse Practitioner at Holm Memorial Clinic. 1993-1996: Registered Nurse at Memorial Hospital of South Bend Emergency Trauma Center. Responsible for teaching undergraduate and graduate nursing students since 1995. Currently serving the Graduate Program Director for the Master of Science in Nursing Family Nurse Practitioner program at IU South Bend. Family Nurse Practitioner providing otorhinolaryngology care to at-risk patients in South Bend, Indiana since 2001. Completed dissertation research with Hispanic mothers in 2011. Engaged in research project with Hispanic community investigating impact of economy on cardiovascular health. Volunteer health care provider at several Hispanic community health fairs. Author Summary: Sue Anderson is an Associate Professor and Family Nurse Practitioner Program Coordinator in the DNP Program at St. Mary's College. In addition to her work as a nurse educator, Dr. Anderson also maintains a clinical practice as a Family Nurse Practitioner. Her research has focused on health promotion practices including obesity risk, leisure time activity, and health disparities.
Abstract:

Purpose: Located on different continents, the United Kingdom (UK), Israel and the United States (US) are high income countries differing in size, population size, and type of health care systems; yet, their general population's health outcomes are similar. This study used qualitative and quantitative information to gain insight on the health care systems and health care accessibility of vulnerable groups in the general populations of these three industrialized countries.

Methods: Using a case-oriented, cross-country comparison, this study uses the three factors of the Behavioral Model of Utilization (i.e., health system environments, population characteristics and health behaviors/outcomes) to examine health care accessibility for selected vulnerable groups in each of the three countries (i.e., Israel, UK, US).  

Results: The health system environments and population characteristics differed dramatically. The health system of the United Kingdom had open access to all; Israel’s health system provided basic healthcare to all citizens, yet citizens could opt for different levels of services. The fee-for-service system in the US resulted in barriers to healthcare access for vulnerable citizens. Regardless of the type of healthcare system and level of access to health care, all three countries experienced threats to health. All health systems showed features indicating their adaptation to the dominant or majority group of the country’s general population. However, all three high income countries' health systems were inadequate at addressing vulnerable population groups (i.e., socioeconomically low income individuals, minorities, immigrants, non-citizens) as demonstrated by unmet need and inadequate health behaviors.

Conclusion: Despite the diversity of health system philosophies and approaches, none of the health systems were effective at addressing health care inaccessibility and or unmet need for vulnerable population groups. Health systems in high income countries must acknowledge that access to healthcare is an important component of a healthy population; knowledge development of specific strategies to improve health within communities is equally important. Health systems in the three countries lack strategies that proactively engage, reach-out to and facilitate health care access for vulnerable populations. Nurses must be fully engaged through their work and research within communities to strengthen health systems and improve the health of all.

Keywords:
health promotion; health systems; vulnerable populations
Repository Posting Date:
19-Jul-2017
Date of Publication:
19-Jul-2017
Other Identifiers:
INRC17S07
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
28th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Dublin, Ireland
Description:
Event Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarship

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.titleA Case-Oriented, Cross-Country Comparison of Three High-Income Countries' Health Systems and Healthcare Accessibilityen_US
dc.title.alternativeCross-Country Health Systemsen
dc.contributor.authorAnderson, Sue A.en
dc.contributor.authorZlotnick, Cherylen
dc.contributor.authorHeaslip, Vanessaen
dc.contributor.departmentAlphaen
dc.author.detailsSue A. Anderson, PhD, MS, BSN, BS, AS, RN, FNP-BC, Professional Experience: 1995-Present: IU South Bend, College of Health Sciences, School of Nursing: Visiting lecturer 1995-1997; Lecturer 1997-2011; Assistant Professor 2012-Present. Graduate Program Director, 2014-present. 2001-Present: Family Nurse Practitioner at Campbell Ear, Nose & Throat (formerly known as ENT of Michiana): 2001- present. 1997-2001: Family Nurse Practitioner at Holm Memorial Clinic. 1993-1996: Registered Nurse at Memorial Hospital of South Bend Emergency Trauma Center. Responsible for teaching undergraduate and graduate nursing students since 1995. Currently serving the Graduate Program Director for the Master of Science in Nursing Family Nurse Practitioner program at IU South Bend. Family Nurse Practitioner providing otorhinolaryngology care to at-risk patients in South Bend, Indiana since 2001. Completed dissertation research with Hispanic mothers in 2011. Engaged in research project with Hispanic community investigating impact of economy on cardiovascular health. Volunteer health care provider at several Hispanic community health fairs. Author Summary: Sue Anderson is an Associate Professor and Family Nurse Practitioner Program Coordinator in the DNP Program at St. Mary's College. In addition to her work as a nurse educator, Dr. Anderson also maintains a clinical practice as a Family Nurse Practitioner. Her research has focused on health promotion practices including obesity risk, leisure time activity, and health disparities.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/621953-
dc.description.abstract<p><strong><strong>Purpose: </strong></strong><span>Located on different continents, the United Kingdom (UK), Israel and the United States (US) are high income countries differing in size, population size, and type of health care systems; yet, their general population's health outcomes are similar. </span><span lang="EN">This study used qualitative and quantitative information to </span><span>gain insight on the health care systems and health care accessibility of vulnerable groups in the general populations of these three industrialized countries.</span></p> <p><strong>Methods: </strong><span lang="EN">Using a</span> case-oriented, cross-country comparison, this study uses the three factors of the Behavioral Model of Utilization (i.e., health system environments, population characteristics and health behaviors/outcomes) to examine health care accessibility for selected vulnerable groups in each of the three countries (i.e., Israel, UK, US).  </p> <p><strong><span lang="EN">Results: </span></strong><span lang="EN">The health system environments and population characteristics differed dramatically. The health system of the United Kingdom had open access to all; Israel’s health system provided basic healthcare to all citizens, yet citizens could opt for different levels of services. The fee-for-service system in the US resulted in barriers to healthcare access for vulnerable citizens. Regardless of the type of healthcare system and level of access to health care, all three countries experienced threats to health. All health systems showed features indicating their adaptation to the dominant or majority group of the country’s general population. However, all three high income countries' health systems were inadequate at addressing vulnerable population groups (i.e., </span>socioeconomically low income individuals, minorities, immigrants, non-citizens) as demonstrated by unmet need and inadequate health behaviors.<strong></strong></p> <p><strong>Conclusion: </strong><span lang="EN">Despite the diversity of health system philosophies and approaches, none of the health systems were effective at addressing health care inaccessibility and or unmet need for vulnerable population groups. Health systems in high income countries must acknowledge that access to healthcare is an important component of a healthy population; knowledge development of specific strategies to improve health within communities is equally important. Health systems in the three countries lack </span>strategies that proactively engage, reach-out to and facilitate health care access for vulnerable populations<span lang="EN">. Nurses must be fully engaged through their work and research within communities to strengthen health systems and improve the health of all.</span></p>en
dc.subjecthealth promotionen
dc.subjecthealth systemsen
dc.subjectvulnerable populationsen
dc.date.available2017-07-19T19:46:32Z-
dc.date.issued2017-07-19-
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-19T19:46:32Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.name28th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.conference.locationDublin, Irelanden
dc.descriptionEvent Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarshipen
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