2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/621972
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Poster
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
Improving Nursing Care in Infants With Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome
Author(s):
Watson, Laura Ruth
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Omicron Psi
Author Details:
Laura Ruth Watson, MSN, RNC-OB, Professional Experience: 1996-2005-- Labor and delivery RN 2005-present--LDRP RN- Care provided for labor, postpartum, newborn, and Level II nursery patients 2006-present-- RNC-OB certification 2006-present-- Shift Coordinator 2014-present-- OB Clinical Instructor Author Summary: Laura Watson has been a labor and delivery nurse since 1996. She has been a nursing professor since 2014. She obtained her Doctor of Nursing Practice degree in April 2017. Laura is passionate about providing care for her patient population and instructing nursing students to be high-performing nurses. In her journey to provide best practice to her patients, she focused her DNP project on improving nursing care to infants born addicted to substances.
Abstract:

Purpose: The purpose of the project is to improve the nursing care of infants with neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) through staff education and peer assessment.

Objectives: The project objective is to provide education for the healthcare staff at two Midwestern hospitals to ensure consistent care is provided to NAS infants. By providing consistent care, NAS infants will be made more comfortable and improve quicker, decreasing their length of stay.

Expanded Content Outline: Sublett (2013), identifies since 1980 the incidence of the NAS has increased by 300%. Literature has shown that infants with neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) encounter serious medical complications resulting in prolonged hospital stays and expensive interventions. The average hospital stay for these neonates is 22-26.1 days (Lind et al., 2015).

NAS is a collection of multi-systems withdrawal signs and symptoms experienced by the neonate due to exposure in utero to substance use and dependency by the pregnant mother. Once the infant is born, the substance is no longer available, placing the infant at risk for withdrawal. The central nervous, respiratory, gastrointestinal, and autonomic systems are negatively affected in infants with NAS. Differentiation of care may affect the progression of the NAS infant (Lucas & Knoble, 2012).

In a three year study the cumulative hospital cost at a hospital in Gainesville, Florida for 40 infants diagnosed with NAS was 1.1 million dollars for the first year. By the third year the cost was 1.8 million for 63 diagnosed infants. For infants not diagnosed with NAS, by the third year of life, 63 infants’ average healthcare cost was $109,998. That is a total variance of $1,691,325 (Hall et al, 2014). Literature confirms that by instituting and adhering to clinical practice guidelines, a decrease in the length of hospital stay may be noted, thereby, decreasing the cost of care for the infants (Hall et al., 2014; Patrick et al., 2012).

Improvement of infant care will occur through educating staff about neonatal abstinence syndrome and the standard of care required by NAS infants. Education focusing on the value of inter-observer reliability/peer assessment will be provided. The project will lead to the development and adoption of evidence-based practice and policies recognizing the special needs of infants with NAS. Upon completion of the project, analyses will be performed to ensure the project objectives are being met and maintained. Length of hospital stay will be evaluated one year before, and one year following project implementation. Data will be collected from nursing staff to determine true effectiveness of staff education.

Evidence recommends strict care guidelines be adopted in institutions caring for NAS infants (Hall et al., 2014). The outcome for this study is to institute guidelines for the care of NAS infants admitted to nurseries of two Midwestern hospitals, with the goal to expand the project to other healthcare systems providing care to NAS infants.

Keywords:
infant withdrawl; neonatal abstinence syndrome; nursing peer assessment
Repository Posting Date:
20-Jul-2017
Date of Publication:
20-Jul-2017
Other Identifiers:
INRC17PST211
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
28th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Dublin, Ireland
Description:
Event Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarship

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePosteren
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.titleImproving Nursing Care in Infants With Neonatal Abstinence Syndromeen_US
dc.contributor.authorWatson, Laura Ruthen
dc.contributor.departmentOmicron Psien
dc.author.detailsLaura Ruth Watson, MSN, RNC-OB, Professional Experience: 1996-2005-- Labor and delivery RN 2005-present--LDRP RN- Care provided for labor, postpartum, newborn, and Level II nursery patients 2006-present-- RNC-OB certification 2006-present-- Shift Coordinator 2014-present-- OB Clinical Instructor Author Summary: Laura Watson has been a labor and delivery nurse since 1996. She has been a nursing professor since 2014. She obtained her Doctor of Nursing Practice degree in April 2017. Laura is passionate about providing care for her patient population and instructing nursing students to be high-performing nurses. In her journey to provide best practice to her patients, she focused her DNP project on improving nursing care to infants born addicted to substances.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/621972-
dc.description.abstract<p><strong>Purpose: </strong><span>The purpose of the project is to improve the nursing care of infants with neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) through staff education and peer assessment.</span></p> <p><strong>Objectives: </strong>The project objective is to provide education for the healthcare staff at two Midwestern hospitals to ensure consistent care is provided to NAS infants. By providing consistent care, NAS infants will be made more comfortable and improve quicker, decreasing their length of stay.</p> <p><strong>Expanded Content Outline</strong>: Sublett (2013), identifies since 1980 the incidence of the NAS has increased by 300%. Literature has shown that infants with neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) encounter serious medical complications resulting in prolonged hospital stays and expensive interventions. The average hospital stay for these neonates is 22-26.1 days (Lind et al., 2015).</p> <p>NAS is a collection of multi-systems withdrawal signs and symptoms experienced by the neonate due to exposure in utero to substance use and dependency by the pregnant mother. Once the infant is born, the substance is no longer available, placing the infant at risk for withdrawal. The central nervous, respiratory, gastrointestinal, and autonomic systems are negatively affected in infants with NAS. Differentiation of care may affect the progression of the NAS infant (Lucas & Knoble, 2012).</p> <p>In a three year study the cumulative hospital cost at a hospital in Gainesville, Florida for 40 infants diagnosed with NAS was 1.1 million dollars for the first year. By the third year the cost was 1.8 million for 63 diagnosed infants. For infants not diagnosed with NAS, by the third year of life, 63 infants’ average healthcare cost was $109,998. That is a total variance of $1,691,325 (Hall et al, 2014). Literature confirms that by instituting and adhering to clinical practice guidelines, a decrease in the length of hospital stay may be noted, thereby, decreasing the cost of care for the infants (Hall et al., 2014; Patrick et al., 2012).</p> <p>Improvement of infant care will occur through educating staff about neonatal abstinence syndrome and the standard of care required by NAS infants. Education focusing on the value of inter-observer reliability/peer assessment will be provided. The project will lead to the development and adoption of evidence-based practice and policies recognizing the special needs of infants with NAS. Upon completion of the project, analyses will be performed to ensure the project objectives are being met and maintained. Length of hospital stay will be evaluated one year before, and one year following project implementation. Data will be collected from nursing staff to determine true effectiveness of staff education.</p> <p>Evidence recommends strict care guidelines be adopted in institutions caring for NAS infants (Hall et al., 2014). The outcome for this study is to institute guidelines for the care of NAS infants admitted to nurseries of two Midwestern hospitals, with the goal to expand the project to other healthcare systems providing care to NAS infants.</p>en
dc.subjectinfant withdrawlen
dc.subjectneonatal abstinence syndromeen
dc.subjectnursing peer assessmenten
dc.date.available2017-07-20T14:28:36Z-
dc.date.issued2017-07-20-
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-20T14:28:36Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.name28th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.conference.locationDublin, Irelanden
dc.descriptionEvent Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarshipen
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